• Hi Guest: Welcome to TRIBE, the online home of TRIBE MAGAZINE. If you'd like to post here, or reply to existing posts on TRIBE, you first have to register. Join us!

Ephedra Banned by U.S. after 155 deaths

acheron

TRIBE Member
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-ephedra31.html

December 31, 2003

BY LAURAN NEERGAARD

WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration is banning the sale of ephedra early next year, and urged consumers Tuesday to stop using the herbal stimulant that has been linked to 155 deaths and dozens of heart attacks and strokes.

It was the government's first ban on a dietary supplement, one that comes eight years after the Food and Drug Administration began receiving reports that ephedra could be dangerous.

''The time to stop taking these products is now,'' Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson said.

Ephedra once was popular for weight loss and bodybuilding.

But it can cause life-threatening side effects even in seemingly healthy people who use the recommended doses, because the amphetamine-like stimulant speeds the heart rate and constricts blood vessels.

The ban isn't immediate because federal rules require paperwork steps that mean the earliest it could take effect would be March. But the FDA wrote 62 current and former makers and sellers on Tuesday that, ''we intend to shut you down,'' said Commissioner Mark McClellan.

Critics called the ephedra ban long overdue.

Sales already have plummeted because of publicity about the herb's dangers, which peaked after the ephedra-related death of baseball pitcher Steve Bechler.

''It's a dead product, and unfortunately it has become a dead product over the backs of a lot of dead people when the FDA could have acted before,'' said Dr. Sidney Wolfe of the consumer advocacy group Public Citizen.

The FDA said it couldn't act any sooner because of a law that lets dietary supplements sell over the counter without any requirements that they prove to be safe first. To curb sales, FDA must prove a clear danger to public health.
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration is banning the sale of ephedra early next year, and urged consumers Tuesday to stop using the herbal stimulant that has been linked to 155 deaths and dozens of heart attacks and strokes.
Is there any scientific data that actually shows that a moderate dose can lead to death? I have my doubts.
 

R4V4G3D_SKU11S

TRIBE Member
I saw an interview with Tommy Thompson on CNN yesterday.

A woman called in and was saying that ephedrine really works on her asthma. He then told her that ephedrine does nothing for asthma.

Seems like one of "those" government funded studies.
 

echootje

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by acheron
But it can cause life-threatening side effects even in seemingly healthy people who use the recommended doses, because the amphetamine-like stimulant speeds the heart rate and constricts blood vessels.
Does that mean that amphetamines will be banned too and what does this spell for the US military?

Rob
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders

Silvershadow

TRIBE Member
Re: Re: Ephedra Banned by U.S. after 155 deaths

Originally posted by echootje
Does that mean that amphetamines will be banned too and what does this spell for the US military?
No, it says "amphetamine-like stimulant". Actual amphetamines are still safe. :p
 

physix

TRIBE Member
Re: Re: Ephedra Banned by U.S. after 155 deaths

Originally posted by echootje
Does that mean that amphetamines will be banned too and what does this spell for the US military?

Rob

i'm sure the military has moved on from ephedra and
that's why the US suddenly wants to ban it..


i'm sure there's something else that they use,
now... maybe adirol or something...
 

silver1

TRIBE Member
There was a pretty prominent case in the US last year of a death linked to Ephedra when that pitcher from the Orioles died in spring training. He was supposedly taking crazy amounts of it every day though.
 

thom100

TRIBE Member
I just find it funny, that smoking kills aprox. 155 people every 12 hours in the US and they still have not banned that.
 

man_slut

TRIBE Member
Re: Re: Ephedra Banned by U.S. after 155 deaths

Originally posted by Subsonic Chronic
Is there any scientific data that actually shows that a moderate dose can lead to death? I have my doubts.
Your doubts are correct. When my company analyzed all the reports (in Canada and the U.S.) it was due to contadictions with other drugs, over dosing or people with serious conditions that shouldn't even be taking aspirin.
 
tribe magazine legacy photo exhibit

Chicago Kid

TRIBE Member
I dunno, I used to take Xenadrine with Ephedra towards my final 2 years of college soccer in Chicago and I never had any problems with it...well, apart from not really sleeping properly, shaking and being off my nut for most of the day. And I was taking the recommended dosage, but also training like crazy. It's a fine line in my opinion. Just like a lot of other things, if you abuse it...it'll abuse you.

CK
 

the_fornicator

TRIBE Member
Re: Re: Ephedra Banned by U.S. after 155 deaths

Originally posted by Subsonic Chronic
Is there any scientific data that actually shows that a moderate dose can lead to death? I have my doubts.
also agreed... i'd also like to know out the 155 people who's death is linked to ephedra, how many were:

a) overweight?
b) not drinking enough fluids (body probably dehydrated)?
c) in a really hot environment?
d) all of the above?
 

graham

Well-Known TRIBEr
Originally posted by the_fornicator
kind of funny cause the government still hasn't banned fucking alcohol.

how many deaths has that drug caused?
not as many as I would cause if they banned it
 
tribe magazine legacy photo exhibit

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
Originally posted by tayo
DID YOU KNOW..
The U.S. airforce doesn't allow pilots to use aspartame
(nutrasweet)
:eek:
But they give their pilots "go pills" which are dexedrine and benzedrine.

Flying on 'go pills'

BY TARA COPP and SIDNEY SCHUHMANN
Scripps Howard News Service October 28, 2002

The Air Force calls them a "fatigue management tool." Pilots call them "go pills."

Clinically, the drug is known as dextroamphetamine, commercially sold as Dexedrine. Closely related to the highly dangerous street drug methamphetamine, it stimulates the nervous system to combat fatigue. B-1 pilots like Col. Robert Gass take the pills to help stay alert on long missions. This spring, Gass took off from Dyess Air Force Base for a 20-hour mission overseas to assist in Operation Enduring Freedom. Midway through the flight, Gass said he took a pill so he would be more alert during a complicated refueling. "During mission planning, we plan when to take these pills, and it's based on what we are doing at that time," Gass said. "When we are really just cruising at a high altitude, and the demands on our attention and aviation skills are lowest, we plan not to take it. We plan to take it just before those cockpit demands rise. So I took this about 30 minutes before the refueling operation."

The result, he said, "was a short-term boost."

"What I noticed was a heightened state of alertness," Gass said. "It was similar to drinking a couple of strong cups of coffee."

The military has been looking into ways to increase the alertness of its war fighters, something it sees as key to maintaining an advantage.

"As combat systems become more and more sophisticated and reliable, the major limiting factor for operational dominance in a conflict is the warfighter," according to a 2001 report by the Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. "In short, the capability to operate effectively, without sleep, is no less than a 21st century revolution in military affairs that results in operational dominance."

Gass has flown for 18 years, and the spring mission was his first time to perform a long flight with dextroamphetamine assistance.

"I think they (the pills) are a valuable tool, so I would expect their use to become more mainstream," Gass said. "And the more we use it, the more intelligently we will be able to use it as well."

But the use of dextroamphetamines remains controversial, mostly for the pills' stated side-effects: dizziness, blurred vision, potential to become habit-forming and concealing symptoms of extreme fatigue, according to the medical site WebMD, which also warns that users of the pill should "use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities."

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency lists Dexedrine as a "schedule 2" drug, putting it under the highest level of control for a legitimate pharmaceutical, said Rogene Waite, a spokeswoman for the agency. Schedule 1 drugs are completely illegal, like heroin and marijuana. Other schedule 2 drugs include morphine and methadone.

The drug can be habit forming, too, something that worries John Pike, a defense analyst with GlobalSecurity.org, a national defense research firm in Washington.

"Dexedrine is a controlled substance. There is a reason that Starbucks doesn't sell it," said Pike. "One reason Starbucks doesn't sell it is that it's habit-forming and has a much greater potential for abuse."

Military doctors may recommend Dexedrine for flights that are 10 hours long or more, that are flown at night or that have time changes. The wing commander approves the pills and Air Combat Command is notified.

The pills are prescribed per mission.

A normal does is 10 milligrams - a small dose, according to Lt. Saje Park.

Before they get a prescription for the pills, pilots are given a dosage as a test and evaluated. Only fighter and bomber pilots can take the pills.

Gass said he didn't notice side effects. He said the pill kept him alert for about two hours and then wore off.

"It was taken in the context of a very long mission," Gass said. "I couldn't really say, if we'd landed immediately thereafter, if there'd been any noticeable effects. The effects, in any case were not extreme. We still had about 10 hours to fly, so I had no problem going to sleep when I made it to our forward operating location. "
 

Caz

TRIBE Member
crazy! I was just in South Florida, and it's on the counter at every convenience store. and i dont mean on the shelf, i mean right at the register like those little bottles of ginseng, and in these bright yellow bottles with a red lightning bolt going through the name

too funny

then again, it only takes four hours and $15 to get your concealed weapons licence in the state of Florida:confused:
 

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
here is another.. the last line is a killer

Monday, March 17, 2003

'Go pills' for pilots given with caution
Stimulants suspected in bombing error that killed 4 in 2002

By M.L. LYKE
SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER

ABOARD THE USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN IN THE PERSIAN GULF -- "Go pills" have been a thorny issue with the military since two Air Force pilots accidentally dropped a 500-pound bomb on Canadian infantry in Afghanistan last year, killing four and wounding eight.

The pilots' defense lawyers argued that the stimulant pills they took were to blame.

"Our intent is to not have anything even remotely similar happen," said Lt. Alan McInnis, the USS Abraham Lincoln's flight surgeon.

Aboard the Lincoln, the 79 fighter pilots carrying out missions over southern Iraq can choose to carry a small dose of Dexedrine on flights, to ward off fatigue during seven- to nine-hour flights.

But those doses are locked up in the pharmacy and carefully controlled, said McInnis, 34.

"They're used only in extreme cases, for very long missions. The whole purpose is to get the pilot back aboard safely, not, as has been suggested, to extend the mission, or the number of flights a pilot can do on any given day."

McInnis said that doses are small, equivalent to a cup or two of coffee. "It's not even enough to get a buzz."

Pilots, who work irregular hours day and night, have to ask for the Dexedrine pills, and he screens the men individually to test their reactions. "I make sure they don't have an odd reaction," he said.

Some pilots aboard refuse to take them. They say, 'I know how dangerous these missions are, and that's enough to keep me awake.' "

McInnis oversees any medication given pilots -- down to vitamins, even a single Motrin.

"The pilots, they're like athletes," he says. "We want them to be on top of their game."
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders
tribe cannabis goldsmith - gold cannabis accessories
Top