• Hi Guest: Welcome to TRIBE, the online home of TRIBE MAGAZINE. If you'd like to post here, or reply to existing posts on TRIBE, you first have to register. Join us!

CCC/CCC Bilingual - What is it?

Jeffsus

TRIBE Member
I can speak, read, and write French (amongst other languages) in a sort of working manner. As in, I took it all throughout school and five years in high school and did well in french public speaking contests etc. etc. Anyways, some years have passed and now I would consider myself to have a general, albeit rusty, working knowledge of French.

Some jobs I'm interested in require CCC/CCC bilingualism and I'm just wondering exactly (or approximately) how much French that really means....

I don't have to be a poet or anything do I?

-jM
A&D
 

exrboy

TRIBE Promoter
I used to work at a CCC. It could be a Customer Care Centre? Ie...you'd be doing customer service stuff in French/English.
 

KiFe

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by exrboy
I used to work at a CCC. It could be a Customer Care Centre? Ie...you'd be doing customer service stuff in French/English.


*shudder*

been there.
 

Jeffsus

TRIBE Member
It is not a "customer care centre."

CCC/CCC is some kind of (government?) measurement of qualification of competency or adequecy in a foreign language.

My question is, is CCC/CCC level bilingualism something like, "has a basic working knowledge of French" or "Can compose French poetry while transcripting documents"...?

Anyone?

-jM
A&D
 
tribe cannabis accessories silver grinders

mingster

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by exrboy
I used to work at a CCC. It could be a Customer Care Centre? Ie...you'd be doing customer service stuff in French/English.


if this is the case, and you're concerned about your french being adequate, it will probably depend on the job. for starters, you'll need good conversational french. and then, i'm assuming, you'll have to learn a certain language that pertains to the industry you're working in.

but if you're pretty good with languages, it's not difficult to regain your french, with a little practice (which you can get at work). but be careful, cause they might test you at an interview.
 

mingster

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Jeffsus
It is not a "customer care centre."

CCC/CCC is some kind of (government?) measurement of qualification of competency or adequecy in a foreign language.

My question is, is CCC/CCC level bilingualism something like, "has a basic working knowledge of French" or "Can compose French poetry while transcripting documents"...?

Anyone?

-jM
A&D


probably the former...but i would know more if i knew what CCC meant. it might mean more than just basic, it could mean fully functional.

i still think your level of success with working in french will depend on alot of the stuff in my first post...although this doesn't answer your question about qualification. can you find out what CCC menas?
 

Silvershadow

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Jeffsus
"has a basic working knowledge of French"
I do believe that's it... There are 3 different letters associated to each level, A, B, and C. A would be when you're COMPLETELY fluent in the language (for instance, if you're applying for a position as a translator, you'd have to be AAA in both English and French). C would be basic knowledge, if I'm not mistaken.

The reason why there are 3 C's is you need to be able to understand, to speak, and to read/write the language. So, basically, if you can only sort of make out stuff in French when somebody talks to you, but you can't speak it or read it, you wouldn't qualify.

If it's a government job, they'll probably have you pass a test anyway... or they'd have you take French lessons. It's worth a shot, either way.
 

I Like Ribs

New Member
General Second Official Languages Qualifications
Second official language qualifications and proficiency levels are identified objectively and are relevant to the duties and responsibilities of the position as it relates to communications with and services to the public and language of work.

Tests used to assess proficiency levels for general second language qualifications – A, B, or C – in written comprehension, written expression and oral proficiency are prescribed by the Public Service Commission.

These tests and standards apply to all occupational groups.

There are three levels of proficiency for general second official language qualifications:

  • A (lowest)
  • B
  • C (highest)
Oral Proficiency in the Second Official Language - Level A
Examples
A person at this level can carry out the following activities:

  • ask and answer simple questions about names, addresses, dates, times or numbers
  • make requests to colleagues or other employees and respond to such requests about simple and uncomplicated matters
  • give and follow simple directions and instructions
  • provide short, repetitive answers or information
  • exchange common courtesies (e.g., thank you, you’re welcome, have a nice day
Oral Proficiency in the Second Official Language - Level B
Examples
A person at this level can carry out the activities of level A and can also:

  • give and follow straightforward instructions or explanations about how work is to be done, what information is needed and what steps or alternatives are to be followed
  • give factual accounts of actions taken or events that have occurred
  • handle requests for routine information from other employees or members of the public, either by telephone or in face-to-face conversations (e.g., about such things as services, publications, or staffing actions)
  • take part in departmental or interdepartmental meetings regarding factual, concrete and non-routine topics, and/or informal meetings or work sessions
  • deliver presentations on concrete topics, and answer factual follow-up questions
  • answer the telephone, understand simple requests, redirect calls as appropriate, and/or explain to others how to complete a form

Oral Proficiency in the Second Official Language - Level C
Examples
A person at this level can carry out the activities at levels A and B and can also:

  • give and understand explanations and descriptions involving complicated details, hypothetical questions, or complex and abstract ideas
  • give and understand detailed accounts of events, actions taken, or procedures to be followed
  • discuss or explain policies, procedures, regulations, programs and services relating to an area of work
  • deal with situations requiring persuasion/negotiation and complex arguments, and/or the seamless exchange of ideas in both official languages
  • deliver presentations on complex topics, and answer follow-up questions and/or conduct training sessions
  • counsel and give advice to employees or clients on sensitive or complex issues
  • participate as a member of a selection board, interview board, or assessment team as an integral part of the job functions

Hope this helps ... 15 years later.
 
Top