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How do you record your sets?

AshG

Member
Originally posted by --[Zirca]--
I use an identical set up. What do you do to "master" your recordings? Currently i just normalize and that's it. Any advice would be appreciated.

Dan
that's really all you should be doing.
 

RedInMtl

TRIBE Member
I'm no pro, just started recording my sets actually but here's the setup:
I'm using RCA -> Line in from my mixer to the line in on a port replictor for my Toshiba laptop. Using the freeware Audacity app to do the recording and normalizing.
Seems to do the trick so far...and really inexpensive!
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
RCA from the Record out of the mixer, to the line-in on the soundcard. The RCA has a ground loop isolator on it which eliminates the unwanted buzz that usually occurs with mixer to PC recordings, and maximizes your signal to noise ratio to waht's true of your soundcard.

In Windows, I select my recording channel as the 'Line In' and not the What You Hear which will end up picking up unwanted noise from other functions such as your mic channel. I use Soundforge 7 to record, and I test the levels on the VU meter making sure to leave at least 5DB of headroom for the range of louder tunes. Once recorded, I take out superfluous noise, and I add a light limiting on the whole set to normalize and level out the mixes. I usually apply a very light Waves’ L1 Ultramaximizer where the threshold only digs in about 3db to the loudest peak.

I save it to WAV, and encode it to mp3 with the Lame --alt-preset extreme setting, through the Razorlame interface. Then I take the WAV and throw it into Vegas 5, where I add the track regions (simply by hitting N) and label each track in the mix. I then burn it to CD straight from there and save the datafile.
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
Hey, on the topic of recording to line-in, does anyone use a laptop for their recording? If so, have any of you noticed the noise that usually gets picked up on the line in? (Yes, even with top-notch components, a perfectly clean signal and a line-in recording channel with all other channels muted) ... I really want to buy a laptop and use Ableton live with my setup, while recording. The problem is that I just don't want to have to deal with that static... :-\
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
I would never trust a laptop's internal soundcard for pro recording. Components are way too close together to allow for proper noise isolation. And the s2n ratios on them are usually shit. Get a laptop, but use an external soundcard for your audio stuff. They're cheap enough to be worth it. For my radio show, I sometimes use an external SoundBlaster live for use with Traktor on my old p3 laptop, and couldn't be happier with it's output. For recording, I'd go with an M-audio Audiophile external or equivalent, as the added MIDI capacity would be optimal for live production work.
 

Littlej

TRIBE Member
HD speed.

I have had a vary similar problem.

I found it to work. But in the end it was the lack of Ram and HD speed.

If you end up getting RAM and it still does not work right..change your HD buffer settings..that might trigger a good paportion you PC can handle better..and sometimes if you dedicate to much system process to your recording it ..wont be able to run window smooth;) so less is more sometimes...
 

Pascal

TRIBE Member
I've just recently started recording my mixes to cd (Get with the times Homer!!!!). I use a machine called (I think) HB Burn It 830.
It allows me to record my mixes the same as I would to a cassette tape and to me, the only downfall is that unless I have someone there, I don't indent my mixes track for track. Besides, I like leaving it as one long track anyways. My mix tells more of a story then.
 

xtcfreak

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Pascal
I've just recently started recording my mixes to cd (Get with the times Homer!!!!). I use a machine called (I think) HB Burn It 830.
It allows me to record my mixes the same as I would to a cassette tape and to me, the only downfall is that unless I have someone there, I don't indent my mixes track for track. Besides, I like leaving it as one long track anyways. My mix tells more of a story then.
I had that same burner, it takes .00005 of a second to reach over and hit the record button to split .. but i had mine close to my setup.. that burner produces some good sounding mixes IMO. Only thing I didnt like about it (as mentioned earlier) it skips easy.

Jay
 

chrismcnaughty

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by beaker
i think your usb interface might be okay too since you're just recording a stereo signal.
I wouldn't use USB, it's not fast enough. Firewire soundcards such as motu 828 is the way to go. I've used this with my mac powerbook and bias peak 4.0 at several live shows and it is rock solid. just make sure you have plenty of extra HD space.
 

ian

TRIBE Member
I just bought one of these:



24 bit Recording, Wave or MP3 and Compact Flash based memory. So far I'm loving the ease of use and the quality. It is a bit expensive though. It's more aimed at the professional I think.
 

slingshot

TRIBE Member
Ah.....just like that Porsche 911 you have always dreamed of.
Imagine Zoe in a baby seat in the back.

;)

ss

p.s. the flash capacity is limited to 64 MB - is it expandable?
 

ian

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by slingshot
Ah.....just like that Porsche 911 you have always dreamed of.
Imagine Zoe in a baby seat in the back.

;)

ss

p.s. the flash capacity is limited to 64 MB - is it expandable?
Yes.
 

SolChild

TRIBE Promoter
Ortofon Night Club Needles
Vestax PMC 25 with XLR outs
into my 1981 StudioMaster Console
into Peak 4.0 Platinum

then I drop it into Logic and apply some Waves Platinum Mastering Plugins. mostly compression and Limiting.

Bounce, Burn and enjoy!


mmmmmmmmm.....
 

DSV

TRIBE Promoter
Originally posted by Syndic8Soundboy
USB sounds like the only problem. Find a cheap FW interface and you're good to go... even if your computer is slow.
USB 2 is faster than FireWire.
 

Acidman

TRIBE Member
Clicks explained...

Clicks while recording could happen because of a few reasons :

1) insufficieft memory (RAM)
2) Fragmented harddrive with only one partition.
3) running softwares
4) Battery settings (for laptops) or Screen Savers (for windows)
5) Hard drive bad sectors.

-If you have a decent laptop i would recomend you divide your your hard drive to different partiotions placing windows, swap file and your current project (recording file) in three different partiotions.
-Then sure your screen saver is off.
-Now if you have a laptop you need to make sure that hard drive never turns off automatically (to save battery). you can check that in control panel, power options.
-close all the other running programs such as explorers, anti virus or other utilities.
-defragment your harddrive often. (twice a month)
-finally if you can afford it buying more RAM is always a great boost (for anything).
-if none of these worked you might wanna check your hardware for bugs or bad sectors (for harddrive).
 

Isosceles_CAT

TRIBE Promoter
Originally posted by DSV
USB 2 is faster than FireWire.
Not exaclty. Although by the specs USB2 is indeed > FireWire400, in practice there is far too much overhead with USB. Firewire is superior, especially when dealing with anything time sensitive (Video/Audio/MIDI).
 

Acidman

TRIBE Member
Another cause of clicking is an incorrect buffer size.

True, and thats ok since you dont care about delays too much when you record a set so change the buffer size to the maxiumum or something safe .
 

Acidman

TRIBE Member
USB 2 is faster than FireWire

Thats not true tho.
and i dont think the problem here is speed , you can record solid and smooth sets with no clicks even with laptops from 2 years ago.
One thing that really worked for me was partitioning my harddrive or if you can afford it buy and external fast hard drive (since laptops usually have slower hard drives than desktops).
 
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