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Common-Law Question...

the_fornicator

TRIBE Member
Before anybody gets on my ass, yes, I am currently doing a google search. Just wanna see who has any direct experience with this.

Anywho, what legally qualifies yourself and another person as a common law?

I've heard:
- living together for several years.
- living together for at least 6 months.

All I'm finding is a bunch of common law stats... not necessarily what legally deems two people with a common law status. Do you have to apply for this or is it just assumed?

Any info would be good... even a direction to google.
(can you tell I am doing my tax credit forms?) :p
 
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Dirty Girl

TRIBE Member
if you guys break up, you then have to always check the "seperated" box when you do your taxes, that is highly depressing.
 

SneakyPete

TRIBE Member
lol I remember you talking about that, are you still married? Maybe you can get a divorce and get half his assets.
 

the_fornicator

TRIBE Member
ha ha!! dirty, you rock.

I dunno, do the pros out-weight the cons when you're recognized as a common law vs single?

thread. amusing. me. laugh.
 

SJN

TRIBE Member
I believe that in Ontario, you are automatically deemed to be common-law after 2 years of living together, but that you can voluntarily deem yourselves to be common-law after as little as 6 months of living together.
I'm not 100% sure though...I'm going on memory at the moment.
 

pr0nstar

TRIBE Member
You don't have to claim it.. simple as that.
It's up to you...

The only benefit would be if you had kids together or one was in school and wanted a tax break for the working one... etc.

pr0nstar
 
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funky_citrus

TRIBE Member
I'd have to look at the legislation again, but I believe the last time I looked at it it was 3 years of co-habitation in order to apply for remedies under the family law reform act. It is similar to the Divorce act, but under the divorce act you must actually be a legally married spouse to apply under it. The FLRA has provisions for common-law, and i same-sex partnerships under it. Go onto the Government of Ontario website and look for the FLRA. It will tell you everything you need to know. Each province has different legislation, but when it comes to Legally married persons, it is under federal jurisdiction. Hope that helps.

~Leslie~
 

Dirty Girl

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by the_fornicator
ha ha!! dirty, you rock.

I dunno, do the pros out-weight the cons when you're recognized as a common law vs single?

thread. amusing. me. laugh.
the only reason I did it was cause (well 1. cause i thought I was gonna marry the fucker) and 2. i was supporting buddy and he was making fuck all, so i got more back on my taxes that year, which i didnt get anyway cause it went to osap,
im positive it is gonna come back to haunt me one day though:rolleyes:
 
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sk8

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by pr0nstar
You don't have to claim it.. simple as that.
It's up to you...
exactly

we lived together about 5 years before getting married and never claimed it.
 

KillaLadY

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by pr0nstar
You don't have to claim it.. simple as that.
It's up to you...

The only benefit would be if you had kids together or one was in school and wanted a tax break for the working one... etc.

pr0nstar
 
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