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Getting Fucked by Promoters.... <<outrageous>>

Skipper

TRIBE Member
africa said:
could someone post an example of a gig contract? That would be useful...thx
In this case, I would say just about anything would suffice.
As people have said, an email exchange where she confirmed you were hired, for how long, and what they were going to pay you would be helpful.
 

dyad

TRIBE Member
africa said:
THEN threatened to call the cops if I emailed her or called her....WTF!!!!!!! im sooo mad
did you say or write anything that might come across as threatening or harassing or was this out of the blue? That may be a big factor in whether you should try to persue this.
 

africa

TRIBE Member
dyad said:
did you say or write anything that might come across as threatening or harassing or was this out of the blue? That may be a big factor in whether you should try to persue this.
i called her crooked, and that promoters who pull this shit get a reputation fast....nothing threatening, ya it was totally out of the blue. Like I said, we were supposed to meet at the venue a few days ago, but she forgot about it and never showed up, also the owner didnt even know we were coming
 
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Big Harv

TRIBE Member
It's a long shot - you have an enforceable contract if there is offer, acceptance and consideration. You can argue that they offered to hire you, you accepted and in consideration for the contract you turned down other gigs. Though having it in writing makes proving the contract a lot easier, you can still attempt to sue on the oral contract in small claims court and gamble that they will be scared and want to settle (though hiring a lawyer is probably not worth i if the contract value was only one month's rent). If you are on good terms with the people you turned down for the gig, you can have them act as witnesses to prove that you were relying on the promoter's promise.
 

africa

TRIBE Member
Big Harv said:
It's a long shot - you have an enforceable contract if there is offer, acceptance and consideration. You can argue that they offered to hire you, you accepted and in consideration for the contract you turned down other gigs. Though having it in writing makes proving the contract a lot easier, you can still attempt to sue on the oral contract in small claims court and gamble that they will be scared and want to settle (though hiring a lawyer is probably not worth i if the contract value was only one month's rent). If you are on good terms with the people you turned down for the gig, you can have them act as witnesses to prove that you were relying on the promoter's promise.

thanks, ill likely not pursue this, but i will definitly use written contracts in the future. I am on good terms with the people I had to say no to, but i cant see this going any further... appreciate the advice
 

AshG

Member
dude totally take them to small claims court.
they're very reasonable and i think you'll find these fuckers become a lot more amenable once they realize you've started official proceedings.
 

emiwee

TRIBE Member
Big Harv said:
It's a long shot - you have an enforceable contract if there is offer, acceptance and consideration. You can argue that they offered to hire you, you accepted and in consideration for the contract you turned down other gigs. Though having it in writing makes proving the contract a lot easier, you can still attempt to sue on the oral contract in small claims court and gamble that they will be scared and want to settle (though hiring a lawyer is probably not worth i if the contract value was only one month's rent). If you are on good terms with the people you turned down for the gig, you can have them act as witnesses to prove that you were relying on the promoter's promise.
<3
i was going to write something similar (oh, contracts class). hurray for consideration!
 

PosTMOd

Well-Known TRIBEr
africa said:
...THEN threatened to call the cops if I emailed her or called her....WTF!!!!!!! im sooo mad
She doesn't want an email, for that would mean proof that there was indeed a verbal contract... same with phonecalls...

Lay out a nice email, with all the particulars, very professional, calm, including the dates and times of other communication with her. Most email programs also have an option for a receipt.

Send the email once a day, and one hour after sending it, phone and ask if she received the email. If she does not answer the phone, leave a nice calm message saying that you are phoning to make sure that she received your email... rince and repeat, each time adding onto the email when you sent the previous one and when you phoned to confirm.

This way--if she insists later that she did not get your emails nor phonecalls--you will have a stack of times and dates and whatnot indicating you did your best to contact her, and she will look like a schmuck.
 

judge wopner

TRIBE Member
PosTMOd said:
Also, add in faxes if you feel like it.

call the owner of the club letting them know you were the DJ hired for the event and your advance cheque just bounced, and the promoter informed you they are moving the party to another locale with a different DJ who was cheaper.

just to see if it causes trouble.
 

saskboy

TRIBE Member
africa said:
do verbal contracts hold any relevance?
they are just as valid as written ones, but so much harder to enforce

as well as getting a written contract, another way to protect yourself is to keep a written log of all phone calls and conversations in a bound notebook or diary, be very particular about dates and times, write down every detail in order, these facts can be used as evidence to back up your claims
 

Michlerish

Well-Known TRIBEr
africa said:
laura from singleinthecity.ca

I know her. We work with her occasionally. The girls that run those single events are retarded and sketchy and chain smokers and just general losers. They're not professional either, showing up late, not bringing needed supplies, leaving early without picking up the sheets from all participants... etc.
 
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