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Erick Morrillo arrested for cocaine possession

coleridge

TRIBE Member
ev said:
whatever.. when you're making 10-40 grand per weekend, you can take off the other 5 days in the week. That's better then spending 40 hours per week at some shitty job that pays you 40-50k per year... and one who says other wise is whack.

I know if quite a few BIG DJs that are married and have families.

Sure they travel a lot and may miss some stuff, but when you're making 10-40k per week or more, your wife doesn't have to work, and you can afford hired help for when you're not around... and you can provide your family with the things that most people could never have.. not to mention ensure their future wealth.
If you're in Morillo's pay bracket sure, it can be alright. When your kids get to the age that they are in school then at least you can take some weekends off to be with them.

But if you're a working DJ pulling down a decent living but HAVE to travel every weekend to take every gig you can get ...that's a brutal lifestyle for anybody who has commitments to anybody other than themselves.
 

geminigirl

TRIBE Member
Spinsah said:
...But in general, as we get older those people who are working in the business into their 30's I am starting to feel sorry for. Especially promoters. I cannot think of anything more depressing than having to be at the same club week in and week out, pretending to be excited for events and having a facebook status that only announces the next party they are throwing.

That is not a job I envy one bit.
I so agree.

I was in the rave/club scene for so many years. By 33(now 35), I was pretty done. Not that I don't miss it. I just couldn't imagine going to clubs weekly now. Time to grow up.
 
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poker face

TRIBE Member
Hey I woulden't mind traveling around the world and getting paid for it. You would just have to be smart about it which I don't think I have the will power.
 
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diablo

TRIBE Member
Spinsah said:
I feel you.

Going out to hear music you really want to jam to is still one of my favourite things to do, and fortunately this happens mostly outside of the capital 'C' Clubs these days. But in general, as we get older those people who are working in the business into their 30's I am starting to feel sorry for. Especially promoters. I cannot think of anything more depressing than having to be at the same club week in and week out, pretending to be excited for events and having a facebook status that only announces the next party they are throwing.

That is not a job I envy one bit.
Oh man...totally.

It depresses me that I can't muster the enthusiasm for most aspects of "the business" that I once could.

It really is unfortunate that anyone who wants to be a DJ and/or producer pretty much *HAS* to be a fairly serious event promoter as well. IMO, it's one of the reasons - apart from the natural popularity arc of any genre/trend - that "the scene" fizzled; when everyone was a DJ that only went to events thrown by themselves and their clique, no events got serious support, and eventually most people involved got sick of the whole thing. You need a few punters to make the whole thing work.

I like to think that I'll still be making music in ten years (I just turned 28), but realistically, it's hard to imagine doing one without doing the other. I know that I don't want to be the 38-year-old in a record label t-shirt pumping his fist behind the decks LOL
 

WestsideWax

TRIBE Promoter
diablo said:
I know that I don't want to be the 38-year-old in a record label t-shirt pumping his fist behind the decks LOL
Minus the record label t-shirt, why not? Some of the best d.j.s in the world are over 40 - Francois Kevorkian, an amazing talent who's still going strong, is in his mid-50s!

Don't knock it until you're there yourself - just because there are burnouts and casualties, doesn't mean there aren't happy success stories along the way, too!
 

AshG

Member
as long as you love what you do and are passionate about it, who cares?

i'm just getting into making music now and i can't see NOT being interested in music by such and such an age. that just seems like an artificial barrier erected by whatever society has to say about what constitutes a 'sensible' thing to do.

fuck it, you live once.
 

diablo

TRIBE Member
WestsideWax said:
Minus the record label t-shirt, why not? Some of the best d.j.s in the world are over 40 - Francois Kevorkian, an amazing talent who's still going strong, is in his mid-50s!
Again, if you're making thousands for each gig and playing to packed mega-clubs in exotic locales with your face on 10,000 posters all over town, then yeah, I'm sure it can be quite fun...especially if you can pick and choose your gigs.

It's a different story if you're DJ/producer X of small-time label ABC Records earning 50 cents per download and taking the Greyhound to your next gig at some shithole club in Buffalo or Winnipeg.

And yes, there are different measures of success and many people have passion blah blah blah. My point is that it's easy to "have passion" when you're Tiesto or Louie Vega or David Morales and the world is your oyster. It's much harder to have passion when it only gets harder to follow your passion due to age, changing tastes and a disappearing business model.
 
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AshG

Member
depends on what your'e passionate about. if its the excitement of a necessarily massive crowd staring you in the face and 5-star hotels, then sure.

if its passion for the music, and you can swing it financially, i don't see any problem at all.

that's the beautiful thing about doing music as a personal interest rather than a fucking job. you quit jobs, you never quit personal interests.
 

diablo

TRIBE Member
AshG said:
if its passion for the music, and you can swing it financially, i don't see any problem at all.
Therein lies the rub!


AshG said:
that's the beautiful thing about doing music as a personal interest rather than a fucking job. you quit jobs, you never quit personal interests.
Well, yeah. However, it's hard to maintain that "personal interest" unless you're fairly serious about the promotion side of it.

Sure, any 35-year-old ex-raver can make tunes and post them on MySpace. Whether anyone cares is another matter, which is a large part of what drives an artist, no? A 20-year-old playing house music in some dive club on a Friday night seems categorically less ridiculous than a 40-year-old with two kids that need to go to soccer practice in the morning doing the same thing. Some people won't care, but I think most would eventually.
 

ian

TRIBE Member
Not every DJ wants to be a globe trotting superstar. I've had plenty of offers in the years past to play in England and Germany, and around Canada (oddly enough never the US) and I usually turn them down. I really just like playing at home here in Toronto for my friends.
 

AshG

Member
diablo said:
Therein lies the rub!




Well, yeah. However, it's hard to maintain that "personal interest" unless you're fairly serious about the promotion side of it.

Sure, any 35-year-old ex-raver can make tunes and post them on MySpace. Whether anyone cares is another matter, which is a large part of what drives an artist, no? A 20-year-old playing house music in some dive club on a Friday night seems categorically less ridiculous than a 40-year-old with two kids that need to go to soccer practice in the morning doing the same thing. Some people won't care, but I think most would eventually.
who cares if anyone cares about your music?
i want to make music for its own sake, because of a personal interest in it.

that it would ever be played in front of anyone is an entirely diff thing and not the least bit important to me. there is a huge diff between making music simply to function as a means to sell yourself and making music because of, and for, the music itself.

as far as the djing goes, as long as the people you're playing to are appreciative of it, who cares what or where it is? one of the funnest gigs i've ever played was last year at a hole in the wall, mixing rock, reggae, frank sinatra, whatever, to an audience of about 4 or 5, who were having the time of their lives, and as was i. i've played in much larger clubs, in much more 'happening' places, and at times got paid a lot of money to do it, but it didn't mean any more to me than that night, and in most cases, it meant less.

anyway, how 'ridiculous' that is, is a matter of perception of the dj. personally i couldn't give a shit if anyone thinks its this or that as far as what constitutes reasonable behaviour wrt age or anything else for that matter. i've got a career that finances my life just fine. the music is a diff kind of passion.
 

diablo

TRIBE Member
ian said:
Not every DJ wants to be a globe trotting superstar. I've had plenty of offers in the years past to play in England and Germany, and around Canada (oddly enough never the US) and I usually turn them down. I really just like playing at home here in Toronto for my friends.
...and you were heavily involved in event promotion for what, ten years? Fifteen?

It's not even about being a superstar. Just to break through from barely-breaking-even to some measure of "success" takes a huge amount of work, whether as a DJ, producer, or label. Even if someone doesn't care about being a globe-trotting superstar, it gets hard to justify/manage DJing/etc from a financial and time-required point of view once one is past say, university age, and definitely once one is into their thirties with a family/mortgage/etc. Not saying that it can't be done, as I'm still fighting the good fight, but it definitely becomes a bit more of a labour of love as opposed to an unrestrained passion that takes a hold of you.

Once you stop caring about "success" on some level, it's only a short leap to "Why do I bother?" Let's be honest here...given the choice between playing to 20 people in some dive on Queen West and the club of the moment in Ibiza, I think it's obvious which one most of us would choose. No one gets into "the arts" (in any measure) because they want to be broke and unknown.
 
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AshG

Member
diablo said:
Once you stop caring about "success" on some level, it's only a short leap to "Why do I bother?" Let's be honest here...given the choice between playing to 20 people in some dive on Queen West and the club of the moment in Ibiza, I think it's obvious which one most of us would choose. No one gets into "the arts" (in any measure) because they want to be broke and unknown.
not for me. not when 'success' means creating something i, and others, can enjoy. i love learning and creating new things, and when that thing also embodies emotional passion, then there is no greater success that i can imagine.
 

Lysistrata

Well-Known TRIBEr
diablo said:
...and you were heavily involved in event promotion for what, ten years? Fifteen?

It's not even about being a superstar. Just to break through from barely-breaking-even to some measure of "success" takes a huge amount of work, whether as a DJ, producer, or label. Even if someone doesn't care about being a globe-trotting superstar, it gets hard to justify/manage DJing/etc from a financial and time-required point of view once one is past say, university age, and definitely once one is into their thirties with a family/mortgage/etc. Not saying that it can't be done, as I'm still fighting the good fight, but it definitely becomes a bit more of a labour of love as opposed to an unrestrained passion that takes a hold of you.

Once you stop caring about "success" on some level, it's only a short leap to "Why do I bother?" Let's be honest here...given the choice between playing to 20 people in some dive on Queen West and the club of the moment in Ibiza, I think it's obvious which one most of us would choose. No one gets into "the arts" (in any measure) because they want to be broke and unknown.
nobody should get into the arts unless they're willing to be at least somewhat broke and unkown. the "starving artist" as a well-known archetype/phrase.

and as many peeps have said, if you have money coming in from a "day job" then you have the freedom to do what you want with your art - instead of trying to make something that will be popular (and therefore most likely craptastic.)
 

jazzsax

TRIBE Member
diablo said:
It's a different story if you're DJ/producer X of small-time label ABC Records earning 50 cents per download and taking the Greyhound to your next gig at some shithole club in Buffalo or Winnipeg.
Ahahahaha, ahahahah, ahhahahaha, so true. Winnipeg, such a bad place to try and be a promoter of electronic events. Though one promoter has finally made a good go at it, it took crossing over into the mainstream to get the support.

1999-2001 were good years though!
 

djglobalkiller

TRIBE Promoter
jazzsax said:
Ahahahaha, ahahahah, ahhahahaha, so true. Winnipeg, such a bad place to try and be a promoter of electronic events. Though one promoter has finally made a good go at it, it took crossing over into the mainstream to get the support.

1999-2001 were good years though!

i remember playing in winnipeg and the party being pretty cool! lots of fun, even the afterparty was awesomesauce!
 
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diablo

TRIBE Member
AshG said:
not for me. not when 'success' means creating something i, and others, can enjoy.
Well there you go...sharing your passion with others is what makes it great. Playing your heart out to an empty room sucks, no matter how great your tunes are.


Lysistrata said:
nobody should get into the arts unless they're willing to be at least somewhat broke and unkown. the "starving artist" as a well-known archetype/phrase.
Being a "starving artist" is not the goal of any artist that I've ever met. It's a sacrifice, not the intended outcome!

There are starving athletes, too. It doesn't mean that they got into their chosen craft with that in mind!


Lysistrata said:
and as many peeps have said, if you have money coming in from a "day job" then you have the freedom to do what you want with your art - instead of trying to make something that will be popular (and therefore most likely craptastic.)
The point is that if you're not getting *some* type of return (for lack of a better word) for your efforts, whether in terms of $$$ or recognition/following, then why do it at all? The very fact that someone is making their artistic creation available to the public, whether it be via a nightclub DJ booth, music store, concert, website, theatre, etc suggests that they are looking for one or both of the above methods of "return". If someone was making music just for themselves with no care for what anyone else likes/accepts/dances to/purchases, then they would more than likely keep it to themselves. There is no shame in wanting others to enjoy your artistic endeavours; it's what makes art "art", as opposed to simply "this shit that I cobbled together on my computer a few weeks ago."
 

Flashy_McFlash

Well-Known TRIBEr
diablo said:
There is no shame in wanting others to enjoy your artistic endeavours; it's what makes art "art", as opposed to simply "this shit that I cobbled together on my computer a few weeks ago."
Well now we're getting philosophical. I think art is art whether you share it or not. The shit I cobbled together on my computer a few weeks ago is still art whether I perform it/get a book deal/throw it up in a gallery space or not.
 

Lysistrata

Well-Known TRIBEr
but that's a whoel other levels - there are tons of bedroom DJs who make music only for themselves. then there are the pros like AshG, who just above defined success for him as "creating something i, and others, can enjoy." people all over toronto enjoy his music, he's certainly got his following, but he (and others on here!) don't feel the need to bust their balls and compromise the happiness of their lives and the integrity of their art by making it their sole source of income and aiming to play ibiza.

edit: in response to diablo.
 

diablo

TRIBE Member
Lysistrata said:
but he (and others on here!) don't feel the need to bust their balls and compromise the happiness of their lives and the integrity of their art by making it their sole source of income and aiming to play ibiza.

edit: in response to diablo.
I'm not suggesting that at all!

My overarching point in this thread is simply that it is hard to persevere with your passion/craft/art past university age if you're not getting "something back", whether that something is accolades from peers, public recognition, money, or whatever turns your particular crank.

Speaking as a hobby DJ/producer myself, I'd be happy with a much more modest level of success than blowing out a packed house at Amnesia or Creamfields. However, if I constantly played to empty rooms with no positive feedback from people and no money, I would pack it in and find other ways to occupy my time. It doesn't have to be your sole source of income, and you don't have to be world-famous, but the fact that the artist-turned-insurance-salesman and the "1200s for sale" Tribe thread are also known archetypes suggests that no one works at something forever unless they get something out of it, no matter how passionate about it they once were.
 

Spinsah

TRIBE Member
You have to be going out a lot and networking with the right people in addition to keeping up with your sounds. If you have lost the stomach for promotion than you're stuck playing for yourself. And after playing busy dancefloors consistently, going back into the bedroom is tough.
 
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