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High Carb diet: Lose weight fast! Haha...

PosTMOd

Well-Known TRIBEr
But, of course...


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High-Carb, Low-Fat Diet Drops Pound a Week

Dieters Ate All They Wanted and Still Lost Weight

By Sid Kirchheimer
WebMD Medical News Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario, MD
on Monday, January 26, 2004

Jan. 26, 2004 -- How's this for a great way to lose nearly a pound a week: Don't exercise. Don't count calories. Eat until you're full, and oh, yeah, what you eat mostly comes from the newest four-lettered word in the dieter's dictionary -- "carb."

It's not the latest best seller, but a study in the latest issue of Archives of Internal Medicine. And it shows that older, overweight people with prediabetes could eat as much as they want, eat large amounts of complex carbs, and still drop weight as long as they limited fat intake to no more than 20% of their total calories.

These findings are in contrast to the strategies of carb-restricting diets such as Atkins and initial phases of the South Beach diet that suggest excess carbs lead to more body fat.

"But in our study, people ate all the food they wanted on a high-carb, low-fat diet, they didn't exercise, and they still averaged 7-to-11 pound weight loss over three months," says study researcher William J. Evans, PhD, director of the nutrition and metabolism lab at the University of Arkansas College of Medicine. "This shows that the important point isn't in reducing calorie intake."

Instead, his study suggests that if you pig out, make sure the bulk of your diet consists of whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and leaner versions of meat and dairy.

Lots of Carbs, Lots of Exercise

The study compared a high-carb, high-fat diet -- the typical American diet -- consisting of 45% of calories from carbs 41% from fat, with a high-carb, low-fat diet of 63% carbs and 19% fat.

Half of those eating the high-carb, low-fat diet also exercised -- 45 minutes of aerobic exercise, four times a week.

As you may expect, those exercising and eating the high-carb, low-fat plan lost a few more pounds despite eating more calories than the other group. The exercisers lost an average of 11 pounds compared with 7 pounds for the non-exercisers on the same diet. The high-carb, high-fat dieters' weight did not change significantly.

When allowed to eat all they wanted, those eating the high-carb, high-fat diet had about 2,825 calories a day. The high-carb, low-fat dieters that didn't exercise ate about 2,250. The high-carb, low-fat exercisers ate about 2,400 calories.

These findings don't surprise two experts who were not involved in this research.

"It's not excess carbs that translates into more body weight, it's excess calories -- no matter where they come from," says Alice H. Lichtenstein, DSc, professor of nutrition at Tufts University and vice chairwoman of the nutrition committee of the American Heart Association. "And those on the typical American diet ate more calories.

"If you cut calories, you'll lose weight, even if you're not counting calories. And the difference between what was consumed in the low-fat, high-carb diet and the typical American diet was enough to translate to nearly a pound of weight loss a week," Lichtenstein tells WebMD. "If you're eating more fiber, you get filled up quicker."

Filling Foods

While the high-carb, low-fat dieters started each day with a fiber supplement, the real difference that boosted their fiber intake to nearly 60 grams a day seemed to be in the choices of the carbs they had: So-called "complex" carbohydrate foods that included subtle changes such as whole-grain baked goods instead of those using "white" refined flour; they also had more choices in produce and leaner cuts of meats and skimmed dairy products.

"I'm not at all surprised by these findings because this study reinforces the scientific soundness of the recommendations that have been made by a large number of health organizations over the years: Watch the total amount of fat and increase high-complex carbs such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains," says Cathy Moore, RD, MS, director of nutrition therapy at The Cleveland Clinic and a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association.

"It makes perfect sense that if doing those things, you're going to be able to lose weight. A lot of times, it's not necessary to count calories, as long as you focus on a difference in eating habits. Simple things like eating more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains means you're going to displace higher-calorie, high-fat foods and be less likely to overeat."

But in doing a new study that's not yet been published, Evans says he's finding that the major benefit may not be just from having more "complex" carbs and fiber.

"It turns out that it doesn't matter what form of carbs they have," he tells WebMD. "In a new study we're now doing, we're using more simple carbs -- high-glycemic bread and pasta -- and we're getting a similar pattern of weight loss.

"The key seems to be in limiting fat intake to 20% or less of their total calories, which is very achievable and not as restrictive as other low-fat regimens such as the Ornish or Pritikin diets."

SOURCES: Hays, N. Archives of Internal Medicine, Jan. 26, 2004; vol 164; pp 210-217. William J. Evans, PhD, director, Nutrition, Metabolism and Exercise Laboratory; professor of geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine, Little Rock. Alice H. Lichtenstein, DSc, senior scientist and director, Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Researcher Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston; spokeswoman, American Heart Association. Cathy Moore, RD, MS, director of nutrition therapy, The Cleveland Clinic; spokeswoman, American Dietetic Association.
 

PosTMOd

Well-Known TRIBEr
As I've said for years: Amount of calories = amount of weight lost, and proportion of macronutrients = what is lost/gained.

Blah, blah, blah.
 

Chris

Well-Known TRIBEr
Makes a little sense,

I would say it would involve more carb selection rather than free fall of eating what ever types of carbs you want. A good point to raise here is the obvious Glycemic Index point.

The additional supplement of fiber is also a good point to add. Fiber has been shown to help regulate blood sugar levels. By improving glucose "sugar" tolerance, blood sugar levels are lowered following meals with soluble fiber, the glycemic response of carbohydrates is then lowered.

With the intake of fiber your also less likely to overeat, a point raised in the study. Fiber has been shown to keep you feeling fuller longer , by slowing down the gastric emptying.
 
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rejenerate

TRIBE Member
What are the best ways to add fibre to your diet? (besides drinking some nasty mixture like Metamucil...ugh.)

~jen
 

PosTMOd

Well-Known TRIBEr
Originally posted by rejenerate
What are the best ways to add fibre to your diet? (besides drinking some nasty mixture like Metamucil...ugh.)
Eat things with fibre in them.
 
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Hawk Eye

TRIBE Member
I just got talking to my old roommate from 2 years ago and she was telling me how my other roommate lost a hundred and something pounds.

That's amazing.
This girl was obese.
She was pretty big and for her to lose that much weight is amazing!!

She just went on weight watchers and eats super healthy supposedly.

She's going to get a tummy tuck when she's down to her ideal weight to get the excess skin off.

I'm so happy for her bc i knew how upset she was with her weight. She would only go clothes shopping by herself bc she was embarrassed about her size.

I told Lisa to bring in a picture of Paulette bc i want to see her.

:)
 
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AshG

Member
Originally posted by rejenerate
What are the best ways to add fibre to your diet? (besides drinking some nasty mixture like Metamucil...ugh.)

~jen
metamucil, all of its similar ilk, and some high fibre cereals actually do your body more harm than good.

take your typical all-bran cereal for example.
artificially saturated with extra vitamins and minerals, you can say adios to these because of the overwhelming amount of fibre. most of those same minerals and vitamins get washed out along with the excessive amount of fibre.

too much of any one thing is unhealthy - especially in concentrated doses.
 

AshG

Member
Originally posted by Littlest Hobo
I could never lend credence to the 'rice will make you fat' theory. Rice is nice, and eaten by everyone.
i love rice - eat it almost every day, and lots of it.
i'm not fat, but i can see why some would bash it - it has no nutrional value, and would qualify as "empty calories" for some health gurus.
but i really don't care what those people have to say, and i shall continue my unabashed love affair with le rice.
 
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deep

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by AshG
metamucil, all of its similar ilk, and some high fibre cereals actually do your body more harm than good.

take your typical all-bran cereal for example.
artificially saturated with extra vitamins and minerals, you can say adios to these because of the overwhelming amount of fibre. most of those same minerals and vitamins get washed out along with the excessive amount of fibre.

too much of any one thing is unhealthy - especially in concentrated doses.
Well, yes, too much of anything is generally bad. But it has been demonstrated that psyllium (the chief ingredient in metamucil) pulls negative cholesterol out of your system, and most people tend towards having less fiber in their diet than too much. There are other benefits i.e. towards heart disease and colorectal cancer.

The way fiber works is exactly because it can't be processed by the body, so it is excreted. So yes, taking things like vitamins at the same time reduces the likelihood that those vitamins will be properly absorbed...but that's more a practical issue of what things should be ingested at the same time rather than reason to take something out of the diet altogether.
 

mingster

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by rejenerate
What are the best ways to add fibre to your diet? (besides drinking some nasty mixture like Metamucil...ugh.)

~jen

easy!

eat brown bread, instead of white
sprinkly a little all-bran in your morning cereal
have an apple
 

j bunny 2000

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Littlest Hobo
I could never lend credence to the 'rice will make you fat' theory. Rice is nice, and eaten by everyone.
I don't think i believe all the anti-carb craze either. When i was in Italy, the majority of their diet was bread and pasta. Plus they eat really late most of the time. Most of the Italians I saw were way slimmer than the average person here. I think it is mostly about lifestyle and not eating so much prepackaged junk foods that we have so available to us.


~J*bunny~
 

AshG

Member
Originally posted by deep
Well, yes, too much of anything is generally bad. But it has been demonstrated that psyllium (the chief ingredient in metamucil) pulls negative cholesterol out of your system, and most people tend towards having less fiber in their diet than too much. There are other benefits i.e. towards heart disease and colorectal cancer.

The way fiber works is exactly because it can't be processed by the body, so it is excreted. So yes, taking things like vitamins at the same time reduces the likelihood that those vitamins will be properly absorbed...but that's more a practical issue of what things should be ingested at the same time rather than reason to take something out of the diet altogether.
yeah that's true.
but it just irks me(why i don't know exactly), that some people think they're eating a healthy breakfast by eating an all bran cereal for breakfast, and that's it.
you know, by looking at the nutrional information on the box, it looks great, but in fact they're literally giving their body almost nothing to work with.

but what do i know?
i like alpha bits, and sometimes lucky charms.
 
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