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Harper's Weekly - always a good read

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
WEEKLY REVIEW ( from www.harpers.org )

Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, in response to
complaints that weapons of mass destruction still have not
been found in Iraq, speculated that Iraq might have
destroyed its illegal weapons before the war began. Paul
Wolfowitz, the deputy defense secretary, admitted that the
administration's focus on Saddam Hussein's alleged weapons
of mass destruction was simply politically convenient. "For
bureaucratic reasons we settled on one issue, weapons of
mass destruction," he said, "because it was the one reason
everyone could agree on." Wolfowitz pointed with pride to
the "huge prize" that resulted from the invasion, an
alternative to Saudi Arabia as a base for American forces. A
senior British official claimed that his government had
"transformed" an intelligence report on Iraq's purported
weapons of mass destruction to make it "sexier." "The
classic example," he said, "was the statement that weapons
of mass destruction were ready for use within 45 minutes."
Prime Minister Tony Blair denied fabricating the report but
Labour MPs were threatening to report him to the Speaker of
the Commons for misleading parliament. "No weapons means no
threat," said one MP. "Without WMD, the case for war falls
apart." "I believe the prime minister lied to us and lied to
us and lied to us," said another. "The whole war was built
upon falsehood and I think the long-term damage will be to
democracy in Britain." "The time has come when the British
government needs to concede that we did not go to war
because Saddam was a threat to our national interests," said
Robin Cook, the former British foreign secretary who
resigned over the Iraq war. "We went to war for reasons of
U.S. foreign policy and Republican domestic politics."
Neoconservatives both in and out of the Bush Administration
were pressing for a policy of "regime change" in Iran, and
the Defense Department was said to be in favor of a massive
covert operation to overthrow the Iranian government. Iran
announced the arrest of several suspected Al Qaeda members;
the White House said that the arrests were "insufficient,"
and President George W. Bush did not quite deny reports of a
possible American attack on Iran: "We've had all kinds of
reports that we're going to use force in Syria and now some
are, I guess, saying force in Iran, force here and force
there. This is pure speculation. We used force in Iraq after
a long, long period of diplomacy." The Pentagon discovered
200 vials of anthrax and other bacteria among 2,000 tons of
hazardous waste on an Army base about 50 miles from
Washington, D.C. President Bush told Polish journalists that
"we found the weapons of mass destruction," and Lt. Gen.
James Conway, the top U.S. Marine in Iraq, said that
American forces have looked very hard for weapons of mass
destruction but that "they're simply not there."

President Bush went on a tour of Europe and visited the Nazi
death camp at Auschwitz, where he wrote "never forget" in
the guest book; a few hours later he made a speech at a
castle and used the occasion to congratulate himself for
invading Iraq, where it was estimated that 10,000 cluster
bombs were lying around unexploded. Fifty thousand people
marched to protest the G8 summit in Evian, France, but were
kept 30 miles away from the town. Bush gave Vladimir Putin a
big hug and invited him to a sleepover at Camp David;
Jacques Chirac and Gerhard Schroeder received perfunctory
handshakes. The president was photographed holding hands
with Crown Prince Abdullah of Saudi Arabia. Some Afghan
civilians were found to have "astonishing" levels of uranium
in their urine. Eric Robert Rudolph, the Christian
terrorist, was arrested in North Carolina after a five-year
manhunt. Maj. Gen. Geoffery Miller, the commander of Camp
Delta, the Guantanamo Bay concentration camp for suspected
terrorists, announced plans to build a death row and an
execution chamber at the camp. The Supreme Court ruled that
police can question suspects who are in great pain without
reading them their rights; Justice John Paul Stevens called
the interrogation at issue in the case "the functional
equivalent of an attempt to obtain an involuntary confession
from a prisoner by torturous methods." Philadelphia's city
council voted to condemn the USA Patriot Act. President Bush
was made an honorary Yale Whiffenpoof. "We are poor little
lambs who have lost our way," he said. "Baa, baa, baa."

President Bush signed a bill permitting a record-breaking
$984 billion increase in the amount the government is
allowed to borrow, raising the limit to an historic $7.4
trillion; the next day Bush signed his new tax cut, which
could save Dick Cheney $100,000 a year. It was discovered
that families earning between $10,500 and $26,625 a year
will not receive the new increase in the child tax credit.
Schoolchildren in Akron, Ohio, will be fingerprinted so that
they can be identified in school lunch lines. A baby was
found crawling down the middle of a busy street in Orem,
Utah, at 3 a.m. In South Africa a baby was born after
developing inside her mother's liver instead of in the womb.
Sherpa Lhakpa Gelu climbed Mt. Everest in 10 hours 56
minutes. A Virginia woman crashed into Secretary of Defense
Donald Rumsfeld's car but failed to injure him. An
83-year-old man in Queens, New York, accidentally ran down
and killed his 82-year-old wife while parking his car.
England sent a spaceship to Mars. President Bush told the
new owner of the Anaheim Angels that "it's pretty quick how
things happen in America. You buy the team, now you're at
the White House." China cracked down on spitting, and the
Communist Party Central Committee's Spiritual Civilization
Office issued a "Directive on Launching Activities to
Transform Vile Habits." Hungry tigers and lions in Chinese
zoos were trying to eat one another. Scientists in Idaho
cloned a mule. Bob Hope turned 100. A lawmaker in Nebraska
proposed declaring war on Iowa, and (my favourite) King Mswati of Swaziland blamed the world's ills on women who wear pants. A new study found that handsome men have the fastest sperm.
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
Is anyone else struck by the irony of President Bush making a speach at Auschwitz, when granpappy Prescot Bush made so much money from the Nazi killing machine?
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Subsonic Chronic
Is anyone else struck by the irony of President Bush making a speach at Auschwitz, when granpappy Prescot Bush made so much money from the Nazi killing machine?

"Never forget. And if you do, we'll remind you."
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Boss Hog
"Never forget. And if you do, we'll remind you."
"Never forget. But if you diddn't done gone learned it in the first place, don't worry, you can still be prez."
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
WEEKLY REVIEW

President George W. Bush staged a handshake between the
Israeli and Palestinian prime ministers at a summit meeting
in Jordan. President Bush, Prime Ministers Ariel Sharon and
Mahmoud Abbas, and King Abdullah II of Jordan stood outdoors
together in the hot sun wearing suits and ties but were kept
free of unsightly perspiration by tubes installed by White
House operatives that blasted cold air from an ultra-quiet
air conditioner that was hidden nearby. Sharon and Abbas
read statements about the "road map" to peace that were
largely written by American officials. "I think when you
analyze the statements, you'll find them to be historic,"
Bush told reporters later. "Amazing things were said."
Hamas, Islamic Jihad, and the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade
responded to the summit with a joint attack on an Israeli
military outpost in Gaza, killing four soldiers. Elsewhere,
in the West Bank, Israeli forces shot a seven-year-old
Palestinian girl in the abdomen. President Bush flew over
Iraq shortly after he told U.S. troops in Qatar that Iraqi
weapons of mass destruction would eventually be found.
"We're on the look," he said. "We'll reveal the truth."
Officials said that the president did not set foot in Iraq
because the situation on the ground was too risky. There
were also concerns that such a visit would appear too
"imperial." The president was photographed rubbing a
soldier's big bald head. The two top editors of the New York
Times resigned in disgrace, and a Lutheran minister in Denmark
was suspended from his job for saying that "there is no
heavenly God, there is no eternal life, there is no
resurrection." A brothel in Nevada was offering free sex to
American soldiers.

Hans Blix, the chief weapons inspector for the United
Nations, said that the quality of American intelligence on
Iraq was very poor and suggested that the American and
British governments had "jumped to conclusions" about
weapons of mass destruction. A growing number of weapons
experts, engineers, chemists, and other scientists said that
the "germ trailers" trumpeted by the Americans are not at
all what one would expect from a mobile weapons lab and that
the units appear to be designed to produce hydrogen to fill
artillery balloons, which is what Iraqi scientists have
claimed. It was reported that the British sold such a system
to Iraq in 1987. Two of the highest-ranking Al Qaeda leaders
in United States custody denied that Al Qaeda had worked
with the Iraqi government. The British government admitted
that Alastair Campbell, Tony Blair's director of
communications, wrote a letter to the chief of the Secret
Intelligence Service apologizing for a report, "Iraq: Its
Infrastructure of Concealment, Deception and Intimidation,"
which contained material that was plagiarized from an old
out-of-date term paper found on the Internet. Campbell
promised to take "greater care" in the future. Douglas
Feith, an undersecretary at the Pentagon, denied what he
called the "urban legends" that the Pentagon lied about
Iraq's purported weapons of mass destruction or that
intelligence analysts were pressured to come up with slanted
reports. "I can't rule out what other people may have
perceived," he said. "Who knows what people perceive? I know
of nobody who pressured anybody." Dennis Hastert, the
speaker of the House, said he expected the weapons to turn
up eventually and pointed out that it took the FBI five
years to catch Eric Rudolph. Tom Delay, the House majority
leader, blamed it all on Bill Clinton. International weapons
inspectors were wondering why American troops failed to stop
Iraqi villagers who live near Tuwaitha nuclear complex from
dumping uranium yellowcake and nuclear sludge on the ground
and using the empty radioactive barrels to haul drinking and
bathing water; one woman from a nearby village called Al
Mansiya ("The Forgotten") wondered why so many journalists
were coming to visit. "We are like a string of beads that
has been cut, and all the beads are on the floor," she told
a reporter. "We love the Americans, but we loved Saddam
because he was our father. He was the tent over us -- he
was the string in our beads."

An internal study by the Environmental Protection Agency
found that about 25 percent of the country's biggest
industrial and water-treatment plants routinely violate
pollution standards and that the agency does too little to
correct the situation. The Federal Communications Commission
voted to relax restrictions on media ownership. Tom DeLay,
the House Majority Leader, killed a Democratic attempt to
extend a new tax credit to 6.5 million low-income families
who were left out of President Bush's latest tax cut. "There
are a lot of things that are more important than that,"
DeLay said. "To me, it's a little difficult to give tax
relief to people that don't pay income tax." The General
Accounting Office warned that government is using "immature
technology" in its missile defense shield, which is
scheduled to be deployed by 2004. It was announced that U.S.
troops will be pulled back from the "tripwire" along the
demilitarized zone between North and South Korea. Thailand
was in trouble with the Bush Administration for its lukewarm
support for the war on terrorism. "It is not enough to be
with us in the war on terrorism," said an official. "You
have to trumpet it." Episcopalians in New Hampshire elected
an openly gay bishop. The U.S. Air Guitar Championships were
held at the Pussycat Lounge in New York City. A federal
appeals court ruled that video games are protected by the
First Amendment. The unemployment rate rose to 6.1 percent.
A small airplane dropped from the sky over Los Angeles and
landed on an apartment building. A new study by the Pew
Global Attitudes Project found that anti-American sentiment
was at an all-time high in the Muslim world. Martha Stewart
was indicted for securities fraud and resigned as CEO of her
company. Pet prairie dogs were spreading monkeypox in the
American Midwest.
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
This week's review..

HARPER'S WEEKLY REVIEW
June 24, 2003

North Korea announced its intention to accelerate its
program to build a nuclear deterrent and said that a U.S.
naval blockade or embargo could lead to "all-out war"; a
state-run newspaper said that "the Iraqi war proved that
disarmament leads to war. Therefore it is quite clear that
the DPRK can never accept the U.S. demand that it scrap its
nuclear weapons program first." President Bush declared that
the world will not tolerate nuclear weapons in Iran. "Iran
would be dangerous," he said, "if they have a nuclear
weapon." The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence made a
deal to conduct a "review" of the Bush Administration's
handling of intelligence on Iraq but only if Democrats
agreed not to call it an "investigation." Stansfield Turner,
a former director of central intelligence, criticized the
Bush Administration for its use of intelligence to justify
the conquest of Iraq: "There is no question in my mind [that
policymakers] distorted the situation, either because they
had bad intelligence or because they misinterpreted it."
John Dean, former White House counsel to Richard Nixon, was
more blunt: "If Bush has taken Congress and the nation into
war based on bogus information, he is cooked. Manipulation
or deliberate misuse of national security intelligence data,
if proven, could be 'a high crime' under the Constitution's
impeachment clause. It would also be a violation of federal
criminal law, including the broad federal anti-conspiracy
statute, which renders it a felony 'to defraud the United
States, or any agency thereof in any manner or for any
purpose.'" Other mainstream commentators were also beginning
to use the word "impeachment" in connection with the weapons
of mass destruction scandal. American soldiers in Iraq were
being killed at a rate of one per day.

The Justice Department announced that it had arrested a
Muslim truck driver from Ohio who has admitted to working
with Al Qaeda, and officials said that he was planning to
attack the Brooklyn Bridge with a blowtorch. One hundred
seventy pounds of cesium 137 and strontium 90 were found in
a taxi in Tbilisi, Georgia, and 30 kilograms of cesium 137
were recovered from an unemployed schoolteacher in Bangkok
who was trying to sell the material to terrorists. "Cesium
137 is serious stuff, highly radioactive," said one expert.
"You put it alongside four kilograms or more of dynamite and
you've got a really dangerous terror weapon." Los Alamos
National Laboratory admitted that it had lost two glass
vials of plutonium oxide and said that the radioactive
material might have been thrown in the garbage. The
International Atomic Energy Agency reprimanded Iran for its
refusal to comply with an agreement on nuclear safeguards
and called for the country to accept stricter inspections.
Massachusetts repealed its "clean elections" law. Attorney
General John Ashcroft asked journalists to help convince the
American people that the U.S.A. Patriot Act, the
antiterrorism law that gave sweeping new powers to federal
law enforcement agencies, is really a good thing. President
Bush issued guidelines banning racial profiling except in
cases of terrorism and national security.

The peace process between Israel and the Palestinians
continued to move forward: Israel assassinated a Hamas
leader; Palestinian snipers killed a seven-year-old Israeli
girl and wounded her five-year-old sister and her father; a
suicide bomber blew up a grocery store in a small farming
town in northern Israel, killing the owner. There were riots
in Benton Harbor, Michigan, where black residents have long
complained of police harassment, after a motorcyclist died
during a police chase. Several Iranians set themselves on
fire to protest the arrest in Paris of 165 members of the
People's Mujahedeen, an Iranian opposition group. Aung San
Suu Kyi, the Burmese opposition leader who was taken into
"protective custody" by the military government of Myanmar,
turned 58. It was reported that Suu Kyi has not been given a
change of clothing since she was detained three weeks ago.
Russia's Duma, the lower house of parliament, passed a bill
that would allow the government to shut down news
organizations that publish "biased" election campaign
coverage. Senator Orrin Hatch said that he favored the
development of technology that would automatically destroy
the computers of people who violate copyright restrictions.
It was then discovered that Hatch's own website makes use of
pirated software. Al Gore was reportedly planning to start a
cable television network. President Bush raised $3.5 million
in one night, possibly a new record. The new Harry Potter
book sold about 5 million copies in one day; the author, J.
K. Rowling, was said to be richer than the Queen of England.
Scientists created a genetically engineered grass that
doesn't cause hay fever. Other genetic engineers came up
with coffee plants that produce up to 70 percent less
caffeine. A naked headless corpse was found near the castle
Frankenstein in Germany. A nine-year-old girl in an Indian
village married a dog to avoid a bad omen. New Zealand
proposed a tax on flatulent livestock
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
Re: This week's review..

Originally posted by OTIS
Other mainstream commentators were also beginning
to use the word "impeachment" in connection with the weapons
of mass destruction scandal. American soldiers in Iraq were
being killed at a rate of one per day.

That's right, fucker.

If Clinton can go down for getting his dick sucked and lying about it, you can certainly go down for killing thousands of people for the greed of you and your buddies.
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
There's a theory that the larger the scandal, the less likely it will end in impeachment.

While most Americans have the understanding required to easily swallow the implications of the prez blowing his load of adultry on an overweight intern's blouse of sin, the political intelligence required for Joe Q. Flagwaver to understand the impeachable aspects of the current administration's actions is exponentially greater in comparison, and sadly with Bush's case in particular, beyond the average American's political scope, which translates into lack of interest, which translates into lack of public outcry, which translates into less momentum behind impeachment.

Although, I'd love to be wrong, and restore my faith in the capability of average Americans.
 

beaker

TRIBE Member
anyone read this month's issue? harper's readings are always amazing. in this month there's a really cool one written by a guillotine executioner. plus tons of fodder for all of us anti-war types.
 

swilly

TRIBE Member
Los Alamos
National Laboratory admitted that it had lost two glass
vials of plutonium oxide and said that the radioactive
material might have been thrown in the garbage


that is fucking crazy


swilly
 

swilly

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Boss Hog
I will be in Los Alamos in a week.

Anyone want me to pick them up some plutonium?
ya i am running low just a few spoonfulls for my delorian time machine.

that way i can travel back in time to tell myself not to forget to pick up some plutonium at the store, thus saving you having to get it for me in los alamos.

But then that would mean i should already hav it buy now and not need to ask you

Then that means you are not going to get me any while you are there.
fuck you boss hog some freind you are with all your want anything from los almos false advertising

swilly:mad:
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by beaker
anyone read this month's issue? harper's readings are always amazing. in this month there's a really cool one written by a guillotine executioner. plus tons of fodder for all of us anti-war types.
I just got my first issue in the mail about a week ago and started reading it today. I skipped through most of someone whining about anti-smoking laws and ended on the Harper's Index for this month.

Pete
 

beaker

TRIBE Member
yeah that editorial was pretty irritating. the readings are my favorite part of each month's issue though. the one i was talking about is in that issue. :)
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by swilly
ya i am running low just a few spoonfulls for my delorian time machine.

that way i can travel back in time to tell myself not to forget to pick up some plutonium at the store, thus saving you having to get it for me in los alamos.

But then that would mean i should already hav it buy now and not need to ask you

Then that means you are not going to get me any while you are there.
fuck you boss hog some freind you are with all your want anything from los almos false advertising

swilly:mad:

swilly.

you are one of a kind.

take that as you will.
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
=====
HARPER'S WEEKLY REVIEW
July 8, 2003

President George W. Bush dismissed growing complaints that
he exaggerated the threat posed by Iraq in the buildup to
the invasion and invited Iraqis who remain loyal to Saddam
Hussein to attack American troops: "There are some who feel
like that if they attack us, that we may decide to leave
prematurely," he said. "My answer is: bring them on. We've
got the force necessary to deal with the security
situation." Resistance to the occupation continued to
escalate; in one incident, a man walked up to an American
soldier who was waiting in line to buy a drink at Baghdad
University, said "Hello, mister," and shot him dead. A
nearby crowd was heard shouting "Allahu Akbar." Rumors were
circulating among Iraqis that power shortages were the
result of American retribution for guerrilla attacks, and a
resistance group called the Muslim Fighters of the
Victorious Sect warned that it will execute Iraqis who
collaborate with the Americans. Seven Iraqi policemen who
had just completed an American training course were killed
and 50 were injured by a bomb as they marched down the
street as part of their graduation ceremony. The United
States announced a $25 million bounty for Saddam Hussein and
$15 million for each of his sons. A tape of a man claiming
to be Saddam Hussein was broadcast on Al-Jazeera television;
the man said he was in Iraq and planning more attacks on his
enemies. The commander of the American forces in Iraq
acknowledged that the war was not over. Poland's foreign
minister admitted that his country sent troops to Iraq
because it wanted to obtain direct access to Iraqi oil
supplies. Hans Blix retired, and President Bush was said to
be thinking about bringing peace to the people of Liberia.

Prime Minister Ariel Sharon of Israel and Prime Minister
Mahmoud Abbas of the Occupied Territories got together on
their own initiative and shook hands publicly; Abbas
expressed his wish to end suffering, death, and pain. Prime
Minister Silvio Berlusconi of Italy created an uproar when
he said that a German member of the European Parliament (who
challenged Berlusconi's use of a new immunity law to avoid
corruption charges) would make a good Nazi
concentration-camp commander. Berlusconi later refused to
apologize to Germany but said that he was sorry that his
ironic little joke had been misunderstood. President
Johannes Rau of Germany had the word "Luftwaffe" removed
from his two government airplanes to avoid upsetting people
in countries conquered by Germany during World War II.
Israeli scientists were developing a technique for
harvesting eggs from aborted human fetuses, which, if used
to create a pregnancy, would turn the donor fetus into an
"unborn mother." "I am fully aware of the controversy about
this," said Tal Biron-Shental, the lead researcher, "but
probably, in some places, it will be ethically acceptable."
Swedish scientists predicted that human womb transplants
will be possible within three years. Tanzania was cracking
down on the human skin trade. Dell Computer announced that
it will no longer use prison labor. The British House of
Commons voted to ban fox hunting with dogs.

Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, who was a guest
of honor at the opening of the new National Constitution
Center in Philadelphia, attempted to unveil a painting of
the signing of the Constitution, with Justices O'Connor,
Antonin Scalia, and other celebrity guests in place of the
Founding Fathers; instead, a large steel-and-wood structure
that was suspended over O'Connor collapsed, narrowly missing
her but striking Senator Arlen Specter. Senator Bill Frist
called for a constitutional amendment banning gay marriage.
An Oklahoma man was sentenced to life in prison for spitting
on a policeman. A primary school in China was fining
children five yuan per incident for farting in class.
Britain's chief medical officer called for a nationwide ban
on smoking in public places. The United States suspended
military aid to almost 50 countries, including Colombia,
that have failed to promise they will not send American war
criminals to the International Criminal Court. Coca-Cola's
bottler in Colombia was sued for financing right-wing death
squads. Scientists discovered a new subatomic particle
called the pentaquark. A group of children in Oslo, Norway,
found a human skull in their kindergarten's sandbox. A
British woman was temporarily blinded and badly blistered
after lightning struck her tongue stud.

--Roger D. Hodge
 

416

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Subsonic Chronic
I just got my first issue in the mail about a week ago and started reading it today. I skipped through most of someone whining about anti-smoking laws and ended on the Harper's Index for this month.

Pete
Haha, I bought that issue!

....and the article you just refered to was brilliant!

BRILLIANT I TELL YOU!

SOCIALIST SMOKERS OF THE WORLD UNITE!
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
=====
HARPER'S WEEKLY REVIEW
July 15, 2003

The White House admitted that President Bush's claim in his
last State of the Union address that Iraq had tried to buy
uranium from Niger was based on "unsubstantiated"
intelligence; George Tenet, the director of central
intelligence, took the blame for the president's discredited
claim and said that "these 16 words should never have been
included in the text written for the president." Tom
Daschle, the Senate minority leader, said that this matter
"ought to be reviewed very carefully." Howard Dean, the
former governor of Vermont and a Democratic presidential
candidate, said that "this government either is inept or
simply has not told us the truth." President Bush, asked
whether he regretted his false claim about the uranium,
responded by saying there was "no doubt" in his mind that he
was right to conquer Iraq. "And there's no doubt in my mind,
when it's all said and done, the facts will show the world
the truth." Condoleezza Rice, the national security adviser,
said that the president's discredited claim was still
technically a true statement: "The British government did
say that." American soldiers continued to die in Iraq, and
the U.S. Central Command reported an average of 13 armed
attacks on American forces each day. President Bush's
approval rating was down to 59 percent, according to a new
poll, and 52 percent of respondents said that the level of
American casualties in Iraq was "unacceptable." Iraq's new
interim Governing Council was announced. Its first act was
to abolish six holidays associated with Saddam Hussein;
April 9, the date of the fall of Baghdad, was declared a new
national holiday. Danish troops in Iraq received a supply
shipment of lawn mowers and snowplows.

President Bush traveled to Africa where he and his family
were entertained by the sight of two elephants mating. Mrs.
Bush read a book about Clifford the big red dog to some
HIV-infected children in Uganda; the children responded with
a song: "AIDS has no mercy to the youth," they sang. "We all
die young." The Food and Drug Administration was planning to
make it easier for companies to make misleading health
claims about their food products. "Many Americans are not
getting clear information on how the foods they choose
affect their health," said the FDA's commissioner about the
initiative. "We need to do a better job on this urgent
public-health problem." It was discovered that clown fish
can change their sex as they move up in social status.
Britain proposed giving transsexuals the right to get
married in their adoptive sex. Jerry Springer, the talk-show
host, filed to run for the Senate in Ohio. German Chancellor
Gerhard Schroeder canceled his Italian vacation in
retaliation for insulting remarks about German tourists made
by Italy's tourism minister; regional officials asked the
Italian government to declare a "state of calamity" to
compensate for the anticipated loss of German tourist
business. A racist factory worker in Mississippi who was
angry at being forced to attend sensitivity training killed
five co-workers and then himself. The federal commission
investigating the September 11 attacks complained that the
Justice Department and the Pentagon were not cooperating.
President Bush was photographed holding hands with the
president of Senegal. A new study found that marriage
significantly undermines the careers of scientists and
criminals.

The World Meteorological Organization said that the extreme
weather conditions observed this spring across the globe
(very high temperatures in parts of Europe, 562 tornadoes in
one month in the United States, a heat wave in India that
killed at least 1,400 people) were strong evidence that
global climate change is happening now and that the number
of such extreme weather events can be expected to increase.
Eastern equine encephalitis, a mosquito-borne disease which
mainly affects horses, was said to be "unusually active"
this year. The Food and Drug Administration reported that a
feed company in Washington State had admitted to violating
rules designed to prevent the spread of mad cow disease.
Fishermen in Italy were using live kittens to catch giant
sheat fish in the Po River. Customs agents in Hong Kong
seized 10,000 endangered turtles on their way from Malaysia
to China, probably to be eaten. Kraft Foods, apparently
worried about tobacco-style lawsuits from obese people,
announced that it was committed to producing healthier
foods. Eleven people in Texas were quarantined with
SARS-like symptoms. Legionnaires' disease was on the rise. A
giant flyborg, an artificially intelligent robot balloon,
escaped from the Magna Science Adventure Centre in Britain.
It was discovered that some women ovulate more than once a
month. Singapore lifted its ban on chewing gum.

--Roger D. Hodge

http://www.harpers.org/weekly-review

Copyright 2003 Harper's Magazine Foundation



* * * * * * * * *
INBOX

From: "Curtis, Meghann"
To: "Harper's Magazine" <harpers-weekly@harpers.org>
Subject: RE: Harper's Weekly
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2003 13:18:07 -0400

To Whom it May Concern:

I am writing in response this this week's notice indicating
that "A primary school in China was fining children five
yuan per incident for farting in class." My query: how is
it that they assign blame? Isn't the assignment of blame in
this circumstance a time honored dilemma? Perhaps the real
news story here would be a finite detailing of this, till
now elusive, methodology.

Sincerely,
Meghann Curtis
Brooklyn, New York

~~

From: bob
To: harpers-weekly@harpers.org
Subject: Dell uses prison labor
Date: Tue, 08 Jul 2003 08:50:10 -0700

"Dell Computer announced that it will no longer use
prison labor"

I see you've taken to writing about domestic issues with the
same fine attention to fact and detail you have heretofore
reserved for pushing the Palestinian agenda ("Palestinian
family mourns tragedy of heroic freedom fighter who
accidentally exploded in a crowded Haifa shopping center. Up
to a couple of dozen aggressive, militant, and likely armed
Israeli women and children shoppers who were probably part
of an illegal settlement on Palestinian land may also have
been inadvertently killed.").

How typical of a press story to leave out most of the
important facts.

Dell Computer was only using prison labor to sort and
recycle the tens of thousands of obsolete computers it gets
as trade-ins every month. The only way to make this cost
effective is with extremely cheap labor. So they spend a
little money in this country (seems to be less and less of
that these days), a lot of stuff gets recycled, everyone
wins.

As always, the whiners who objected could not see past their
short-term political agenda, and never considered the
long-term consequences. With the program ended, Dell will
either stop accepting trade-ins, or send them en masse
straight to the landfills. People who don't get anything for
their trade-ins will also eventually send them to the dump.

How does this help anyone?

Bob Kertesz
Los Angeles, CA

* * * * * * * * *
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by OTIS From: bob
To: harpers-weekly@harpers.org
Subject: Dell uses prison labor
Date: Tue, 08 Jul 2003 08:50:10 -0700

"Dell Computer announced that it will no longer use
prison labor"

I see you've taken to writing about domestic issues with the
same fine attention to fact and detail you have heretofore
reserved for pushing the Palestinian agenda ("Palestinian
family mourns tragedy of heroic freedom fighter who
accidentally exploded in a crowded Haifa shopping center. Up
to a couple of dozen aggressive, militant, and likely armed
Israeli women and children shoppers who were probably part
of an illegal settlement on Palestinian land may also have
been inadvertently killed.").
All I have to say is WTF??? This guy's got a chip on his shoulder about something!
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by OTIS
The federal commission
investigating the September 11 attacks complained that the
Justice Department and the Pentagon were not cooperating.
Surprise surprise.
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Subsonic Chronic
All I have to say is WTF??? This guy's got a chip on his shoulder about something!
Either that or he's a Jewish Dell Executive.
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
One thing that makes me angry is the "leftist's" reaction to the WMO report. If you read the report, you'll notice that the WMO simply makes some observations regarding the global climate, and some other interesting, environmental trends. What makes me angry is that inevitably, a lot of the opinion and alternative news sites jumped on this and wrote articles that implied humans were the cause of these trends. They didn't have the audacity to state it outright, but the implication was there. In the generic news, I've noticed a similar intonation in the reporting, but it is very prevalent in the leftist media.

It angers me, because the human -> global warming connection is unfounded and not at all what the WMO report was about. I don't like it when even the alternative media debases itself to create sensationalism out of mere observations.


....ok. I'm done my rant. :)
 
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