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Fall Motorcycle Thread

Rocky

TRIBE Member
My neighbour has a VFR800. He's dropped it twice and had to have parts replaced and some paint jobs. Now he refuses to ride it for fear of dropping it again.

I've done all of my maintenance on my bike, despite not really knowing what I am doing. Seems to be working out OK. I've put 40,000km on it since the rebuild (after the accident), so maybe I have some idea of what I am doing.
 
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Rocky

TRIBE Member
Still out on the bike. It's my only mode of transportation right now. Girlfriend just bought a car today, so still need a few days to pick it up. It's a good ting because it might be a bit cold for riding by week's end.
 

Rocky

TRIBE Member
Can anyone recommend a good injector cleaner? I want to try a fuel additive before I manually remove the injectors and clean them myself.

Has anyone tried Sea Foam Motor Treatment?
 
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shanekingsley

TRIBE Member
I have used seafoam on my older carbed bikes, but never on a bike that had FI. I poured 1/2 a can in the gas tank and ran through a tank of gas. Then repeated again the next tank of gas. It took me 2 weeks to burn through the 2 tanks of gas, so it sat in tank, carbs and fuel lines, eating away at all the crud that had built up. This was years ago, but I recall that the exhaust was white (ish) at first and then returned to normal very shortly afterwards.

I used it because the bikes were not stored properly for several winters and had sputtering issues. After using the issues were gone. Apparently it's also good to use every now and then with all the ethanol we have in gasoline.
 

djfear

TRIBE Member
I would still be riding in this weather, but putting the bike away probably around December until beginning of April. ... still waiting on my insurance to be processed since a not-at-fault accident a week ago.
 

Rocky

TRIBE Member
I have used seafoam on my older carbed bikes, but never on a bike that had FI. I poured 1/2 a can in the gas tank and ran through a tank of gas. Then repeated again the next tank of gas. It took me 2 weeks to burn through the 2 tanks of gas, so it sat in tank, carbs and fuel lines, eating away at all the crud that had built up. This was years ago, but I recall that the exhaust was white (ish) at first and then returned to normal very shortly afterwards.

I used it because the bikes were not stored properly for several winters and had sputtering issues. After using the issues were gone. Apparently it's also good to use every now and then with all the ethanol we have in gasoline.
I just threw half a bottle into 19.5 liters of fuel yesterday.

I've been dealing with some jerkiness, most noticeably in first gear at around 50 kph. I am not sure if this is just the 990 snatchy throttle that many owners speak about, but I didn't really notice it until around 50,000 km. It could be that I just became more sensitive to it.

Since, I've changed fuel filters, air filters, put a new chain on, new spark plugs, and performed a valve adjustment. I performed all of this at their proper maintenance schedule. But, specifically, the one time I took my bike to a KTM mechanic, they were sure that I needed new clutch plates. After spending $400 for new ones to be installed, they realized that it wasn't the clutch plates (this is why I don't go to mechanics).

I'm thinking about going back to the previous fuel map, which wasn't the correct map for by bike and stock exhausts, but I am not sure if that will solve the issue. I will balance the throttle bodies during my next service, and, if that doesn't solve it, I am not going to worry about it too much. A lot of guys say it is normal, and maybe it is that I had just not noticed it before.
 

the_fornicator

TRIBE Member
Another + for seafoam. Never used it on a bike cause it's always maintained (pretty much gets a tear down every winter), but I've used it a lot on higher mileage vehicles.

1/3 of the can in the crankcase (directly in the engine oil), 1/3 can in the gas tank, and 1/3 the can through the brake MC vacuum lines.

Take the thing for the most spirited rip you've ever been on until you don't see any more white smoke and then change the oil.
 

litespeed

Well-Known TRIBEr
im still riding daily and will be until the temperature starts getting closer to zero daily. would rather ride to work than subway!
 
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djfear

TRIBE Member
Mods n Rockers Toronto 2014 - The Biggest Classic Motorcycle & Scooter Culture Fest of the Year

mods & rockers is back this year this Friday @ Town Moto, and Saturday there's a cross town ride. I'll be hitting up Friday for sure.
One of the people I was with for this event in August had a really bad not-at-fault accident on his way home that Friday night and he's now paralyzed from the waist down as far as I know. He was in hospital for months for brain injury and lower spinal damage.

He's going to have a fundraiser on the 28th in Burlington for his family in a comedy club. Shit like this makes me tripped out about motorcycle riding, especially having my own not-at-fault spill a month ago (I'm fine).

Anyone here give up riding, or consider it after experiencing or hearing about things like that? I know I will still ride, but my own accident has me more focused on having high quality gear on, and I'm only interested in riding motorcycles with the latest in safety tech, e.g. modern suspension, brakes, and tires now. I don't think I would do a cafe build unless it was a modern one.
 

Rocky

TRIBE Member
I don't think I'd ever stop riding.

I can only make sure that I don't drive like an idiot (like I see a lot of crotch-rocket riders doing) and to focus on road awareness, especially assuming that the driver of another vehicle is oblivious. Also, full, quality motorcycle gear is essential. I was relatively unharmed after the one accident I was in due to the quality of my motorcycle gear, even though we were thrown from the bike. I also try to avoid riding at night-time if at all possible.

Even though the rates are much lower for automobiles, stories of death an paralysis from automobile accidents don't usually lead to thoughts of quitting driving.

It sucks that other drivers tend to suck so much. Even with all the precautions, you could still end up in a bad accident. For me, the risk of having that happen does not outweigh the reward of riding.
 

djfear

TRIBE Member
I don't think I'd ever stop riding.

I can only make sure that I don't drive like an idiot (like I see a lot of crotch-rocket riders doing) and to focus on road awareness, especially assuming that the driver of another vehicle is oblivious. Also, full, quality motorcycle gear is essential. I was relatively unharmed after the one accident I was in due to the quality of my motorcycle gear, even though we were thrown from the bike. I also try to avoid riding at night-time if at all possible.

Even though the rates are much lower for automobiles, stories of death an paralysis from automobile accidents don't usually lead to thoughts of quitting driving.

It sucks that other drivers tend to suck so much. Even with all the precautions, you could still end up in a bad accident. For me, the risk of having that happen does not outweigh the reward of riding.
I too believe that the risks do not outweigh the reward of riding. You have to enjoy life to the fullest and there is that risk factor that we all accept. Hell, you could risk dying by sitting in front of the computer for 18 hours of the day playing video games!
 
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OwenThomas

TRIBE Promoter
Went for a 30 min ride each way yesterday. Temps were about 0-1ish with little chance of any ice on the roads after the thaw and salting.

Highway was brisk! Definitely need to get some wind guards on my bars. Will look a bit funny on the ninja 500 but it's an ugly assed bike to start.

Will probably ride to work later but that's only 8 mins through the city.
 
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shanekingsley

TRIBE Member
Anyone here give up riding, or consider it after experiencing or hearing about things like that? I know I will still ride, but my own accident has me more focused on having high quality gear on, and I'm only interested in riding motorcycles with the latest in safety tech, e.g. modern suspension, brakes, and tires now. I don't think I would do a cafe build unless it was a modern one.
I've been involved in a few exciting moments. While I the latest mechanical advancements are good, I would prefer to be a more alert and skilled rider and focus a lot on that. Having things like ABS or traction control can certainly help as well as good brakes, tires etc, but it's always important to put as much stock into having good observational awareness (and riding technique to match). For gear, I buy the best I can afford at the time and keep a look out for sales. This year I started riding with one of those Motoport kevlar suits and it is the most comfortable piece of gear I have. Very expensive, but very tough, durable, breathable and machine washable. There were many times before when I would not ride with proper gear, but those days are no longer.

How did you deal with the wind? Lobo
Having a bike with smaller fairings (or naked) often helps by not allowing the bike to act like a sail in the wind. A lighter bike will also typically feel like it is getting pushed around in the wind proportionally easier. A windshield helps a huge amount with the amount of wind resistance that your body and head/neck have to deal with.

When riding in heavier winds, one important thing to do is to not tense up your arms and lock your elbows. The bike will want to move around and the more relaxed your body position is, the more you will be able to freely react to the movements of the bike. Further to that, relaxed arms (and legs) also act as shock absorbers for when the bike goes over bumps. So keeping the elbows relaxed, the wrists neutral and the balls of your feet on the pegs will help to mitigate any unexpected bumps that should pop up. A common mistake is to ride with incorrect body position when riding under adverse circumstances (ie wind), opening the way for other problems to be more serious.

Wearing fitted gear will also help. My first season riding, I rode with a big, heavy leather jacket and the wind used to throw me around quite a bit because it was not as tight fitting as it should have been for the purpose of riding. Riding on the highway took some serious effort. I have a bunch of different jackets now, but all are moto specific, and they fit well when riding at speed.

All that said, I have been out on straight roads while it has been very windy, and it felt like the bike was at a 45deg angle just to ride in a straight line. It can be tough and it feels like fighting to stay upright. I can't imagine what it must be like across the prairies or mid-west with the wind speeds they get out there. Sometimes it's time to recognize the risks and park it.
Went for a 30 min ride each way yesterday. Temps were about 0-1ish with little chance of any ice on the roads after the thaw and salting. Highway was brisk! Definitely need to get some wind guards on my bars. Will look a bit funny on the ninja 500 but it's an ugly assed bike to start.
Check out heated gear if you have not already - it's awesome! I have a pair of hippo hands I need to try and rig up to my bike - probably just as ugly as wind guards on your bike, but whatever works!
 
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djfear

TRIBE Member
I've been involved in a few exciting moments. While I the latest mechanical advancements are good, I would prefer to be a more alert and skilled rider and focus a lot on that. Having things like ABS or traction control can certainly help as well as good brakes, tires etc, but it's always important to put as much stock into having good observational awareness (and riding technique to match). For gear, I buy the best I can afford at the time and keep a look out for sales. This year I started riding with one of those Motoport kevlar suits and it is the most comfortable piece of gear I have. Very expensive, but very tough, durable, breathable and machine washable. There were many times before when I would not ride with proper gear, but those days are no longer.
See, I'm always 100% mentally alert anytime I'm on the bike, and in the city there's no room for relaxing. When I had u-turn lady come out in front of me, the other driver had absolutely no regard for checking for oncoming traffic and if I was a car and wasn't alert then her passenger would probably be dead. It's at points like those where your skill & alertness (I was going 35-40km in a 50km) can only get you so far, and now you're dependent on traction and technology to keep your bike upright and stopping in an optimal amount of time.
 
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