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CRTC and usage-based billing: The internet is now officially dead

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
96% of internet users are subject to caps
the 4% who aren't started letter writing and petition signing campaign.

the government is now bowing to the pressure of a tiny minority so they can feed their appetite for illegal torrents.

and now everyone is all yay! foreign ownership!!

It's blowback from years of living under the thumb of a crappy telecom monopoly. the public is looking for a way out - any way out.
 
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workdowntown

TRIBE Member
Here's the boilerplate from the Liberals to everyone who signed the petition and emailed MPs.

WDT --

It’s another step towards an open and competitive internet in Canada, and it's thanks to you.

Late last night, news broke that Tony Clement will ask the Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to reverse their decision on usage-based internet billing – a decision that allows internet service providers to impose download limits and new fees.

Our work is not yet done. We need to keep up the pressure until the CRTC’s decision is reversed once and for all.

Canadian families and businesses need open, affordable, unlimited internet access. The future of our economy depends on it. The Conservative government should have known that from the start.

When messages like yours reached us this past weekend – on Twitter and Facebook, by email, phone and fax – my Liberal colleagues and I knew what we had to do.

On Tuesday morning, we sided with you against the CRTC’s decision. By the end of the day, Liberal MPs on the Industry Committee had already begun an investigation. Then, yesterday, we kept the pressure on the Conservative government during Question Period in the House of Commons. At tonight’s meeting of the Industry Committee, Liberal MPs will tell CRTC Chair Konrad von Finckenstein to reverse course.

This isn't the first time that you’ve stared down the Conservatives over an open internet — and that's why tens of thousands of you visited our action page at Take action: join Liberal opposition to the usage-based billing decision, to join our digital policy email list and help carry the fight into Parliament.

This is your movement. You rallied on Twitter. You wrote emails and called Tony Clement’s office. You made the difference.

We all know that there are wider issues at stake here. After five years of Stephen Harper, Canada still has no digital plan. The Conservatives’ proposed copyright bill contains unfair digital lock provisions. Canadians are less connected and face higher internet costs than citizens of other OECD countries. And don’t even get me started on the long-form census.

Liberals have been engaged on these issues. In 2009, we worked with the Openmedia.ca / Save Our Net Coalition on Net Neutrality, a position that we support wholeheartedly. Last fall, we announced our Open Government Initiative, which will make government data accessible to all Canadians.

At the heart of our digital policy is a core Liberal value: we must make Canada more competitive and more innovative. That means expanding high-speed internet access to every region of the country, fair and equitable wholesale access, and transparent pricing.

We must build a digital strategy for Canada that embraces the energy, entrepreneurial spirit, and innovative creativity of consumers, businesses and digital influencers like you.

We'll keep the pressure on the Conservatives in Parliament to make sure they follow through and reverse the CRTC’s decision on usage-based billing. This victory is just a taste of what we can accomplish, if we continue this fight together.

I hope you’ll join the Liberal Party's digital policy email list at Take action: join Liberal opposition to the usage-based billing decision. Let’s build a more open, more competitive future for Canada.

Thank you for being engaged.

Michael Ignatieff



Original Message ----------------
Subject: Stop Usage-Based Billing
From: WDT

I call on Canadian decision makers to stop big telecom companies from forcing usage-based Internet billing on Canadians. Please stand up for consumer choice and competition in the Internet service market. I want affordable access to the Internet.

WDT
 

octo

TRIBE Member
regarding alex's post ^^i realise that. i just think it's interesting that such a huge deal was made about something that affected such a small percentage of the population, most of whom are probably using the unlimitted bandwith for illegal downloads.

but i guess the rest of the public is behind it because this is the straw that broke the camel's back. i just hope the root structural and policy related problems are eventually addressed.
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
octo, your trolling is getting kind of boring and you haven't added anything new to the discussion in several pages. I don't know if you've noticed, but you just keep repeating the same thing over and over.
 
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octo

TRIBE Member
ya it's an assumption

you're right subsonic i have been a troll. i'll stop now.

you guys carry on debating teksavvy vs rogers vs bell customer service.
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
96% of internet users are subject to caps
the 4% who aren't started letter writing and petition signing campaign.

the government is now bowing to the pressure of a tiny minority so they can feed their appetite for illegal torrents.

and now everyone is all yay! foreign ownership!!

Ya I heard that stat too - but they're not accurate to say that "96% are capped" - what they mean is 96% are on big service providers that cap all NEW customers - but ignores the population, like myself, that are with a big provider but on an old package that is still uncapped. I am unsure what this % is.

There was a previous CRTC decision last year wherein these companies won the right to move these customers to capped packages, but as of yet, has not happened with me.
 

SlipperyPete

TRIBE Member
It also ignores the reality that usage across the board will increase as more and more users get more and more of their content online. It's not about torrents, it's about access to information, both now and in the future.
 

Lojack

TRIBE Member
It also ignores the reality that usage across the board will increase as more and more users get more and more of their content online. It's not about torrents, it's about access to information, both now and in the future.

*EXACTLY*

I work in the ISP industry, and I have heard many high-level conversations between executives trying to figure out how to increase profits from their customer bases as Internet content increases.

In many ways we're back to the mid-late 90's when dial-up limits were in place. Eventually that model collapsed, and for good reason.

-- L.
 
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workdowntown

TRIBE Member
Openmedia are asking for public input directed to the CRTC for the re-examination of metered billing.

Dear CRTC, I Want YOU to Stop The Meter | OpenMedia.ca

The CRTC just announced they will reexamine metered billing practices. They are seeking public input right now! This is a huge opportunity to stop Internet metering, and to ensure Canadians have access to an unlimited Internet.

Please take a moment to send the CRTC a message here: Dear CRTC, I Want YOU to Stop The Meter | OpenMedia.ca

OpenMedia.ca asked Canadians to send Ottawa a message about Internet metering, and wow did you ever respond – over 420,000 signed the petition!

The CRTC's move to review the imposition of billing practices through a public process is in direct response to our petition - they even cited the "public outcry".

At the same time, we all know a Big Telecom-friendly compromise is being pushed behind closed doors. To avoid another industry crafted solution we urgently need to send a message to the CRTC HERE.

We must sway the CRTC now to make our previous victories stick. If we don't convince the CRTC, all could be lost - all Internet users could face a metered Internet and pay up $4 per gigabyte!

We’ve already moved politics in Canada and made it easy for politicians to champion the Internet. Let’s force the CRTC to do the same.

Dear CRTC, I Want YOU to Stop The Meter | OpenMedia.ca

We’ve come this far, let’s not stop now,

~ The OpenMedia.ca team

Support this campaign by making a small donation to our Stop the Meter Fund at: Save The Affordable Internet! | OpenMedia.ca (this donation will cost you a lot less than UBB)

SOURCES:

Strombo Talks Internet Metering

Strombo Talks Internet Metering | OpenMedia.ca

Vancouver Sun - How B.C. activists fought off the Internet billing plan

How B.C. activists fought off the Internet billing plan

Georgia Straight - Geek Speak: Lindsey Pinto, OpenMedia.ca

Geek Speak: Lindsey Pinto, OpenMedia.ca | Vancouver, Canada | Straight.com

Globe And Mail - A metered Internet is a regulatory failure

A metered Internet is a regulatory failure - The Globe and Mail

Canadians Just Became World's Biggest Internet Losers

The Tyee – Canadians Just Became World's Biggest Internet Losers

TorrentFreak - Massive Protest Against Canadian Bandwidth Caps

http://torrentfreak.com/canadian-bandwidth-caps-110131/

CBC Visits OpenMedia.ca

YouTube - CBC Visits OpenMedia.ca
 

Spinsah

TRIBE Member
From Teksvavvy

Dear TekSavvy Customer,

Because of your support and participation in reaching out to the
various MPs and the Minister of Industry we're pleased to announce
that the March 1st UBB implementation date has been suspended indefinitely.

With over 460,000 signatures having been sent to Parliament Minister
Clement and the Industry committee requested the CRTC review its
recent decision in full, which it has obliged and are now doing.
Until this review has occurred UBB over DSL has been completely
shelved. Minister Clement also added they would overturn the review
should it resemble in any way to the previous outcome!

So, congratulations to all who've spoken up about this issue, you've
made a huge difference. As a Canadian, today, I can honestly say it's
refreshing to know politicians do listen and will affect change when
the public at large shows concern!

Effective March 1st we are going to move forward and make changes to
the Usage, but we're going to make it a positive one!

We are reinstating the Unlimited package but the 200GB package will be
changed... to 300GB! UBB is about Internet Costs, and as a result of
lower costs with our providers (Peer1, Lime Light, etc...), costs
outside our relationship with companies like Bell, we are extending
the savings on to you, the clients... Enjoy!

PS - To view your usage or receive more details on reinstated/upgraded
packages go to http://myworld.teksavvy.com. Please note that usage on
the Customer Portal is currently only available to DSL users. We are
working towards adding this option to all of our Cable users.
 
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SmoothOperator

TRIBE Member
I have Cable internet with Teksavvy. On the 200gb plan, but was told from the get-go that I would never be charged for overages. So essentially, it's unlimited.

Just throwing this out there as some of you may be springing for the actual "unlimited" plan and wasting your dollars.
 
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randyval

TRIBE Member
it had its ups and downs, thrills and chills, moments of treacherousness, a climax, and a nice happy ending :)


all in all a very good thread.
 

acheron

TRIBE Member
not so dead actually.. UBB is dead in fact!

Independent ISPs to have flexibility to offer competitive retail services without capping bandwidth
OTTAWA-GATINEAU, November 15, 2011 — Today, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) introduced a new way for large telephone and cable companies to charge independent Internet service providers (ISPs) for the use of their networks. This wholesale billing model, which is based on capacity, will give independent ISPs added flexibility in offering competitive and innovative services to Canadians.
The CRTC does not regulate rates or set bandwidth caps for retail Internet customers. To encourage greater competition, the CRTC requires that large telephone and cable companies sell access to their networks to independent ISPs, under specific terms and conditions. Canadians can then choose between multiple ISPs.
Under the CRTC’s new capacity-based approach, large telephone and cable companies will sell wholesale bandwidth to independent ISPs on a monthly basis. Independent ISPs will have to determine in advance the amount they need to serve their retail customers and then manage network capacity until they are able to purchase more. Alternatively, large companies can continue to charge independent ISPs a flat monthly fee for wholesale access, regardless of how much bandwidth their customers use. Both billing options give independent ISPs the ability to design service plans and charge their own customers as they see fit.
“Our aim is to foster a marketplace in which Canadians have as many options as possible for their Internet services,” said Konrad von Finckenstein, Q.C., Chairman of the CRTC. “Independent ISPs provide an alternative to the large telephone and cable companies, but must rely on these same companies for certain elements of their network. Under the capacity-based model announced today, they will have to forecast their usage and plan accordingly.”
The same requirements will now apply to all large telephone and cable companies, ensuring that independent ISPs can choose between different wholesale providers under similar terms.
The rates approved by the CRTC will allow the large companies to recover their costs and provide them with incentives to continue investing in their networks to meet future increases in Internet traffic.
In addition, the CRTC approved a flat-rate only model for wholesale business services.
CRTC supports choice of Internet services

Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2011-703
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-704.htm
 

acheron

TRIBE Member
not so dead actually.. UBB is dead in fact!

Independent ISPs to have flexibility to offer competitive retail services without capping bandwidth
OTTAWA-GATINEAU, November 15, 2011 — Today, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) introduced a new way for large telephone and cable companies to charge independent Internet service providers (ISPs) for the use of their networks. This wholesale billing model, which is based on capacity, will give independent ISPs added flexibility in offering competitive and innovative services to Canadians.
The CRTC does not regulate rates or set bandwidth caps for retail Internet customers. To encourage greater competition, the CRTC requires that large telephone and cable companies sell access to their networks to independent ISPs, under specific terms and conditions. Canadians can then choose between multiple ISPs.
Under the CRTC’s new capacity-based approach, large telephone and cable companies will sell wholesale bandwidth to independent ISPs on a monthly basis. Independent ISPs will have to determine in advance the amount they need to serve their retail customers and then manage network capacity until they are able to purchase more. Alternatively, large companies can continue to charge independent ISPs a flat monthly fee for wholesale access, regardless of how much bandwidth their customers use. Both billing options give independent ISPs the ability to design service plans and charge their own customers as they see fit.
“Our aim is to foster a marketplace in which Canadians have as many options as possible for their Internet services,” said Konrad von Finckenstein, Q.C., Chairman of the CRTC. “Independent ISPs provide an alternative to the large telephone and cable companies, but must rely on these same companies for certain elements of their network. Under the capacity-based model announced today, they will have to forecast their usage and plan accordingly.”
The same requirements will now apply to all large telephone and cable companies, ensuring that independent ISPs can choose between different wholesale providers under similar terms.
The rates approved by the CRTC will allow the large companies to recover their costs and provide them with incentives to continue investing in their networks to meet future increases in Internet traffic.
In addition, the CRTC approved a flat-rate only model for wholesale business services.
CRTC supports choice of Internet services

http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2011/2011-703.htm
Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2011-704
 
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