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Can I borrow a cup of beats?

headwinds

TRIBE Promoter
This thread is inspired by the those trapped in this padded breaks room....I would hazard a guess that many if not most breaks DJs roam freely around this messageboard and boards across toronto and the world.

part 1

Do you as dj or fan appreciate the advice and musicality of the neighboring tribe rooms?

part 2

a question to the breaks dj/producers -- when you produce breaks, do you regularly sample breakbeats or like the pioneers of breakbeats create this tempo and time signature through

1. sampling from live instruments like jazz or afrobeat?

2. play and record from your own instruments?

3. sample from house, jungle, or other electronic genres and then manipulate the beats?

4. use totally computer generated beats?

just curious on where you generally stand in on the issue of musical inspiration and influence in relation to your contemporary electronic audio artists -- are you listening to what they have to say?
 

!Myagi!

TRIBE Member
Ok, here we go....
Originally posted by headwinds
part 1
Do you as dj or fan appreciate the advice and musicality of the neighboring tribe rooms?
I don't cross over too much, because quite frankly, i am, as of this point in time, only interested in what goes on in the breaks room...i try to spend as little time as possible in front of my computer if im not writing songs
part 2

a question to the breaks dj/producers -- when you produce breaks, do you regularly sample breakbeats or like the pioneers of breakbeats create this tempo and time signature through
I sample breaks and whole sounds, split them up and rearrange them, and i tend to make my own drum sounds on synths, etc. I dont use straight breaks anymore, because frankly, its been done for years and its very hard to navigate your way through that without being accused of using an "easy" loop, or a loop that every one knows and may as well be treated like its own instrument....apache, amen, funky drummer, etc.
1. sampling from live instruments like jazz or afrobeat?
I sample live instruments a LOT, mostly because I have them and I can play them...the brunt of my body of work as MYAGI includes myself on, bass, guitar, keys, etc on almost every track, because i really dont like sampling other people if i can avoid it.....its kind of ironic that "wish you well" was my first single...... ;)
2. play and record from your own instruments?
see above....do it like crazy
3. sample from house, jungle, or other electronic genres and then manipulate the beats?
This is something I've been doing a lot lately, mainly because most of the stuff I've been working on falls into a kind of no-mans-land that rides the boundries of breaks and house....its a nice way of keeping the sound fresh well opening peoples ears a bit.
4. use totally computer generated beats?
Yeah, sometimes.....I'm big on FX, and ill usually create a beat on rebirth or some other softsynth just for the purposes of fucking with it till its unrecognizeable funky ass rhythmic noise.....long live the ring mod!!!
just curious on where you generally stand in on the issue of musical inspiration and influence in relation to your contemporary electronic audio artists -- are you listening to what they have to say? [/B]
YES and NO......i used to read a magazine called Future Music, which i treated as a bible that you could buy in monthly installments. After about 4 years of reading it non-stop, I decided that there were only so many BEST SYNTHS EVER, and so i stopped buying it and started actually learning to be creative instead of relying on the newest and best digital virtual analog emulation blah blah blah that came on the market.
I dont think I've ever used a preset patch in my life, and though I DO sample, its only if the sample is for cheesy fun value (ie wish you well), or if its something im gonna screw with until it may as well be its own instrument.
I have very little respect when it comes to straight sampling, and theres a good reason why (in my mind)....guys like norman cook (who i DO respect) can simply build massive sample libraries, and then cut and paste their way to musical stardom.
This isnt to suggest that he's not writing new songs, because he is, but the backing loops on each song on Gutter and Stars can be heard on other remixes he's done, etc. That ruins it for me, and theres a LOT of other producers who do the same....I just want to make sure that I never start to do that, and so I never use the same loop twice, not without at least mangling it first.
As for advise, I take it from prodcuers more than DJs......I love DJ'ing and I love DJ's, but I've been a musician for a LOT longer than I've been spinning, so the brunt of my respect lies with people who do both....and the tips Ive gotten from my contemporaries in that regard (melting man, scissorkicks, simon paul etc.,) means a LOT more to me than reading some interview in MIXMAG with some superstar DJ who wants to share the incredible technology of MIXMAN STUDIO PRO with the world so everyone who owns a computer can start to produce their own "hits."
The thing i respect most is intricacy, and the guy whose drum programming most consistantly blows me away is TOUCHE from the WISEGUYS.....not for his fast breaks stuff, but for his soul filled midtempo tracks, which have the most original, intricate, well produced drums I have EVER heard....almost any track will do, but SWEET BABY TRUTH is particularly amazing...I think hes the only guy I ever really pay attention to in terms of learning anything.......not like I think im amazing or something, but its just that I really dont want to sound like everyone else.


wow thats a lot of writing
g'nite :)
 

Angus Robinson

TRIBE Member
I don't produce, but I know that for a track to sound proper, its gotta have both synthetic and organic samples... if you only use one of the two, you're in trouble ;)
 

!Myagi!

TRIBE Member
sho nuff'
its all about balance, and i think thats why I took so long to begin to get into nu-skool stuff (even though i DONT belive in genres).....i felt it was too electronic and too cold. Though my opinion has since changed.
But yeah angus, i agree, its got to have both.
 

The Electrician

TRIBE Promoter
actually I wouldn't say that entitly Angus.. there has been much music made with pure organic samples and there has been much made with pure electronic samples....


I see your point about the = between both and within both.. Im just sayng dont limit yourself.. that may sound weird b/c we are talking about both and you would think both should be full of possibilities... but sometimes trying to make a track with both elec. and organic sounds could actually hinder the song....


my motto latly is "do what ever it takes for something to happen or to be good"


I stand by that for now anyways...

later, beer is wearing off...
Wes
 
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MartyMcFly

TRIBE Promoter
As a person
-------------
I like the general, up coming events, & the breaks forum.


As a DJ
------------
I only spam & occationally but not intentionally upset certain dJ's
by opening my BIG DJ MOUTH before thinking.


As a MAN-whore ;) I love every section in tribe.
---------------------------------------------------------
I remember back in January I had to change my tribe profile..
it was TOO HOT FOR TRIBE!!!!
 
Hey big D,
as for Tribe, I only check the breaks room

As for recording, I do 1, 2 & 4.

Angus is absolutely right, you need both organic & electroninic these days. If you want more than a
small sub genre of people to buy your music, then it's definitely worth playing with everything you can
get your hands on. If you have a knack for balancing it all out to mesh well together, then you'll have
a full bodied track. Organic alone gets you labelled "funky". Electronic alone gets you "Nu Skool" Keep
inbetween and you can dodge the labels. Same thing with the 4/4 breaks idea. My next
single is 4/4 with some breaks influence. I hope to broaden my fan base by being more diverse with the beats.
Breaks has always been the most experimental genre, so you might as well
take advantage of that fact. - Melting Man
 

headwinds

TRIBE Promoter
tricky.gif


saul.gif

saul williams

What about the human voice as an instrument? does the rhythm of language (singing, rapping, sprechensang, etc) effect your beats?

Who would be your dream vocal collaborator?

And what about the popularity of the computer-distorted voice (vocoder)? Have you ever disguised your own voice in your tracks?

Bjork.AIFOfLove.01.jpg
 

MartyMcFly

TRIBE Promoter
What about the human voice as an instrument? does the rhythm of language (singing, rapping, sprechensang, etc) effect your beats?

yeah totally...
beat boxing is another good example of that.
all sounds can be made into a rhythm
you belt out THOSE Beats or sing those samples yourself.
 

!Myagi!

TRIBE Member
rhythm of anything affects my beats.....no sound exists without rhythm, and therefore all sound is rhythm...
im really not too into vocals though unless they are either funny or in an epic sound, circa get down massive.
soulful tracks really get on my nerves, and i think the only real vocal track ive liked in the last year has been simon pauls remix the sun.
big up yoself!
 
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