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Bush defends invasion of Iraq

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
Bush defends invasion of Iraq
No such thing as `ironclad evidence'
Tells NBC he was dealing with madman


TIM HARPER
WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF

WASHINGTON - Regime change in Iraq has been worth the loss of more than 500 American lives, U.S. President George W. Bush says — even without the discovery of the weapons of mass destruction.

Bush, in an hour-long interview aired yesterday on NBC's Meet the Press defended his decision to invade Iraq by saying he was dealing with a "madman" in deposed dictator Saddam Hussein.

In those circumstances, he said, there's "no such thing ... as ironclad, absolutely solid evidence" to justify a pre-emptive strike.

"The evidence I had was the best possible evidence that he (Saddam) had a weapon," Bush said.

When interviewer Tim Russert told him that may have been wrong, Bush replied:

"Well, but what wasn't wrong was the fact that he had the ability to make a weapon. That wasn't wrong."

In sitting down with a man who has a Washington reputation as the sharpest interrogator on U.S. network television, Bush was essentially kicking off the 2004 election campaign, a faceoff which is looking more and more likely to pit him against Massachusetts Senator John Kerry.

After the Bush interview, Kerry, riding a wave of Democratic party support, accused the president of shifting the rationale for the war and "telling Americans stories" in the invasion build-up.

Kerry won three more landslide votes over the weekend in his bid to win the Democratic nomination.

After capturing Washington and Michigan on Saturday, Kerry added Maine to his list of caucus victories.

With a sweep of two crucial southern primaries in Virginia and Tennessee tomorrow, Kerry, who is positioning himself as the mainstream presidential candidate and branding the Bush White House extreme, can all but lock up his party's presidential nomination.

A flurry of polls released in the U.S. in the last few days show Bush's push for a second term is appearing increasingly at risk.

The president trails Kerry in at least two national polls and is in a statistical dead heat with him in another. One national poll put his approval rating at 48 per cent, the same approval percentage his father, President George H.W. Bush had at this point in 1992 as he proceeded to defeat at the hands of Bill Clinton.

A Time/CNN poll released yesterday said 55 per cent of Americans have "doubts and reservations" about Bush and less than half, 44 per cent, said he is a leader they can trust.

Without referring directly to Kerry, Bush denied he had even considered the possibility of defeat in November.

"I'm not going to lose," he said bluntly. Americans, he said, will choose their next president based on which man can use the country's power to make the world a better place.

Bush has been particularly wounded by the findings of his former chief weapons inspector, David Kay, who told a Congressional committee that it appeared everyone was wrong about the weapons of mass destruction in Iraq and the threat posed by Saddam before the American-led invasion.

That has stolen any bump in popularity the president had garnered with December's capture of Saddam.

Bush said in the interview that parents of dead American soldiers need to know their sacrifice was not in vain.

"A free Iraq will make it easier for other children in our own country to grow up in a safer world," he said.

Bush said he fully expected to find weapons stockpiles.

"They could have been destroyed during the war," he said. "Saddam and his henchmen could have destroyed them as we entered into Iraq. They could be hidden. They could have been transported to another country."

Bush also said Saddam could have developed nuclear weapons, although not immediately, and as a wartime president he had make tough decisions and not wait for Saddam to change his stripes.

"Now the president is giving us a new reason for sending people to war, and the problem is not just that he is changing his story now, it is that it appears he was telling the American people stories in 2002," said Kerry, who supported the Congressional resolution which authorized the Bush war.

The death of an American soldier in a roadside bombing south of Baghdad yesterday brought the American death toll to 531 since the U.S. invaded Iraq in March, 2003.

In the hour-long interview, which was taped in the Oval Office Saturday, Bush also took pointed questions on the whereabouts of Osama bin Laden, the ongoing controversy over whether he completed his own National Guard training, and the record deficit he has run up in three years in office.

He said he had "no idea" whether U.S. forces are close to capturing bin Laden.

He blamed the controversy over his National Guard obligations to "politics" and said he has been dealing with unsubstantiated charges since running for governor of Texas a decade ago.

Although Bush received an honourable discharge from the National Guard on Oct. 1, 1973, there has never been a record produced proving he served a six-month stint in Alabama as required.

Democrats have said he went "AWOL" at that point and say they relish a debate on the issue with their probable nominee who was awarded a Purple Heart and Silver Star for his Vietnam heroism.

Bush requested a transfer in May, 1972 to the Alabama National Guard to work on a U.S. Senate campaign, and was suspended from flying in August of that year after failing to complete an medical exam. Military records don't show that Bush ever completed drills.

"There may be no evidence, but I did report. Otherwise, I wouldn't have been honourably discharged. I did show up in Alabama."

Bush said he would authorize the release of any documents relating to his guard service during that period, "if we still have them."

He said the records are kept in Colorado and have already been "scoured," but he could offer no reason why they have not been found.

http://www.torontostar.com/NASApp/c...466&call_pageid=968332188492&col=968793972154
 

Boss Hog

TRIBE Member
040209_bush_george_250.jpg
 

Subsonic Chronic

TRIBE Member
How many times have they changed the justification for invading Iraq now?

Just say "oil" and get it over with. You're not fooling anyone anymore Bush.
 
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stir-fry

TRIBE Member


http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/nation/7918924.htm

Bush to Release Military Pay Records
TERENCE HUNT
Associated Press

WASHINGTON - The White House, facing election-year questions about President Bush's military service, is releasing pay records and other information intended to support his assertion that he fulfilled his duty as a member of the Air National Guard during the Vietnam war.

The material, to be released Tuesday, was to include pay records and annual retirement point summaries to show that Bush served.

"These records clearly document that the president fulfilled his duty," White House press secretary Scott McClellan said.

The point summaries were released during the 2000 presidential campaign but the pay records were not obtained by the White House until late Monday from the Air Reserve Personnel Center in Denver, Colo., McClellan said. He said the center, apparently acting on its own, reviewed Bush's records and came up with the pay information.

"It was our impression from the Texas Air National Guard - they stated they didn't have them," he said. "It was also our impression those records didn't exist." Bush on Sunday authorized the release of his Guard records. McClellan said the latest material apparently is all of Bush's records.

The pay information documented the dates when Bush showed up for Guard duty, the spokesman said. "You are paid for the dates you served," McClellan added.

Bush's military record was raised as an issue in the 2000 campaign and was revived this year by Democratic National Committee Chairman Terry McAuliffe, who called Bush "AWOL" - absent without leave - during a period of his service when he was in Alabama.

Asked if the records should end the controversy about Bush's service, McClellan said, "You have to ask those who made these outrageous accusations if they stand by them in the face of this documentation that demonstrates he served and fulfilled his duties."

Bush enlisted in the Texas Air National Guard in 1968 shortly before graduating from Yale University.

Questions have been raised about whether family connections helped him get into the Guard when there were waiting lists for what was seen as an easy billet. Bush says no one in his family pulled strings and that he got in because others didn't want to commit to the almost two years of active duty required for fighter pilot training.

A central issue is whether he showed up for duty while assigned to Guard units in Alabama, where he worked on a political campaign in 1972. "There may be no evidence, but I did report," Bush told NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday. "Otherwise, I wouldn't have been honorably discharged."

Another question is why he was allowed to end Guard duty about six months early to attend Harvard Business School. Bush said on NBC that he had "worked it out with the military. And I'm just telling you, I did my duty."

McClellan said the White House would release statements - previously distributed - from Albert Lloyd Jr., who was personnel director for the Texas Air National Guard from 1969 to 1995 and who reviewed Bush's military records at the request of his campaign four years ago.

Lloyd has said that Bush's early discharge was not uncommon for pilots or other crewmen who were to leave soon and had been trained on now-obsolete jets, as was Bush's case.



*******************

well, that's it folks.. case closed.. he got payed, so he must have attended!
 

stir-fry

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Rocky
Does anything in this guys voice suggest that he's telling the truth?

This guy is so terrible at bullshitting. I can just see him squirming in his seat.


I downloaded a video of a conference that he held one day and the question was whether it was true that bush had prior knowledge of 911 as some other politican had insinuated, or was the politician just bordering on hate speech??

his answer; "well.. uh.. there's a time for politics.. and uhh.. there's a time for politics.. and uhh.. time for politics"

I can send it to you if you want..
 
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