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Globalization

2canplay

TRIBE Member
The Globe ran a piece on the newly released Globalization report by a commission sponsored by the International Labour Organization. They set the commission up after the WTO protests and is headed by a 26-member international team of experts.

Conclusion: "deep-seated and persistent imbalances in the current workings of the global economy" remain, which are "ethically unacceptable and politically unsustainable."

Key reccomendations (which made me feel somewhat vindicated because I always tell the first two to anyone who will listen):

1. Focus national economic policies on making "decent work" a priority.
2. Ensure that global trade, finance and investment rules respect CORE LABOUR STANDARDS.(!!!!!)
3.Cut unfair barriers to market access, including a ban on new trade distorting agricultural programs, such as export credits and subsidies, as well as a rapid phase-out of existing programs.(!!!!)
4. Make it easier for poor countries to acquire technology protected by intellectual property rules.
5. Accelerate and deepen debt relief for poorer countries (also backed by Jeffrey Sachs (Columbia) and Friedman (Carnegie-Mellon).
6. Force international organizations to promote ILO's core labour standards. (!!!!!)

What I think one of the main take-aways from this report is the recognition that globalization has the potential to benefit everyone. However, presently formatted, it is falling short of its potential. At present, globalization offers no protection for underdeveloped countries against the monopolistic tendency of Big Capital, which ALL of the developed world had long ago protected its citizens from. Whether it be monopolisitc labour practices (which we protected against in the 1940s) or monopolistic distribution (which we protected in the 1910's, with our Anti-Trust or anti-competition laws), we must enhance the legal position of the worlds poor as soon as possible. Globalization has enormous potential but we must work to extend the protections and social policies which we have on a national level into the global-market that Big Capital now operates. Its no longer useful to think of ourselves as one country with our own set of heteroganeous laws/regulations - its a new world, and people have to wake up to it.
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
I think we have reached the point with globalization that we now need an international labour laws enfocement court and policing standard. Although the country in which the labour is done can set its own laws with regards to labour I believe that enforcement of these laws needs to become third party.

If work was being done according to the laws of most of these countries it wouldn't be so much of a problem. Unfortunately the blind eyes and paid off enforcement allows for some dirty business practices that are hurting us all.

I'm a supporter of both liberalization of farming and of debt relief. However without enforcement of labour standards and development of labour standards I believe we are actually working backwards. Exploitation is not required, nore do I believe it to make long term sense.
 

sarafina

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Ditto Much
IAlthough the country in which the labour is done can set its own laws with regards to labour ...
even if this means they fall below international standards as a way of attracting MNC's??

i have much to say about the "globalization" issue (in fact i just handed in an essay today about ways in which homogenization is promoted, resisted and subverted)
hopefully this thread will develop into a broader discussion of the various issues surrounding the topic :)

Sarah
 

2canplay

TRIBE Member
Me too Sarafina. I'm afraid there isn't enough interest about the issue on this board.

Ditto, I almost entirely agree with your remarks. Re your thoughts on the inablity of underdeveloped nations to eradicate graft and other corruption, let me say that that is not easy. I earned a good appreciation for the power of capitalism when reading early 20th century books on the state of the American economy and political sturctures. Political machines, anti-trust, health and safety violations...everything was for sale in Pre-Rooseveltian America. And that was a country which at the time was then one of the largest industrial countries in the world!!! It took a man of the immense vision of Roosevelt and a World War to finally put the boots to most of the most ruinous types of corruption...although it is now transformed or labelled as corporate malfeasance/corporate greed.;)
 
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sarafina

TRIBE Member
i don't really think that capitalism brought an end to corruption?

and the socialization we receive to overconsume means that the *open* market is really not regulated by the demand of the consumers but by the greed of the producers

Sarah
 

starr

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by 2canplay
Me too Sarafina. I'm afraid there isn't enough interest about the issue on this board.
if you substitute "disagreement" with the word "interest" you may be right.
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
Just finished a wicked article from the latest Harper's about the downfall of Globalization and the re-emergence of Nationalism.

Very good read on this subject. I'm a little too busy right now to compose a full reply to this thread though.

Harpers magazine = awesome.
 

2canplay

TRIBE Member
Unfortunately, I don't think its on line. I think its still on the store shelves...its a cover story and its written by John Raulston-Saul. Interesting, but I'm not a 100% sure I agree with all of his conclusions about the present backlash against globalization. Still a great article and hopefully we see more.
 
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Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Vote Quimby
Got a link to the article Pete?
unfortunately not. they don't publish most of their magazine content online.

2canplay, I agree with you in that he goes out on a few limbs with his theories, but it makes for an interesting read and it's a different perspective than I've read before, which is always refreshing.
 
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