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Everyone should watch "The National" on CBC at 10pm tonight

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
RCMP visited me in Kabul: Khadr
Son of family with ties to Al Qaeda passed polygraph tests on key parts of story


FROM CANADIAN PRESS

A Canadian who admitted his family has had links to Al Qaeda says he was recruited to work for the CIA, the FBI and the U.S. military in Afghanistan and later at the U.S. prison facility in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

In an interview that was airing on CBC-TV's The National tonight, Abdurahman Khadr said he was so frightened after his capture by U.S. forces, he agreed to live for nine months in a CIA safe house near the American embassy in Kabul.

Key elements of Khadr's story were subjected to polygraph tests and he passed, the network said.

Khadr told the CBC he conducted what became known as "the Abdurahman Tour" in Kabul.

"I took the people from the CIA, the FBI, the military," he told CBC in transcripts provided to The Canadian Press.

"We'd go around in a car in Kabul and show them the houses of Al Qaeda people, the guest houses, the safe houses. . . . I just told them what I knew."

The Khadr family has long denied ties to Al Qaeda but admitted in interviews aired Wednesday they are not only terrorists but believe it's noble for them to die for the cause.

Abdurahman Khadr admitted that his father and some of his brothers fought as Al Qaeda terrorists and that they even stayed with Osama bin Laden.

And his mother and sister, interviewed in Pakistan, said they were proud of their family's connection to the terrorists behind the September 2001 attacks.

The 21-year-old man, who was returned to Canada last year, said he was visited by four RCMP police officers from Toronto and Ottawa while at the safe house in Kabul.

"They had me swear on the Koran that I would tell them the truth, the whole truth," he said. "They started asking me questions about my father, the organization he was working for, how he was connected to Al Qaeda."

They also asked about other family members over two days, he said, then thanked him.

"They told me . . . `you've been very co-operative. You've told us everything you knew. We think we can trust you and we're going to go back to Canada. And the minute we get there we're going to try our best to get you back."'

He said he didn't hear from the Canadians for another 18 months. He assumed they had abandoned him. Meanwhile, he said the CIA made him an offer.

"They brought me a paper," he said. "They said $5,000 bonus `for you being very co-operative and from now on just by working with us, just answering our questions, you get paid $3,000 a month, until you stop working for us.'

"The paper said I would get paid until someone found out about this. Now the account was under my name. It was a CIA account somewhere. I don't know where. But the money went to my account. And whenever I want my money I can ask for it."

He said he worked for the CIA in Kabul for about nine months until his favourite agent, a woman, told him he'd be going to Cuba undercover and treated just like any other prisoner.

"For three months I was in general population," Khadr told the CBC. "Their hope was when they take me to Cuba they could put me next to anyone that was stubborn and that wouldn't talk and, you know, I would talk him into it.

"Well, it's not that easy, first thing, because lots of people won't talk to anyone because everybody in Cuba is scared of the person next to him. I couldn't do a lot for them."

He said he was almost at the point of suicide when he asked to be removed from the prison camp. He said he was transferred to more luxurious quarters and given access to doctors for five months.

He said the CIA considered several international destinations to gather information about Islamic radicals. Then the focus moved to Al Qaeda activity in Iraq and Bosnia.

Last September, Khadr said, the CIA provided him with a training course in undercover work, then he was given a false passport and sent to Bosnia, where he was to blend in with the transient Muslim population in Sarajevo.

He was in Bosnia when news arrived of the military attack in Pakistan which killed his father, Ahmed Said Khadr. Abdurahman says he had long resented his father for dragging the whole family into the world of Al Qaeda.

He said after his first week in Bosnia, the CIA asked him to actually volunteer to go into Iraq with Al Qaeda forces so that he could funnel information to the U.S. military. They told him it would be dangerous.

Khadr said he was afraid and called his grandmother in Toronto, telling her that he desperately wanted to come back to Canada. He told her to announce in the media that the Canadian government was not helping him.

After the news broke in Canada, he said he was brought to a CIA safe house in Sarajevo, where the Americans agreed to let him go back to Canada, and he promised he would not tell anyone of his CIA dealings.

He said the CIA took away all the things they had bought him and dropped him off at the Canadian embassy.

Khadr's 57-year-old father was born in Egypt but became a Canadian citizen. He was killed fighting Pakistani forces in October. One of his sons, 14-year-old Karim was wounded in the battle and is paralysed in a Pakistani military hospital.

Another son, Omar, was captured by U.S. forces after an attack in Afghanistan and is being held at Guantanamo Bay.

Abdurahman Khadr says he wants to be a peaceful Muslim.

Said Khadr: "I want everybody to know what happened."

A spokeswoman for Foreign Affairs said she was aware of the Khadrs' admissions and that members of the Khadr family are still entitled to their rights as Canadians.
"All members of this family are Canadian citizens and Canadian citizens have basic rights, including access to appropriate consular assistance when outside of Canada," said Kimberly Phillips.

That riled Conservative public security critic Kevin Sorenson.

"It boils down to national security issues. I really think that there are so many people who are legitimate refugees who would love to be in our country; there are so many people who would love to be landed immigrants, who would love to contribute, that people who associate themselves with terrorism just aren't welcome here."

He said people with ties to terrorism should be refused Canadian citizenship.

"I think we have to be very frank and very open with them - if you associate with people who are bent on terrorist principles; if you associate with people who think it's all right to have suicide bombers that watch videos of the crashes into the World Trade Centre, we don't want you here in this country."


http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/Co...747&call_pageid=968332188492&col=968793972154


more information from the cbc website here
 
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OTIS

TRIBE Member
It also repeats on 99.1 in audio in the morning post 8:30 AM.

It's an amazing story. GO CBC GO!
 
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Spinsah

TRIBE Member
that's because the cbc is a waste of tax payer's money and should be privatized, sterilized and destroyed.
 
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Evil Dynovac

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Spinsah
that's because the cbc is a waste of tax payer's money and should be privatized, sterilized and destroyed.
I can't see any reason to disagree with you.

Why is the government in the business of making poor television shows or showing re-runs of The Simpsons for that matter?

Does the CBC turn a profit? Does it run entirely on advertising dollars or do they get an allowance from the government.

TV money should be going to schools or public programs, no?
 

noodle

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Evil Dynovac
I can't see any reason to disagree with you.

Why is the government in the business of making poor television shows or showing re-runs of The Simpsons for that matter?

Does the CBC turn a profit? Does it run entirely on advertising dollars or do they get an allowance from the government.

TV money should be going to schools or public programs, no?
CBC does not turn a profit. They run the Simpsons only as way to generate much needed revenue to run the place.

Despite what you believe people do watch the CBC. Although the numbers aren't as great as a "commercial" station like CTV, millions (yes millions) of people find the CBC an asset to Canadian culture (countless polls and surveys prove that the majority of Canadians value the CBC).

I'm not going to defend the quality of the of the dramas that are produced (although divinci's was HUGE in it's heyday), but at least we have a place for Canadian productions to a least have a chance.

CBC comedy and news production is HIGHLY acclaimed. Sure it has it's up and downs, but hey, that's entertainment.

And what about cbc radio? The morning show is #1 in Toronto and numerous other communities across Canada. Not to mention CBC.CA has just been named the #1 Internet site Canadians go to for news and information.

Privatizing the CBC would totally jeopardize Canadian's having a place for reliable, IMPARITAL programming that, like or not, is DISTINCLTY Canadian.
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Evil Dynovac
Why is the government in the business of making poor television shows or showing re-runs of The Simpsons for that matter?
The government doesn't own it. You do. It's a public asset.

Originally posted by Evil Dynovac
Does the CBC turn a profit?
It's not part of it’s mandate to turn a profit. And I wouldn’t want it to. It’s abundantly clear how the profit motive can get in the way of journalistic integrity.

Originally posted by Evil Dynovac
Does it run entirely on advertising dollars or do they get an allowance from the government.
CBC Radio has no advertising. CBC TV does have some, but it’s mostly paid for out of the public purse.
 

noodle

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by OTIS


CBC Radio has no advertising. CBC TV does have some, but it’s mostly paid for out of the public purse.
Neither does CBC.CA, which has the biggest audience base out of all three services.
 
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sputnik

TRIBE Member
To add my 2 cents, what commercial television station would dedicate an entire day of programming to small town hockey, putting towns such as Hay River, NWT on national tv? For many small communities, especially in the north, the CBC is the only link the rest of Canada.

CBC recently broadcast their nightly news from Afganistan, spending time with the Canadian troops, passing messages home, showing Canadians the day to day lives of soldiers. No commercial station would do this.

Also, in many towns, the CBC is the only radio and television station people can receive.

Then there's the only quality mainstream radio station in Toronto, Radio 1. And have you ever listened to Radio 2 at night? They play an incredible variety of music - that you would NEVER hear on a commercial station.

For this, Canadians pay roughly 30 bucks a year each.

We need the CBC now, more than ever, as the quantity of US programming threatens to swamp us.

That's what I think,
Paul
 

~atp~

TRIBE Member
lol...so fucking stupid. Money is the opiate of the masses. Or no wait, that's religion. Everything has to make a profit, or else you aren't being efficient, and in a free market, loss of efficiency is a loss in welfare for...everyone...right? ;)
 

noodle

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by sputnik

For this, Canadians pay roughly 30 bucks a year each.

$29 to be exact.

Almost everybody pays around $250 (canadian) in the UK for the BBC and look what they're able to do with that money (plus the money the get from parliment). They're able to produce some of the best television/radio/on line programming in the WORLD. The Beeb is the pride and joy of the UK (despite the recent scandals) and brits have NO PROBLEM forking over their licence fee. They realize commercial-free quality costs money.
 
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