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Contracter question

R4V4G3D_SKU11S

TRIBE Member
I am having a bit of an issue with one of the companies that I have a contract to provide services to.

Basically they have cut a position and it doesn't look like they are going to fill it anytime soon. I am going to be absorbing some of the workload of this position. It is not in my field and not in my contract. That being said, I don't mind doing it at all. I just only have a limited amount of time in the day and it will impact how I can deliver the services that I am contracted for.

I guess I'm just looking for advice as to how to approach the subject with the Administrator that I have the contract with. I'm very happy there and don't want to look like a whiner but on the other hand I am pretty sure I am entitled to a reworking of the contract.
 

Flashy_McFlash

Well-Known TRIBEr
If you are sure that they are going to transfer some of the duties over, I would word your concerns in much the same way as you have here, and mention that while you don't mind assuming the position (hee), it may impact the quality of either the new duties or your primary duties. Stress that you place more importance and priority on the duties laid out in the contract.
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
Flashy's got the right idea. Make it sound more like you're asking for clarification on your priorities.

Explain to them that you can take on the new responsibilties, but that it could impact the things you're doing right now.
 
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ducke

TRIBE Member
Another good thing to consider is ASKING fellow co workers outside of your place of work .Hint around and see what type of feedback you get .

It never hurts to ask questions when it comes to the work place but you have to remember how to word your question or comments before hand - It can make a world of difference.


GOOD LUCK
 

R4V4G3D_SKU11S

TRIBE Member
Thanks for the help, guys. I guess I want to charge more since I'd be taking on more duties and want to make sure that I'm going about it in manner that will keep good relations with my client.
 
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deep

TRIBE Member
My take: Since your working relationship is still relatively new I'd say just try to stick it out for a little while longer and do everything you can with your primary duties as well as the secondary one. When you've been doing something beyond your job description for a few months straight, then there's legitimate basis to say that it has been an added functional demand to your workload. Before that point I think it constitutes just helping out with an unplanned need.

Employers generally will try to get as much out of a employee as possible for the amount that they're paid, most employees would obviously like more money for the work they do. Balancing the two interests is kind of a dance - the employee does a little more than they were originally asked to, they actually deliver, the employer then recognizes through pay/promotion/contract/recognition. If the employer does not recognize the added efforts then you have a pretty solid warning sign. But to negotiate a contract change or having added duties recognized through pay, you need to have a bit more evidence to show you actually delivered above and beyond.

If that's not the issue, and the new duties are simply affecting how well you can act in your primarily role, then that's all you need to say to have things scaled back.
 

Prickly Pete

TRIBE Member
I would go with the priorities thing. Say you want to effectively manage your time and that these new duties will be eating into your current duties time. I would say that you would very much like to take on the challenge of the new duties. While they may not offer you more money or to rework the contract right away, 2-3 months from now when you have proven that you can handle the new duties, and you want to get some extra compensation, they are well aware of the situation.
 

samsara

New Member
From what I remember - If the original terms of the contract have been altered, the contract is void. You’ve accepted while a binding contract existed, the terms of your offer haven’t changed, so you’re still on the line for your part of the bargain. If you wish to take on the new responsibility and you want to receive some type of consideration for your work you should enter into a new contract, or they may end up just giving you what was originally promised to you and nothing more. It all depends on the terms of this contract… if a time period was given for you to finish on this date, and you can’t because of the new responsibility that could look bad on you, so you might want to read into it and protect yourself.
 

deep

TRIBE Member
Another point - the reason why I think it would be a good idea to help out whatever way you can is to set a precedent. Demostrate that you're willing to take on new tasks, solve what problems there are beyond the minimal requirements. That kind of thing pays itself back when it comes time for performance reviews, promotions, more interesting work, chances for development and favours.
 
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Re: samsara - but how detailed is your contract Kevin?

If the exact job description isn't covered off, I'd do exactly what deep explains. If it is, then you can take the Flash approach keeping in mind what deep said.

Also, samsara - why did you pick that name?
 

Flashy_McFlash

Well-Known TRIBEr
deep said:
Another point - the reason why I think it would be a good idea to help out whatever way you can is to set a precedent. Demostrate that you're willing to take on new tasks, solve what problems there are beyond the minimal requirements. That kind of thing pays itself back when it comes time for performance reviews, promotions, more interesting work, chances for development and favours.
The lazy union asshole in me feels the opposite. Yours is excellent advice in certain - probably even most - companies and professions, but in the public sector at least, taking on a lot of extra responsibility with no compensation basically entitles you to years of abuse.

I try to spend at minimum ten minutes a day, staring blankly at my screen and drooling just so, in order to keep expectations low.

Your tax dollars at work.
 

deep

TRIBE Member
That's a good point, you have to evaluate the costs and benefits given the context. Beyond the public sector, large bloated companies also can exhibit the same structural characteristics you mention. Personally I would not want to be in a situation where workers can be exploited as you describe, so would not advocate being there in the first place letalone investing the extra effort.
 

Flashy_McFlash

Well-Known TRIBEr
deep said:
That's a good point, you have to evaluate the costs and benefits given the context. Beyond the public sector, large bloated companies also can exhibit the same structural characteristics you mention. Personally I would not want to be in a situation where workers can be exploited as you describe, so would not advocate being there in the first place letalone investing the extra effort.
I come for the benefits, I stay for the free parking.
 
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R4V4G3D_SKU11S

TRIBE Member
Thanks for the advice, guys. I think that waiting a bit is a good idea. At least then I can have an idea of exactly how it is going to impact my current responsibilities. If it does, it'll be easier to have concrete examples as opposed to projections.
 

lucky1

TRIBE Member
Job descriptions usually have the 5% other duties as assigned section.. so its hard to argue things aren't in your job description..
 
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R4V4G3D_SKU11S

TRIBE Member
lucky1 said:
Job descriptions usually have the 5% other duties as assigned section.. so its hard to argue things aren't in your job description..
My job description is pretty specific and the stuff I'm taking responsibility for is definetely not in mine. It would be akin to hiring a librarian and then asking them to also take over the cooks job. Totally different expertise.
 
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