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first time golfer tips and other stuff

bArHo

TRIBE Member
So I've decided that the summer '06 would be the year I would try my hand at the game of golf.

SO WHERE DO I EVEN BEGIN TO START?!

Would I need to buy my own equipment as a learner? If so what basics would I need right off? I have a friend who just got promoted to a buyer at golftown here so she's said she'll hook me up with crazy discounts but it needs to be done before I leave mont royal for the summer.

stirfry I'm looking atcha.
 
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stir-fry

TRIBE Member
hey baby.. if you've got golftown at your disposal, i'd go in and hit some clubs and talk with one of the equipment guys there.. they'll definately help you choose clubs that will work for you.

hit as many different clubs as you can, and don't settle until you're happy.

golftown are pretty good with selling people the right equipment, and they won't try to sell you any overpriced junk that you won't like.

ps, patience is key, it's a frustrating game :)
 
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Jeremy Jive

TRIBE Member
Until you are sure that this is going to be something you will do a lot of and frequently, don't spend more than what you are willing to basically just throw away. Good equipment will not help a beginner play any better. Starter sets are usually made with technology them helps improve bad players. These are things like cavity back designs and etc.

Good equipment is expensive and top of the line equipment can run you 3k+ for a full set up.

A starter set can start at $100 and up. You may end up using it once so why spend $500 on it right? If you love it then pawn it off to someone for $50 and put it towards more expensive stuff later on.

Second advice, if you are going to listen to anyone about how to play and how you should set up or swing, let it be a professional. Listening to Johnny 42 handicap buddy is just going to get you started on the wrong road. People get paid to help others learn the game, they are the best place to get started. Don't start bad habits that your friends have just because they say that's the way it's supposed to be done.

For the beginner try and find a cheaper two piece ball that is labelled distance or straight. These are generally harder balls and do not spin as much. Spin increases hooks and slices. This will help to make it more enjoyable in the beginning.

If you are going to buy a putter, try everything and go with whatever feels the most comfortable visually and from feedback. Mallet putters are also more forgiving on bad shots and help to roll the ball straighter.

Stir-fry... anything else to add there?
 

joey

TRIBE Member
i dont know how to make the ball go in the air......

it always just goes along the ground
 
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dicksherwood

TRIBE Member
stir-fry said:
ps, patience is key, it's a frustrating game :)

very, very much so. It's an incredible game and kudos to you for giving it a try, stick with it, golf courses can be beautiful places and you can come across unexpected wildlife, make sure you enjoy these for the first while that you play because your skills will take awhile to catch up to the scenery around you.

Definitely take lessons, play as much as you can, hit the driving range, don't give up no matter how crappy you are and enjoy the outdoors!
 

kmac

TRIBE Member
So I'm going to take lessons this spring and plan on hitting up the driving range and shit, but my biggest fear is going to a course and sucking and having people waiting behind me to take their turn and getting mad at me (the way I get pissed off at families ahead of me when I play putt putt).

Is there somewhere to (or a certain time of day) where I wouldn't have to worry about this?
 

stir-fry

TRIBE Member
kmac, we'll go and play at cresthaven at mccowan and 407 sometime.. it's really cheap and barely ever busy and we won't have to worry about 'weekend pros' playing up our backs all day

(after you get in a few lessons of course) :)
 

Sleepy Giant

TRIBE Member
Jeremy Jive said:
Second advice, if you are going to listen to anyone about how to play and how you should set up or swing, let it be a professional.
This can't be stressed enough. The guys on tour go for 'lessons' all season long.
 

OutcastTO

TRIBE Member
Jeremy Jive said:
To make the ball go up, hit down on the ball. Believe it or not, this is how it works.


and typically this also comes from a "reverse pivot". Weight transfer is a often one of the easiest areas to address and get you on the right path to getting the ball in the air. Most people that hit the ball along the ground are shifting their weight from the front foot to the back foot as they swing through. Your weight should be going the opposite direction and following the head of the club from your back foot to your front.
 
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bArHo

TRIBE Member
thanks for all the help steve & jer. I'm really excited about trying it out, but not so excited about the sucking so badly part.

Exactly how many pieces are in a starter set? Should I wait until I get a taste before investing?

I just found out about some golf lectures at the Muskoka Highlands for newbies like me so I'm going to check them out and try to get some lessons going. woo!
 

Jeremy Jive

TRIBE Member
No one person can tell you what to get. An educated person can help you narrow down the options to what will work best for you. What you end up with should be a combination of having the right technology in it and what is the most comfortable for you. If something is right for you but you don't like the way it looks or feels then it will never do any good. It's a game of skill and confidence.

Just don't make the mistake of going broke before you know you are going to use your investment. Clubs mayb expensive but not as much as spending $50-$150 a day playing a round.

There is such a buzz in promoting womens golf that most places offer free clinics for women to get them into the game. Go and try one, learn some basics and have fun.
 

kmac

TRIBE Member
stir-fry said:
kmac, we'll go and play at cresthaven at mccowan and 407 sometime.. it's really cheap and barely ever busy and we won't have to worry about 'weekend pros' playing up our backs all day

(after you get in a few lessons of course) :)

Awesome. You'd have the patience to deal with a newbie?

I can't help but recall when my snowboard pro ex took me out on the slopes and abandoned me on the bunny hill after one run.

"Fuck this, I'm out. See you in five hours!"
 

Jeremy Jive

TRIBE Member
kmac said:
Awesome. You'd have the patience to deal with a newbie?
Steve has plenty of patience. Playing with newbies is fun. You don't have to keep score and the only aim is to have fun and goof off.
 

MissBlu

TRIBE Member
Great advice in here...
The main thing is to have fun. Take lessons, get out to the driving range.

I find that if you go later in the day, or on weeknights, you eliminate frustrating people who want to go fast. If you are out, and someone is behind and bugging ya, I would just let them play through.
 
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SJN

TRIBE Member
Already mentioned by a few people, but my #1 piece of advice for any beginner is:

GET LESSONS NOW
And I mean RIGHT NOW. Like, before you even go to the range or course for the first time. Bad habits form very quickly and are very hard to break. If you're still playing in 10 years, you will be very thankful you learned the game properly to begin with.
 

SJN

TRIBE Member
MissBlu said:
If you are out, and someone is behind and bugging ya.
If someone is behing and bugging ya, it means you're playing too slow.

To that end, Tip #2:
Keeping pace means keeping up with the group in front of you, NOT playing just fast enough to stay ahead of the group behind you.
 

bArHo

TRIBE Member
SJN said:
Already mentioned by a few people, but my #1 piece of advice for any beginner is:

GET LESSONS NOW
And I mean RIGHT NOW. Like, before you even go to the range or course for the first time. Bad habits form very quickly and are very hard to break. If you're still playing in 10 years, you will be very thankful you learned the game properly to begin with.

While I would like to start the game now I'm dealing with finishing up school and working on a pile of projects that take up a good chunk of my energy, patience and day, ontop of which I have to start packing for my move at the end of next month. It'll have to wait until may. boo.
 
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Fillmore

TRIBE Member
My only advice for new golfers as I am one is to RELAX. If you can stay relaxed you will have a great time. Dont worry about the guy in front of you or the guys shooting after you. Worry about your shot and your shot only. Have fun with the shots you totally shank.

Other than that keep your eye on the ball.
 

Prickly Pete

TRIBE Member
First thing: Find out which way feels comfortable to swing. My dad shoots left handed, swings a bat left handed, yet for whatever reason, swings a golf club right handed cause that feels comfortable. I'd recommend going to a range with a friend and try hitting both ways.

Clubs: Go to crappy tire and buy their cheap ass $100 starter set. You are gonna suck your first year and the clubs or balls will not help you. A starter set usually has a driver, 3 wood, 3, 5, 7, and 9 irons plus a putter.

Go get a lesson. Find out the correct way to swing. Professionals will tell you how to swing. If not, you will end up with a swing like mine where it might work, but is not the correct way. It will frustrate you to no end once you understand golf.

Once you know how to swing. Hit the range. A lot. Like 2 to 3 times a week. Golf is the ultimate sport of practice. The more you play the better you get. Ask Stir-fry steve how much better he got once he started playing all the time.

Once you feel comfortable hitting the ball, go with a friend to a course. Play at twilight when there is less pressure to perform well. I would recommend a saturday or sunday evening. Weeknights are still a little crazy cause nutcases like us try and fit around in between the time I get off work and when the sun goes down. On the weekend, people like me golf early and the beginner types usually golf late. Less pressure (In reality though, you paid your money like every other fucker out there so I would play whenever I wanted to).

Can't stress enough, its a frustrating game when you start, but the more you play, the better you get.

Edit: Clubs: You can probably go to a garage sale and get a set of clubs on the cheap. That is how I bought my first set 20 years ago. They drivers were even wooden.
 

The Tesseract

TRIBE Member
When you swing, keep your head down.
In swinging, when you bring the club back, your chin should touch your shoulder. When you swing, your chin should touch the opposite shoulder.

Don't worry about your long game - it takes years to get a good swing working. If you can, master the Pitching wedge (PW) or the 9iron.

I can't begin to tell you guys how many times the Pitching Wedge has saved my butt.
 
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