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Crazy Hugo: Halloween = Gringo Terrorism

Hal-9000

TRIBE Member
lol this guy's pure awesome for zany statements.

Chavez warns of spooky US Halloween 'terrorism'
Oct 31 7:51 PM US/Eastern


President Hugo Chavez cautioned Venezuelan parents to protect their children from Halloween with a spooky warning that the US tradition is rooted in "terrorism."

"What they have implanted here, which is really a 'gringo' custom, is terrorism," Chavez said, quoted in the local press. "They disguise children as witches and wizards, that is contrary to our culture."



Chavez often lashes out at the US government, which he has described as "terrorist" and accused of plotting his assassination. But this time his warnings were directed at the American celebration that combines costumes and candy.

He issued "an appeal for reflection by parents" not to encourage their children to dress up for the holiday.

His comments came after authorities in Caracas recently seized pumpkins, cardboard skeleton costumes and other traditional Halloween items inscribed with anti-Chavez messages.

US families were celebrating Halloween, during which disguised children go door to door saying "trick or treat," on Monday.
 

2canplay

TRIBE Member
Well, when you consider that global chocolate supplies are controlled by 3 western companies; that Halloween is perpetuated by retailers and manufacturers to boost sales and profits and that in North America we are battling rampant child obesiety, induced by "manufactured" holidays, habits and customs...I think he's on to something.
 
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Gunark

TRIBE Member
On one hand it's kind of sad to see Chavez slide towards insanity, on the other, you have to take these reports about Crazy Hugo with a grain of salt. The guy says nutty things, but you have to keep in mind the socio-political climate in Venezuela. The poor and uneducated eat this shit up, and Chavez needs to keep the poor and uneducated mobilized to stay in power.

Also, he does spend a whole lot of time speaking (hours and hours, on an almost daily basis), and he does need to fill up all that time somehow. Once in a while something truly dumb will slip out... I just wish the western/northern media would at least occassionally report some of the other 99% of what he says, which is often correct and insightful.

In any case though, I wish Chavez had looked more to Brazil and less to Cuba. Hopefully this will still somehow work out, but yeah, from our point of view in the long term things are looking bleaker and bleaker for Venezuela.
 
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~atp~

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Gunark
On one hand it's kind of sad to see Chavez slide towards insanity, on the other, you have to take these reports about Crazy Hugo with a grain of salt. The guy says nutty things, but you have to keep in mind the socio-political climate in Venezuela. The poor and uneducated eat this shit up, and Chavez needs to keep the poor and uneducated mobilized to stay in power.
This is precisely what I mentioned in the 357th thread about Venezuela.

There is an ideological conflict that he faces: on one hand, he can appeal to his support base and feed them rhetoric that isolates him from the North American diplomats and some of his support base here, yet strengthens his support internally. Yet, rhetoric and propaganda is precisely what generates a disillusioned public and is usually a harbinger of great disappointment. I think that his approach is simplistic and misguided. He can maintain appeal without using the language of propaganda by helping the public to think for themselves and reminding them that propaganda is itself an evil sold out by the Americans.


Also, he does spend a whole lot of time speaking (hours and hours, on an almost daily basis), and he does need to fill up all that time somehow. Once in a while something truly dumb will slip out... I just wish the western/northern media would at least occassionally report some of the other 99% of what he says, which is often correct and insightful.
This is true...I think there are transcripts of these...I'll hunt...
 

Gunark

TRIBE Member
While we're doing the Venezuela thing for the 357th time, I'll mention that a few months back there was a really great piece in The Nation (leftist pinko crazies :)) about Venezuela. The tone of the article was pretty resigned and unoptimistic, which leads me to believe that there really is something very wrong in Caracas. The editorial staff at The Nation wouldn't print this unless there really wasn't anything more positive to say about the revolución.

Here's the article: http://www.thenation.com/doc/20050411/parenti

Basically the gist of it is this: Corruption, as expected, is a huge problem, and the windfall from sky high oil prices is making it much, much worse.
 

judge wopner

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Gunark


Basically the gist of it is this: Corruption, as expected, is a huge problem, and the windfall from sky high oil prices is making it much, much worse.
corruption in latin america gets taken to poetic levels. right wing/left wing makes no difference historically.

many states that have found themselves rich with natural resources have to carefully manage said funds they will be awash in, Canada, Norway and for Africa: Tanzania have good track records of taking profits while giving back to the populace and building infastructure as opposed to South Africa, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Iran and Mexico (back in the silver days) that saw billions go into the hands of a few moguls and virutally nothing to the nations well being.

i feel like venezuela in on that brink right now, especially if oil prices continue to skyrocket next summer, and i cant think of a better latin american leader than a Chavez to do it. fingers crossed... (hoping to go there next year and mabey get a chance to see chavez speak in public!!)
 
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Gizmo

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by judge wopner
Africa: Tanzania have good track records of taking profits while giving back to the populace and building infastructure


They sold their nickel reserves for cheap to a South African company (Rangold).

Uranium Resources PLC out of Britain own the rights to their richest uranium prospecting sites for 350,000 pounds sterling. Hardly earth shattering stuff.

It's one of the poorest countries in Africa...unofficial AIDS rate is around 20%...(unrelated, the director of a relief organization we sponsor two villages through from work there, was noting how she had to replace about 40%f of her workforce cos of aid's related illnesses or they drop out of the workforce due to the stigma..) Literacry rates are still really low.

Although the current Prime Minister is somewhat well regarded, he has a shitload of work to do before he can erase the decades of corruption.

Just wondering what benchmark you're using to make this claim about Tanzania...having good infrastructure....especially when you compare it other african nations like Ghana, Libya, Gabon and Botswana.
 

OTIS

TRIBE Member
Yeah, sounds pretty odd, although anti-halloween sentiment is certainly not confined to Venezuela. Many european countries complain about it the same way every year. Not that it's some state sponsored terrorist plot, but that it has no cultural connection to them and in some cases undermines other cultural celebrations/holidays that fall on the same day.

In other news... looks like Bush and Chavez are going to meet this week.

SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS
Demonstrators await Bush in Argentina
President's talks with Venezuela's Chavez are likely to be strained

By JULIE MASON and JOHN OTIS
Copyright 2005 Houston Chronicle

WASHINGTON - President Bush heads to South America on Thursday at a time when Washington's long-sought free-trade plan with the region has gone cold, anti-American sentiment has heated to a steady boil and massive street protests seem likely.

The trip, which ends on Monday, is geared toward the economy and trade, and will take the president and first lady Laura Bush to the Summit of the Americas at Mar del Plata, Argentina, and then on to stops in Brazil and Panama.

Not only are negotiations for the so-called Free Trade Area of the Americas stalled, but Bush is also hobbled by tricky relationships with several South American leaders he will meet at the summit, notably Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, a leftist who calls Bush ''Mr. Danger."

"The fly in the ointment is going to be Chavez," said Stephen Johnson, a former State Department official and senior analyst at the Heritage Foundation.

The Venezuelan, who will meet with Bush at the summit, "is going to try to elicit attention away from Bush to try to enhance his own image," Johnson said.

Bush is not a popular figure on Latin American streets, said Larry Birns of the Council on Hemispheric Affairs in Washington. "People don't identify with him. They identify with Chavez."

Ex-soccer star to protest
Outside the meeting rooms, the most dramatic action at the summit promises to be in the streets, where former Argentine soccer star Diego Maradona will lead what are expected to be sizable protests against Bush.

Thousands of demonstrators have already massed in Mar del Plata for a "People's Summit," the Associated Press reported.

"I think (Bush) probably needs to get in and get out," said Julia Sweig of the private Council on Foreign Relations, "and maybe the more interesting things are going to be happening on the streets, rather than in the room."

Bush is not fond of summits and is not expected to emerge from this year's meeting with much substance to show for it.

Birns said the trip was expected to provide a respite for Bush from one of the most challenging periods of his presidency, which has included polls showing a decline in support because of concerns over the Iraq war, an indictment of a top aide to Vice President Dick Cheney and the withdrawal of one Supreme Court nominee and the naming of another.

"Flying the flag abroad doesn't necessarily hurt an embattled president with lots of domestic issues," Birns said.

The summit is the fourth in a series of regionwide meetings. At the first Summit of the Americas, held in 1994 at Miami during the Clinton administration, peace treaties that ended several civil wars and a push for a hemisphere-wide free-trade agreement seemed to promise a new era of prosperity for Latin America and closer cooperation with Washington.

But 11 years later, experts say, 43 percent of Latin Americans remain in poverty, regional trade talks have stalled, and the Bush administration — preoccupied by Iraq and the war on terror — has ignored nations south of the border.

"Relations between the U.S. and Latin America are probably as bad as they've been at any time since the end of the Cold War," said Peter Hakim, president of the Inter-American Dialogue, a Washington think tank.

The Bush administration also has lost influence among many Latin Americans who believe that Washington tacitly backed a 2002 coup that briefly ousted Chavez and did little to help Argentina during that nation's economic meltdown in 2001.

"Those two events really undermined Washington's capacity to be seen as an important leader," Sweig said.

Instead, a new generation of leftist politicians is winning power and influence.

In addition to Venezuela, left-leaning chief executives have been elected in eight other countries in the region, including Argentina, Brazil and Chile. Polls suggest that leftists may win Bolivia's election later this year and Mexico's presidential election next year.

Many Latin American leaders take a dim view of the war in Iraq and Washington's preoccupation with Islamic terrorism. Yet their efforts to shift the agenda to jobs, economic growth and immigration are often ignored by U.S. officials, said Bruce Bagley, an international studies professor at the University of Miami.

During a swing through South America in August, for example, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld spent most of his time talking about terrorism and drug trafficking and pressuring governments to isolate Chavez.

"He got a quite chilly reception," Bagley said.

Trade deal hits snag
Efforts to expand trade — once the raison d'être of the summit — have also received a cold shoulder by some Latin American governments because of Washington's insistence on maintaining lucrative subsidies for U.S. farmers.

Rather than pushing the Free Trade Area of the Americas, which would bind the economies of the U.S. and 33 countries, Washington is now focusing on less grandiose deals like the recently signed Central American Free Trade Agreement. That accord liberalized trade between the U.S. and six countries — Guatemala, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Panama and the Dominican Republic.

Experts predicted that Bush will work during his upcoming trip toward forging intermediate deals, like trade pacts with Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, that could move the larger hemispheric initiative down the road.

In Brazil, Bush will stop in for a visit with his counterpart, President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, widely known as Lula, whose government is mired in one of the worst political scandals in Brazilian history.

Hoping to keep friendly ties
Brazil has South America's biggest economy and is a major trade partner with the U.S., and Bush would like to keep the relationship friendly, experts said.

The president's last stop will be Panama for a visit with President Martin Torrijos. The U.S. is pushing for a widening of the Panama Canal, which would allow bigger ships and aircraft carriers to pass through.

julie.mason@chron.com john.otis@chron.com
 

judge wopner

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Gizmo
They sold their nickel reserves for cheap to a South African company (Rangold).

Uranium Resources PLC out of Britain own the rights to their richest uranium prospecting sites for 350,000 pounds sterling. Hardly earth shattering stuff.

It's one of the poorest countries in Africa...unofficial AIDS rate is around 20%...(unrelated, the director of a relief organization we sponsor two villages through from work there, was noting how she had to replace about 40%f of her workforce cos of aid's related illnesses or they drop out of the workforce due to the stigma..) Literacry rates are still really low.

Although the current Prime Minister is somewhat well regarded, he has a shitload of work to do before he can erase the decades of corruption.

Just wondering what benchmark you're using to make this claim about Tanzania...having good infrastructure....especially when you compare it other african nations like Ghana, Libya, Gabon and Botswana.
aids rates a poor indicator of prosperity considering South africa is considered the largest economy in Africa but has a massive aid infection rate.

im not suggesting tanzania is some pillar of wealth, just that from what ive read tanzania as a resource rich nation appears to be on a better track compared to the likes of fellow resource rich sierre lion, congo, nigeria and sudan. we all know the problesm these nations are facing.

libya is oil rich and again appears to be stepping up in their status as an oil nation but is run by a certain dictator and there doesnt seem to be a real productive sense of development or hope coming out of that country.

ghana ive heard is a wonderful place, that their biggest problem is keeping other refugees out of their borders. im not aware of any mass resource wealth on the scale of transforming a nation, though im sure they have some goodies.

no clue about gabon and bostwana.

its tanzania's leadership and futuer leadership taht really gets the grades from what ive read abou them. a few of my tanzanian buddies from work are considering moving back in a few years as they hear of increasing prosperity. (though that is more subjective evidence)

from tanzania check out http://www.jsmineset.com.
its a gold investment site but its author jim sinclair who after making bilions in gold opened a mine in tanzania, and inspite of its issues makes some good points in his archive about the prospects of the nation and the construction fo hospitals, roads, water facilities etc etc. an example of a business man involved in a typically exploitive enterprise but doing what appears to be something positive.

J
 
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