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Google to announce world domination today at noon

T

TRIBE Member
thats right mortals. accept your new google overlords!

google will announce today at noon how it will take over your life.

google os.
google mobile.

google > everything.
 
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T

TRIBE Member
gphoneconcept.jpg
 

stargurl*

TRIBE Member
From the google blog:
Where's my Gphone?
11/05/2007 08:09:00 AM
Posted by Andy Rubin, Director of Mobile Platforms

Despite all of the very interesting speculation over the last few months, we're not announcing a Gphone. However, we think what we are announcing -- the Open Handset Alliance and Android -- is more significant and ambitious than a single phone. In fact, through the joint efforts of the members of the Open Handset Alliance, we hope Android will be the foundation for many new phones and will create an entirely new mobile experience for users, with new applications and new capabilities we can’t imagine today.

Android is the first truly open and comprehensive platform for mobile devices. It includes an operating system, user-interface and applications -- all of the software to run a mobile phone, but without the proprietary obstacles that have hindered mobile innovation. We have developed Android in cooperation with the Open Handset Alliance, which consists of more than 30 technology and mobile leaders including Motorola, Qualcomm, HTC and T-Mobile. Through deep partnerships with carriers, device manufacturers, developers, and others, we hope to enable an open ecosystem for the mobile world by creating a standard, open mobile software platform. We think the result will ultimately be a better and faster pace for innovation that will give mobile customers unforeseen applications and capabilities.

We see Android as an important part of our strategy of furthering Google's goal of providing access to information to users wherever they are. We recognize that many among the multitude of mobile users around the world do not and may never have an Android-based phone. Our goals must be independent of device or even platform. For this reason, Android will complement, but not replace, our longstanding mobile strategy of developing useful and compelling mobile services and driving adoption of these products through partnerships with handset manufacturers and mobile operators around the world.

It's important to recognize that the Open Handset Alliance and Android have the potential to be major changes from the status quo -- one which will take patience and much investment by the various players before you'll see the first benefits. But we feel the potential gains for mobile customers around the world are worth the effort. If you’re a developer and this approach sounds exciting, give us a week or so and we’ll have an SDK available. If you’re a mobile user, you’ll have to wait a little longer, but some of our partners are targeting the second half of 2008 to ship phones based on the Android platform. And if you already have a phone you know and love, check out mobile.google.com and make sure you have Google Maps for mobile, Gmail and our other great applications on your phone. We'll continue to make these services better and add plenty of exciting new features, applications and services, too.

What would your phone do?

See also: http://www.openhandsetalliance.com
 
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deep

TRIBE Member
No big surprise here. Google opting to be in the middle of information intertubes rather than picking the end of just one.
 

oddmyth

TRIBE Member
LARF!

Google phone, hitting markets mid 2008, after the iphone has launched worldwide and has an open SDK.
 

TaCk OnE?

TRIBE Member
so what is that article actually telling us.

that a multitude of carriers and manufacturers are going to, at some point next year, align all their devices to googles new open source OS.

which will then what? give us all virtually the same phone, minus whatever software we put on to it?

how does this effect one manufacturers objectives, skills etc etc versus another? the benefits of open source OS rather than proprietary ones are obvious, but I'm not really understanding how this is the big news we've all been waiting for.
 
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oddmyth

TRIBE Member
deep said:
I wouldn't think of Apple and Google as antagonists in the marketplace.

You have a product made by someone else that runs your own OS.

I have a product that is made by me and runs my OS.

If we are the only real talent in this market then if you make money then I'm not making money. Sounds like a competitive market to me.

While the markets may not be fully overlapping, its pretty damn close.

This shouldn't come as a surprise to you though Deep, I would love to hear why you think otherwise
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
"but without the proprietary obstacles that have hindered mobile innovation."

Not surprisingly. Honourable mention goes to this line as well:

"If you’re a developer and this approach sounds exciting, give us a week or so and we’ll have an SDK available."

Damn son, that's some lightning-ass hustling. Like I said, I likely won't get one but it's gonna be a damn interesting 2008.
 

Phat Buddha

TRIBE Member
Google phone' in stores in October

by Charlotte Raab Tue Sep 23, 1:27 PM ET

NEW YORK (AFP) - Internet search leader Google took a giant leap into the mobile phone market on Tuesday, unveiling a handset developed with telecom carrier T-Mobile to compete with Apple's hot-selling iPhone.
ADVERTISEMENT

The T-Mobile G1, the first mobile device powered by Google's open-source Android software, will be available in stores in the United States on October 22 and will cost 179 dollars.

Cole Brodman, T-Mobile chief technology and innovation officer, called the G1, built by the Taiwanese firm HTC, a "game-changing" device which will "power a new mobile Internet of the future."

The G1, which is a bit thicker but slightly narrower than an iPhone, will go on sale in Britain in early November and in other European countries served by T-Mobile, a subsidiary of Germany's Deutsche Telekom AG, in early 2009.

The G1 offers many of the features of the iPhone and Research in Motion's popular BlackBerry including a touch screen similar to that of the iPhone, a trackball for navigation, high-speed Internet browsing, Wi-Fi, e-mail, instant messaging and SMS texting.

It has a 3.0-megapixel camera with photo-sharing capability and a slide-out QWERTY keyboard, a feature lacking on the iPhone.

Internet retail giant Amazon.com announced shortly before the G1 release, in a direct challenge to Apple's iTunes, that the entire catalog of the Amazon MP3 music store would be available on the new phone.

The new phone has, unsurprisingly, been closely integrated with Google applications such as Google Maps and G-Mail and can display videos from YouTube, the video-sharing site purchased by Google in 2006.

"Google's strategy is all about broad reach for their services," said Charles Golvin, an analyst at Forrester Research. "It's just the first step in a long strategic voyage for Google."

Carolina Milanesi, research director at Gartner Consulting, agreed.

"Google is moving into the mobile devices market not to become yet another mobile phone manufacturer but to enable a large addressable market for its services and applications," she said.

"The G1 is the first of a series of devices that will come to market and will be optimized to offer consumers a superior experience when using Google services and applications."

Google hopes the open-source Android software powering the G1 will eventually become the dominant operating system for mobile phones and make handsets compatible with the networks of multiple carriers.

"A developer will be able to use it as a platform," said Andy Rubin, senior director of mobile platforms for Google. "A developer will be able to modify the platform and make it better."

"It's very exciting for me as a computer geek to have a phone that I can play with and modify," said Google co-founder Sergey Brin, who made a surprise appearance at the launch event.

The phone, Google's first foray into the highly competitive mobile phone market, also will allow users to access the Android Market, where they can download software applications from developers around the world.

Google announced the formation in November 2007 of a 34-member group called the "Open Handset Alliance" to develop Android, including China Mobile, HTC, Intel, Motorola, Qualcomm, T-Mobile, Telefonica, LG and eBay.

Google's share price rose by 4.62 percent in New York to 434.76 dollars shortly after the unveiling of the G1.
 

TaCk OnE?

TRIBE Member
the prospect of an open source cell phone platform from which each and every company would build their interface and services from is a great one. And as phones become more and more like PC's a relevant one.

other than that, the press release doesn't really suggest anything new or particularly interesting beyond "improved functionality" with google software....

curious to see what it's actually like.... currently it doesn't strike me as a colossal jump forward, but perhaps a cornerstone in the structure of something that might ultimately be very beneficial.
 
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CiG

TRIBE Member
TaCk OnE? said:
the prospect of an open source cell phone platform from which each and every company would build their interface and services from is a great one. And as phones become more and more like PC's a relevant one.

other than that, the press release doesn't really suggest anything new or particularly interesting beyond "improved functionality" with google software....

curious to see what it's actually like.... currently it doesn't strike me as a colossal jump forward, but perhaps a cornerstone in the structure of something that might ultimately be very beneficial.

It is just a new option in the mobile os market, and the focus is open source. What kind of revolutionary jump forward were you expecting?
 

TaCk OnE?

TRIBE Member
me, none.

just reacting to other comments and the general sentiment that google is some type of miracle company that has come to save humanity from all that is annoying on the internet.
 

gsnuff

TRIBE Promoter
TaCk OnE? said:
..and the general sentiment that google is some type of miracle company that has come to save humanity from all that is annoying...

Yeah, clearly that company is Apple not Google.
 

TaCk OnE?

TRIBE Member
who said that?

I have no oddball brand loyalty angst.

shit is what it is, the sooner people learn to accept that, the sooner they'd stop having arguments over HOW SHIT COMPUTER BRAND X IS YO, or CELLPHONE MODDEL 124 IS FUCKING ASS, FUCKING DIE LOSER SCUM.

right now, to me, the google phone doesn't look very exciting. apple has nothing to do with it.
 
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~atp~

TRIBE Member
I think the marketing of the gphone and its positioning in the marketplace will be more "revolutionary" than the actual technology its bringing. From a scientific perspective, the phone isn't bringing anything fundamentally new; but the weight of its owner, Google, and the publicity of the product is probably going to help popularize the technologies boasted by the phone (it may also help popularize/legitimize the open-source paradigm).

The Symbian OS is almost open-source, the APIs are readily available and just about anyone can jump in and develop software for that operating system (I think Nokia plans to make it 100% open-source in the early part of 2009). The influence that operating system has had on the open-source community has still (in my opinion) been primarily limited to the "tinkerer" market of linux users and so on. So I don't think that what google is bringing is fundamentally new or unprecedented, it will be the mass-market appeal and popularity of Google's advertising campaigns that net "revolutionary" results (maybe :) ).

That aside, the idea of establishing an open-source framework on which to build makes perfect sense, and if we tear a page out of other popular frameworks that follow the open-source model, it's easy to see why. I think that interoperability is increasingly important, and creating open-source platforms or at the very least developer-friendly APIs for communication devices will improve creativity and growth.

There is already a very significant effort being put toward creating a standard development "toolkit" for writing communication device software: SIMS (Semantic Interfaces for Mobile Services). SIMS doesn't encompass an entire API for mobile device development, but it's a good place to start ... and I can guarantee you that open-source development on these APIs will only re-inforce standardization, which will greatly improve interoperability, thus making life easier for all of us.

Also, fuck you Apple.
 
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