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Cuba?

expat

TRIBE Member
Has anyone been to Cuba? Any recommendations for places to stay in or around Havana? I'd like a package deal (flight/accomadation) for the Havana area, but I'm open to suggestions.
Any help will be appreciated!
 

Dr. Grinch

TRIBE Member
Varadero and then travel in to Havana

And pick up the book "The Rough Guide to Cuba"
Wicked information and maps and stuff in it
 

expat

TRIBE Member
I'm thinking of avoiding Varadero, because I heard it's just beaches (albeit beautiful beaches). I'm thinking Havana and Pinar Del Rio. Thoughts?
 

bitchass

TRIBE Member
my parents did a weeklong trip to cuba in september and stayed the first 3 days in havanna then the next 3 at a resort in varadero. the package the had included all hotel and transportation (took a 2 hour cabride from hotel national in havana to the resort in veradero and the resort just pays the cab fare)

they really enjoyed their trip and aren't really the 'typical tourists' as they grew up in belize and really like to see the not-as-advertised stuff. that said, they really enjoyed a tour of the deep caves that double as a nightclub of some sort at night.
 
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Dr. Grinch

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by SelfExel
Go to the ghettos, see the real cuba. It might change the rest of your life.
I stayed in Cayo Coco, which is just a tourist paradise.
But me and my bro rented a car and drove to Santa Clara and Moron. It was fucking amazing. The cities are incredible, but as far as STAYING somewhere, resorts are where it's at. Unless you're REALLY fluent in Spanish, and have been there before, you'll get screwed trying to stay in the cities. Especially Havana.

Go to Santa Clara and see the Che memorial. One of the most incredible things I've ever seen in my life. Brought tears to my eyes.
 

stir-fry

TRIBE Member
make sure your hotel doesn't have a saltwater pool..

ours did.. no one was in the pool, i jumped in the minute we got to the hotel.. and man did i recieve a shock! i had my mouth opened and everything
 

SelfExel

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Dr. Grinch

Go to Santa Clara and see the Che memorial. One of the most incredible things I've ever seen in my life. Brought tears to my eyes.
Why did it bring you to tears?
 
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SelfExel

TRIBE Member
I don't know to much about the man. I read some stuff but I don't think I connected with the ideology. Do you mind giving me a brief description? Of his purpose, like what he most stood for, in your eyes.
 

litespeed

Well-Known TRIBEr
choose the date when you want to go... then wait untill a week before and buy a sell off.
you can ALWAYS get sell offs and you save oodles of dough.
 

Dr. Grinch

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by SelfExel
I don't know to much about the man. I read some stuff but I don't think I connected with the ideology. Do you mind giving me a brief description? Of his purpose, like what he most stood for, in your eyes.
My idealogy (surely to be debated and torn down by others on here) is that he was a hero who was brutally killed by American trained Guerillas. He fought for his beliefs, and helped lead a revolution that freed his country from an opressive government.

His autobiography is incredible. The CIA hunted him and his men for weeks through the cliffs and caves. An agent found him alive, but starving and weak in a cave, and his mission was to kill him. That agent asked him if he had any last words, and he spoke to him. What he said (the agent never revealed exactly what it was) was so impassioned and moving that the agent actually handed him his pistol, and told him that he wished him success in his fight.

That's pretty fucking powerful.

A lot of people probably think it's communist pinko shit or something, but I think making the kind of difference he did and dying for your cause makes someone a real hero.

$.02
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
I stayed in Havana for two weeks and Veradero for one night (New Years) last year.

In Veradero you will look at a bunch of fat Canadians on the beach, and in Havana you will see life. However, you may also undergo a bit of culture shock.


cuba colour

cuba black and white

(wait for it to load and adjust your browser size accordingly)
 
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expat

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Boss Hog

In Veradero you will look at a bunch of fat Canadians on the beach, and in Havana you will see life.
That's what I was told, which is why I'd like to avoid Veradero.
Where did you stay in Havana?
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by beatnik
That's what I was told, which is why I'd like to avoid Veradero.
Where did you stay in Havana?
I got into a cab at the airport and said "Centro Habana" with no clue as to what I was going to do. He couldn't speak english, but figured out within about 5 minutes that I had no place to stay. So he took me into this sketchy apartment building with grates on every door and went door to door talking to some people.

They called around and within half an hour I was bartering for an apartment in this building, which was owned by a 40ish couple with no kids. The deal was I would pay them cash for two weeks accommodation while they left their apartment and went who knows where. The money they were asking was more than enough to put themselves up somewhere with a chunk of change left over, I'm sure.

So I lived in their apartment with a 270 degree view of Havana for that time. I might have the info somewhere around still.
 

madnezz

TRIBE Member
I was in Cuba just a few weeks ago for 7 nights, and it was awesome. We stayed at one of the best resorts on the strip in Veradero- called BEACHES (5 star). Good good, nice rooms, nice beach.

We spent a couple days in Havana, and I have a couple business cards for some interesting hotels in the core. Next time, I will stay in Havana, but it was nice to have a resort to come back to the first time. There's also lots to see just 20 minutes from the hotel when you rent mopeds, so you're not totally isolated from what's going on.

Havana is incredible though. PM me if you want any more info.

Boss Hog- I went to that cemetary too!!! it's incredible. Nice pics!!!
 
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MoFo

TRIBE Member
Not to be a party poop but every time I hear people talk about going to resorts, it's in my conscience to have to post this.

Paraphrased from what I've read, studied and watched throughout the years:

On colonialism: it is necessary to know how tourism has developed. The suffering produced by the tourist industry began with the emergence of the "haole", or white settler. The first explorer to discover and colonize Hawai'i was Captain James Cook in 1778. With him he brought capitalism, modern political ideas, Christianity, and the most devastating of all, diseases.


On exoticism: the greatest historical factor influencing the tourist industry's development is the European invented "myth of paradise." The myth originates from explorers' visits to Tahiti. In 1768 Louis Antoine de Bougainville described Tahiti as, "I thought I was transported into the garden of Eden" (Hall and Page 19).

On tourism today: "Tourism is a form of 'leisure imperialism' and represents the 'hedonistic face of neocolonialism" This is apparent through the Hawai'i Visitors Bureau. This exclusive, elitist organization controls the promotion, factual information, visitor reactions, research of the tourist industry, and ultimately tourists' discourse. It is supported by state funds and paying members of hotels, restaurants, newspapers, U-drive agencies, trade unions, retailers, and clothing manufacturers.

Kay Trask (Maui activist, professor and author) affirms that "The state of Hawai'i pours millions of dollars into the tourism industry, even to the extent of funding a "booster club" (the Hawai'i Visitors Bureau) whose television and radio propaganda tells locals 'the more you give' to tourism 'the more you get’" The industry and state government relies heavily on the Bureau's research. Thus, the powerful serve the powerful by regulating tourism and its discourse. Therefore, imperialism continues in the form tourism. Native Hawaiians, such as Haunani-Kay Trask, have little power over tourism in their own homeland.

While tourism is portrayed as an economic savior by providing thousands of jobs, the charts do not indicate the uneven distribution of wealth produced by the tourist industry. Tourism is a "labor intensive" industry that relies on low wages by considering the work "unskilled" or "natural".

Trask points out that while profits boast millions ofdollars, natives who work in the tourist industry as dancers, waiters, singers, valets, gardeners, housekeepers, bartenders, and even some managers earn only 10,000 to 25,000 dollars a year. This is an impossible salary for families. In fact, Hawai’i has the worst ratio of average family income to average family costs. Fifty-two percent of families' gross income is spent on housing.

From the early nineteen seventies to the early nineteen eighties, Hawai’i's residents' income increased only one percent while the tourist industry was booming. Forced off their land and given poorly paid jobs, native Hawaiians have been crowded into urban areas and rural slums. About one-fifth of Hawai’i's residents live in poverty and over 29, 000 families are on Hawaiian trust lands list, waiting for housing, pastoral, or agricultural lots. For instance, in the 1970s Sand Island Beach village was home to about 138 families, mostly native Hawaiians. Already forced off their land due to tourist developments, these families lived in lumber and cardboard constructed houses. In 1980 arrests were made when the entire village was evicted and made into a park. Extravagant living costs have made renting or buying housing impossible.




Apologies again but I had to. You'll never catch me at a resort.



Just something to think about when you're sipping on all-you-can-drink cocktails and asking the server for towels. Ever. If I'm going to go to a place, I'll stay in a hotel, backpack and really get to know the place. Or at least, have a native guide with me who knows what's going on. But I'm not interested in Cuba, the Dominican or Maui anyway.

Go to these places, I'm sure they're fun and the deals ARE good. But be aware of what you're supporting as well and the effects of your decisions.

I'd expect the same kind of information from others about what I do. So someone please attack my fashion threads. :)
 

MoFo

TRIBE Member
Ha. Correcto mundo. I'm really into Kay Trask's activism throughout the years and I made a promise to myself last year that I would never set foot in a resort. It's the least I could do, really.
I can't help it. It's got to do with my own opinions on colonialism, racial equality and turbo-capitalism.

I'm all for every-man-for-himself sometimes but sometimes, we have to draw the line on when it's too much.

People can do what they want. But I don't see any harm in me shedding some light on some stuff. They can take it for what it is. Hell, maybe someone might even decide never to support these types of industries like I did.
Hell, one (or 20) less towel or drink for a server to deal with.
 
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