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Canada's copyright law has changed. Are you going to use VPNs now?

Are you going to use a VPN service to protect yourself from lawsuits?

  • I already use a VPN for torrents

    Votes: 4 26.7%
  • I will be setting up a VPN for torrents

    Votes: 1 6.7%
  • Nope. Why bother.

    Votes: 10 66.7%

  • Total voters
    15
  • Poll closed .

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
Canada's new copyright law changed yesterday. It allows copyright holders to force ISPs to give them user data much easier, and I suspect people will start seeing financial demand notices in their mail from legal firms representing "claimants" like movie studios and media conglomerates.

Are you going to use VPN to privatize your downloading?
 

greginhali

TRIBE Member
I was thinking this exact thing. With the new law it seems torrenting might be troublesome.

Streaming is great for movies. But music needs to be on a harddrive.

Im interested if others are going to move to VPN as well?
 
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alexd

Administrator
Staff member
Maybe I can pitch some of the VPN providers to see if we can get a TRIBE discount. If enough TRIBErs are interested in using VPN I can probably get a decent discount.
 

Bernnie Federko

TRIBE Member
My issue with VPN is bandwidth. My preference is DNS masking, which is a good work around for this problem. And it's great for resolving region blocking situations.
 

Bass-Invader

TRIBE Member
I'd assume that SSL-encrypted trackers on private sites would be sufficient, no?

-- Jay aka Fut
Only if you are confident that there are no law-enforcement, or content owner, or consultant (freelancers who sell tracker information to content owners) members on those sites.

In other words, probably not.
 

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
It Looks Like Netflix Is Cracking Down On VPN 'Pirating'

It's one of the internet's open secrets that if you don't live in the US, but wish you did because of the better Netflix offerings, you can use any number of Chrome extensions or VPNs to get around the geo-blocker. However, it looks like the free ride might be coming to an end, as Netflix is starting to crack down on the practice.

As TorrentFreak has noted, Netflix has recently taken up blocking some services that get around geo-blockers. They're targeting VPNs, which tunnel traffic through a particular service, and DNS-spoofing websites, which simply serve to change your virtual location. Blocking isn't widespread for now — Hola Better Internet, a hugely popular Chrome extension, is still functioning — but as TorrentFreak points out, this could easily be a test of a more blanket block that is yet to be introduced.

Blocking geo-pirates is a logical step for the content providers, who have thus far concentrated more on streaming and torrenting websites in their crusade against the internet. But since geo-piracy is easy to detect, and legally and technically relatively simple to take measures against, it was really only a matter of time.

It Looks Like Netflix Is Cracking Down On VPN 'Pirating' 
 

Bass-Invader

TRIBE Member
My issue with VPN is bandwidth. My preference is DNS masking, which is a good work around for this problem. And it's great for resolving region blocking situations.
I assume by DNS masking, you are referring to using a proxy - where the ip address of the proxy shows up in the tracker rather than your own (but the proxy internally forwards traffic between yourself and your tracker.)

This is safe only as long as the proxy is trustworthy and not in a jurisdiction where they can be quietly seized by law enforcement.
 
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erika

TRIBE Member
You missed an option in your poll:
"I don't download because I have friends who work in the film biz and believe they should be able to earn a living"...
 

CiG

TRIBE Member
You missed an option in your poll:
"I don't download because I have friends who work in the film biz and believe they should be able to earn a living"...
Time to change jobs, if they are not earning a living that is.

----

Anyone have a link to the copyright law/act?
 

acheron

TRIBE Member
You missed an option in your poll:
"I don't download because I have friends who work in the film biz and believe they should be able to earn a living"...
I download because I have relatives who are copyright lawyers and therefore it's in my blood to rape content owners.
 

derek

TRIBE Member
can you elaborate?
with a vpn you'll sacrifice bandwidthh & d/l speed. i have viper vpn and even with that i can only get a 5 mbps vs the 25 i normally get.

i still torrent (private tracker) and use a seed host (in europe)for run the torrents. i d/l through an encrypted ftp. so there's two barriers one needs to get through to see my transactions. no need for vpn in this setup
 
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Maui

TRIBE Member
You missed an option in your poll:
"I don't download because I have friends who work in the film biz and believe they should be able to earn a living"...
I doubt any of your friends in the film business are in any movies that anyone would ever care to download. Just sayin....
 

Bass-Invader

TRIBE Member
https://torrentfreak.com/0-more-on-content-than-honest-consumers-130510/

That is all I have to say. Our household spends thousands on media(books, music, movies, TV shows on DVD/bluray) in any given year.

Also, newsgroups over https...seems good enough to me. Means the copyright police would also have to break open and decrypt packets, which to my knowledge is still illegal.
They could force the news host to relinquish their logs, or in the case of hosts who do not keep logs, they could get a court order to quietly compel them to do so. Again, only if the host is in a jurisdiction where they can be compelled to do that. Most of the non-US ones are in the Netherlands I think where it's not as easy to do that.
 

Aaron Bradley

TRIBE Promoter
Only if you are confident that there are no law-enforcement, or content owner, or consultant (freelancers who sell tracker information to content owners) members on those sites.

In other words, probably not.
Exactly the reason for my Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm up above. Guys, VPN and using proxies only helps for that transmission of data. It doesn't hide the fact that you did it if either end (especially the source) is in cahoots with the law.
 
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erika

TRIBE Member
Time to change jobs, if they are not earning a living that is.

----

Anyone have a link to the copyright law/act?
They are earning a living (one is actually a very successful film producer); and I would like them to keep doing that!
 

Bernnie Federko

TRIBE Member
At the end of the day, one can only do so much prevention. If The Man wants to go at You, they will more than likely win. Why? Because they have the bigger payroll, bigger weapons, and no time limit. It's just that simple.
 

djfear

TRIBE Member
They are earning a living (one is actually a very successful film producer); and I would like them to keep doing that!
I once had to pirate a video game I bought at the store (Deus Ex Human Revolution) because the steam portion simply wasn't working. Stupidest fucking thing ever... it was easier to download the whole game by clicking on the torrent and wait a few hours and install the perfectly good running copy than to use the one I bought. It didn't even make sense to me to try to just download a crack because the all-in-one package was simply easier to do and required a few less minutes worth of work.

Also, I once pirated a game my cousin worked on (Simpsons Hit & Run). :p
 

Ho||yw0oD

TRIBE Member
There are many people who feel entitled to free content, on the backs of many legally-abiding others who pay for that same content. If everyone felt that same sense of entitlement, we would see a significant reduction in the quality and quantity of content. Just sayin'.
 
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