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Hip/knee pain from running

Twinkle Toes

TRIBE Member
I have just started running. My physical fitness is pretty good, and I have no issues with endurance.

However, my hips and knees ache after I run a short distance (5 km). I use a roller and try to stretch, but it doesn't seem to be enough. I usually am still tender and stiff the next day.

Please offer any advice you may have, as I certainly could use it!
 
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rudebwoy

TRIBE Member
I have just started running. My physical fitness is pretty good, and I have no issues with endurance.

However, my hips and knees ache after I run a short distance (5 km). I use a roller and try to stretch, but it doesn't seem to be enough. I usually am still tender and stiff the next day.

Please offer any advice you may have, as I certainly could use it!

sounds like a foot/arch issue. what type of shoes are you using? I'd advise going to a running store and have someone look at your gait to figure out the proper type of shoes to wear.

c.
 

WestsideWax

TRIBE Promoter
Dr. Pribut on Runner's Knee (Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome)

Risk Factors:

Increased Q Angle
Weak or ineffective Vastus Medialis (VMO)
Patellar Dysplasia (e.g., small medial pole of patella)
Trochlear Dysplasia (congenital flattening of the lateral femoral condyle)
Patella Alta (High patella)
Hypermobility of Patella
Subluxating Patella
Ligamentous Laxity
Wide Hips (female runners)
Knock Knees (Genu Valgum)
Female gender (possibly multifactoral, wider hips, higher Q angle, etc.)
Malalignment of Extensor Mechanism
Other Lower Extremity Malaligment
Abnormal knee joint moments
Abnormal pronation of the foot
Weak Quadriceps Muscles
Tight Hamstrings or calf muscles
Weak Hip Abductors
Canted Surface
Overtraining (Terrible "too's", too much, too soon, too often, too fast, with too little rest)


I'd suggest a specialist over trusting some random at a running store to determine what's best for your physiology.
 

Balzz

TRIBE Member
Did you just immediately go from 0 to 5km running? Could just be sudden (lack of) progression causing the pain vs some biomechanical condition that everyone seems to want to have.
 

Twinkle Toes

TRIBE Member
Did you just immediately go from 0 to 5km running? Could just be sudden (lack of) progression causing the pain vs some biomechanical condition that everyone seems to want to have.

Yes I did.

I am a spinner normally, and do 4 hours a week on a bike. Once I got fit enough, I decided it was time to start running. Just jumped on the treadmill and started doing 5 km twice a week. However, on Friday, I ran 6.5 km outside on concrete. My legs where always somewhat sore after running on the treadmill, but it's worse after Friday. It's better today then yesterday, but wow!
 
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rudebwoy

TRIBE Member
I'd suggest a specialist over trusting some random at a running store to determine what's best for your physiology.

ya, sorry, i should've added that part. not a pimply faced high school kid who runs xc, but source out a trained specialist.

c.
 

The Truth

TRIBE Member
I get soreness on my feet and calves the next day from walking and running and a treadmill for 30-60 mins...I wear good shoes....should I be stretching more before starting?
 

SJN

TRIBE Member
Do you wear good shoes? Or do you wear good shoes that you have been properly fitted for? Can't stress enough how helpful it is to be properly fitted - all my pains disappeared within a week of switching to shoes that were fitted by a specialist.
 

WestsideWax

TRIBE Promoter
I went in the opposite direction. Was told I pronate and that I needed (expensive) stabilising, cushioned shoes. Did some of my own research, went out and bought a pair of near-flats (Saucony Kinvara - still my favourites), paid close attention to my form (relaxed lean into the run, proper cadence, mid-sole to toe strike), and have been running almost completely injury-free ever since.

Now that I've written that, I think I need to go for one.
 

LikeASweet

TRIBE Member
I went in the opposite direction. Was told I pronate and that I needed (expensive) stabilising, cushioned shoes. Did some of my own research, went out and bought a pair of near-flats (Saucony Kinvara - still my favourites), paid close attention to my form (relaxed lean into the run, proper cadence, mid-sole to toe strike), and have been running almost completely injury-free ever since.

Now that I've written that, I think I need to go for one.

Amen to this post - Best way to combat running injures is to work on technique. I used to run in stabilizing shoes like I was told to - I ended up buying the Kinvara as well and have never looked back. No injuries and very few aches or pains.
 
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Hawk Eye

TRIBE Member
Yes I did.

I am a spinner normally, and do 4 hours a week on a bike. Once I got fit enough, I decided it was time to start running. Just jumped on the treadmill and started doing 5 km twice a week. However, on Friday, I ran 6.5 km outside on concrete. My legs where always somewhat sore after running on the treadmill, but it's worse after Friday. It's better today then yesterday, but wow!

Running outside is way different then running on a treadmill.. You should do baby steps.. This is why people always get injured. Trying to go too fast too soon..

I'd go to a running store (running room, black toe running, the running shop) to get properly fitted for a shoe.
 

Balzz

TRIBE Member
Are those people in stores qualified or are they just practicing the running equivalent of broscience?
 

WestsideWax

TRIBE Promoter
I was going to say...unless you happen upon an exceptional individual, how accurate an assessment are you going to receive from someone who's paid $10.50 - $12 an hour and whose paycheque partially depends on volume of sales?
 
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