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Hamas 'implicitly accepts Israel'

man_slut

TRIBE Member
Well lets see how this turns out...

Hamas 'implicitly accepts Israel'

Palestinian militant group Hamas has agreed to a document backing a two-state solution to the conflict with Israel, officials say.

The initiative, devised by Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli jails, implicitly recognises the Jewish state.

Hamas's charter currently calls for Israel's destruction by force and rules out peace negotiations with it.

The deal comes amid heightened tension with Israel following the capture of an Israeli soldier by militants on Sunday.

Israeli tanks and troops have massed on the border and Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert has warned that a large scale military operation is rapidly approaching.

Palestinian militants acknowledged for the first time on Tuesday that Israeli tank gunner Gilad Shalit was alive.

"The soldier is in a secure place that the Zionists cannot reach," said Mohammed Abdel Al, a spokesman for the Popular Resistance Committees, one of three Palestinian groups involved in Sunday's abduction.

According to Israeli media reports officials believe he was injured in the stomach and hand during the attack near Kerem Shalom.

In other developments:


A car explodes in Gaza City killing a Hamas militant and injuring two other people. Israel denies any involvement

The Israeli military says it has arrested 43 suspected Palestinian militants in overnight raids across the West Bank

Egypt has deployed hundreds of riot police along its border with the Gaza Strip to stop any Palestinian attempts to cross illegally in the event of Israeli raids, Reuters news agency reports
Extent of shift

Palestinian officials said the agreement would be unveiled later on Tuesday by Prime Minister Ismail Haniya of Hamas and President Mahmoud Abbas, of the rival Fatah faction.

"We can announce that we have agreed on the document," Rawhi Fattouh, an aide to Mr Abbas, said. "We can say that all the barriers have been removed."

"We agreed on all the points of the prisoners' initiative," Hamas spokesman Sami Abu Zuhri was quoted by AFP as saying.


The two factions have been locked in an intense power struggle since Hamas gained control of the Palestinian parliament in elections in January.

The BBC's Alan Johnston in Gaza says that the document that Hamas and Fatah have been negotiating for weeks talks of working to end the Israeli occupation and establish a Palestinian state in the West Bank, east Jerusalem and Gaza, which would live alongside Israel.

Hamas has, up until now, always rejected any recognition of Israel, which it regards as having been founded on stolen Palestinian land.

It is not yet clear what movement Hamas may have made on this crucial issue, our correspondent says.

When the agreement is made public, the wording and the details will need to be scrutinised to see if there has been any really significant shift in Hamas' position, our correspondent says.

The US held back on praising the agreement saying that it lacked substance.

"Let's wait until we see something for real," White House spokesman Tony Snow said, insisting that if Hamas wanted to be recognised it had to renounce terror.

'Moral obligation'

News of the Hamas-Fatah agreement came as a standoff over the abduction of Cpl Shalit, who was seized by Palestinian militants in a clash on the Gaza border on Sunday, continues.

On Monday three Palestinian militant groups demanded the release of Palestinian women and youths being held in Israeli jails in return for news of the kidnapped soldier.

Ramallah resident Walid al-Houdaly, whose wife and 18-month-old child are in an Israeli jail, told the BBC News website that he backed those calls:

"There is one soldier, but there have been hundreds of Palestinians kidnapped from their houses," he said.

Speaking to the BBC on Tuesday, Israeli foreign ministry spokesman Mark Regev said that the release of Cpl Shalit must be immediate and unconditional.


"The state of Israel does not negotiate with terrorists," Mr Regev insisted. "Unless he is released it is our moral obligation as a government to take action to free him."

"We do not want to act, but we will," Mr Regev added. "If the Palestinian leadership can convince those holding him to release him immediately this crisis that we are in will dissipate."

Intense diplomatic efforts have been under way since the soldier's disappearance, including mediation by an Egyptian delegation in the Gaza Strip.

The Israeli leader must choose between going ahead with military action that would endanger the life of the captured soldier or risk being seen as weak, says the BBC's Jon Leyne in Jerusalem.

And the Hamas-led Palestinian government must decide whether they are really willing to go into a full-scale confrontation with the Israelis which could have disastrous consequences.


Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/middle_east/5121164.stm
 
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Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
I read this thing like 5 times and I can't see how this 'implicitly' accepts anything. I read the 18 points of the prisoners agreement and they don't really offer anything other than a statement of beliefs that have already been stated 100 times before.
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
No recognition of Israel - Hamas
Rival Palestinian political factions Fatah and Hamas have reached agreement on a common political strategy to try to end a damaging power struggle.

However, as details of the deal have emerged early reports that Hamas had implicitly agreed to recognise Israel appear unfounded, correspondents say.

The full text of the deal has not yet been released, but early drafts make no mention of Israel's right to exist.

The deal comes amid heightened tension over the capture of an Israeli soldier.

The BBC's James Reynolds in Jerusalem says that the central point of the joint manifesto is the creation of a Palestinian state on the West Bank and the Gaza Strip.

Traditionally that is one half of a two-state solution, but the existing drafts of the deal make no mention of the second half of this solution - the state of Israel.

This omission is deliberate, our correspondent says.

While some have argued that this means Hamas tacitly accepts Israel's right to exist, it is becoming clear that that is not how Hamas sees it.

Hamas negotiators have told the BBC that the entire state of Israel has been built on occupied Palestinian land. They believe that a Palestinian state on the West Bank and Gaza is a first step - not a final step.

They believe that future generations of Palestinians will reclaim all their historic homeland. And that, in the end, there will be no room for what is now the Jewish state of Israel.

Palestinian minister, Abdul Rahman Zidan, told the BBC the document did not in any way recognise the state of Israel:

"This is an internal agreement between the Palestinians. There is no agreement between the Palestinians on specifically this phrase. You will not find one word in the document clearly stating the recognition of Israel as a state. Nobody has agreed to this. This was not on the table. This was not in the dialogue," he said.
Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/middle_east/5122822.stm
 
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Big Harv

TRIBE Member
Ditto Much said:
Hamas negotiators have told the BBC that the entire state of Israel has been built on occupied Palestinian land. They believe that a Palestinian state on the West Bank and Gaza is a first step - not a final step.

They believe that future generations of Palestinians will reclaim all their historic homeland. And that, in the end, there will be no room for what is now the Jewish state of Israel.

Palestinian minister, Abdul Rahman Zidan, told the BBC the document did not in any way recognise the state of Israel:

"This is an internal agreement between the Palestinians. There is no agreement between the Palestinians on specifically this phrase. You will not find one word in the document clearly stating the recognition of Israel as a state. Nobody has agreed to this. This was not on the table. This was not in the dialogue," he said.
Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/middle_east/5122822.stm

I hope this is not the prevailing viewpoint of most Palestinians.
 

docta seuss

TRIBE Member
CBC News said:
Rival Palestinian factions Fatah and Hamas agreed on a plan Tuesday to end their power struggle, but Hamas denied earlier reports that the deal implicitly recognized Israel.

The agreement follows weeks of acrimonious negotiations surrounding the document, which was written earlier this year by Palestinian inmates in Israeli prisons.

The 18-point proposal calls for a Palestinian state alongside Israel. But Palestinian minister Abdel Rahman Zeidan told the BBC Tuesday that the deal does not recognize the state of Israel.

"There is no agreement between the Palestinians on specifically this phrase," the BBC quoted Zeidan as saying. "You will not find one word in the document clearly stating the recognition of Israel as a state. Nobody has agreed to this. This was not on the table. This was not in the dialogue."

In Washington, White House spokesperson Tony Snow said the United States will not change its position toward the Palestinian government until Hamas recognizes Israel.

"Let's wait until we see something for real," said Snow.

Tensions running high

The development comes against a backdrop of rising tensions along the Israeli-Gaza border.

Hundreds of tanks and armoured personnel carriers are gathering near northern Gaza as foreign negotiators work to win the release of an Israeli soldier. He was abducted by Palestinian militant groups, including the military wing of Hamas.

A militant organization that rejects Israel's right to exist, Hamas won a surprise victory in January's parliamentary elections.

The group, whose founding charter calls for the destruction of the Jewish state, has claimed responsibility for dozens of attacks inside Israel.

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and Palestinian Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh, of Hamas, have been locked in a power struggle for weeks, including a number of bloody battles between their security forces on the streets of Gaza.

Abbas has promoted the plan as a way to restart international funding for the Palestinian Authority, cut off by a number of Western countries after Hamas took over control of the government.

The economic embargo has led to a growing humanitarian crisis in the Palestinian Territories as tens of thousands of government workers haven't been paid for months.

Abbas, seen by many in the international community as key to restarting peace talks, had threatened to call a Palestinian referendum on the document.

Israel has called the prisoners' document an internal Palestinian affair and repeated a call for Hamas to reject violence and recognize the Jewish state.

Negotiated in secret by Palestinians serving time in Israeli prisons, the deal's signers include Sheikh Abdul Khaleq al-Natsheh of Hamas and Marwan Barghouti of Fatah, one of the most popular Palestinian political leaders.
clearly too good to be true.
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
1. Establishment of a Palestinian state, return of refugees to their homes.

2. Incorporate Hamas and Islamic Jihad into PLO.

3. Resist Israeli occupation of lands captured in 1967 (West Bank and Gaza).

4. Formulate political plan including Arab summit resolutions, PLO platform and fair international proposals.

5. Consolidate the Palestinian Authority as the core of the state.

6. Set up a national unity government for all factions, especially Fatah and Hamas.

7. PLO and President Mahmoud Abbas would be in charge of peace negotiations.

8. Freedom for all Palestinian prisoners held by Israel.

9. Aid for refugees.

10. Set up united movement for resistance against Israeli occupation with political backing.

11. Maintain democratic elections and politics.

12. Condemn Israeli and US siege on Palestinian people.

13. Promote national unity by backing the Palestinian Authority, president, PLO and government.

14. Ban on use of weapons in internal conflicts and renouncing divisions and (internal) violence.

15. Improve participation of people of Gaza in freedom and independence.

16. Reform and develop the security forces.

17. Pass laws to reorganize the security forces and ban security officers from political activity.

18. Boost efforts of international solidarity groups in struggles against Israeli occupation, settlements and security barrier.
 

SellyCat

TRIBE Member
I guess the implicit-ness comes from lack of explicit rejection of the Israeli state. (I find this to be extremely dubious logic. It's more like wishful thinking, but there is something to be said for--at least--not explicitly calling Israel's destruction. It's not the same thing, but a step in the right direction.)

In any case, the second clause in Point #1 is impossible, and so is Point #8.

All the other ones about denunciation and resistance are okay with me, except there should be a proposal to repudiate the use of terrorism--as defined by deliberate attacks on civillians--in exchange for Israeli repudiation of extra-judicial killings and collective punishment*

This would transform the context of their resistance, and lend it more universal legitimacy. Like Ditto and I both said, attacks on Israeli military forces are legitimate because they are armed combatants of the occupying power.

*Closures, blockades, sonic-booming, and all that kind of stuff.
 
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docta seuss

TRIBE Member
Israel launches air strike after talks for release of soldier fail

CBC News


Israeli planes attacked a bridge in northern Gaza late Tuesday following reports that negotiations have failed to secure the release of an Israeli soldier abducted by Palestinian gunmen in the Gaza Strip.

Israeli tanks were also reported to be on the move just outside Gaza but had not yet entered the territory.

Israel has been massing troops and armour around Gaza since Sunday and had been threatening a ground invasion of the Palestinian territory if militants refused to release Cpl. Gilad Shalit.

But officials with the Israeli Defense Force told CBC News that they are operating under the assumption that Shalit is still alive and that the attack on the bridge was to prevent him from being transported out of the Gaza Strip.

Earlier Tuesday, Israeli television Channel Two said that there is "zero chance" that the talks would secure the release of Shalit, increasing the chance of a major Israeli offensive against Gaza.

Israel has already sealed the borders of the long narrow strip that is home to more than one million Palestinians.

Shalit, 19, was abducted Sunday after Palestinian gunmen dug a 600-metre tunnel under the Gaza border and attacked a remote guard post. Two Israeli soldiers were also killed in the attack.

The military wing of the ruling Hamas party — Izzedine al-Qassam — as well as the Popular Resistance Committees and the Army of Islam all claimed responsibility for the attack.

Refused demand

Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert has refused a demand for the release of about 500 Palestinian women and children detained in Israel in exchange for information about the captured soldier.

Egyptian, Jordanian and French diplomats have been trying to negotiate Shalit's freedom. Shalit also holds French citizenship.
 
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docta seuss

TRIBE Member
invasion looming on the horizon? unless the poor sod's return is imminent, methinks so.


one would think that you'd have to have one heck of a valuable trophy to put a million Palestinians at risk in order to retain it.. but it's just one IDF soldier! what an aburdly awful strategy.
 
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