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Barry Bonds......Inhuman??

kennyboy

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by vench
there are so many factors that one can use to determine why he's hitting so many home runs.

- the pitching is weak
- lighter, juiced (not on purpose) balls
- quality of bats
- he can just hit the ball

him being stronger will obviously amount to hitting more homeruns, but his swing is a home run swing, I expect him to get at least a double in every at-bat.

he can hit, that's for sure.


vench

Pitching may be weak, but it's weak for everyone.
Balls? Same for everyone
Bats? Anyone in the bigs can get a good bat.

That leaves us with the fact that the man can flat out hit. I think his hand - eye is probably the best in the league. The fact that he is a monster means that a lot of those hits are out of the park, but even if he wasn't huge, I think he would still be a force.
 
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vench

TRIBE Promoter
Originally posted by kennyboy
Pitching may be weak, but it's weak for everyone.
Balls? Same for everyone
Bats? Anyone in the bigs can get a good bat.

That leaves us with the fact that the man can flat out hit. I think his hand - eye is probably the best in the league. The fact that he is a monster means that a lot of those hits are out of the park, but even if he wasn't huge, I think he would still be a force.

if you noticed I've been saying all along that he can hit, regardless of the conditions.

even if he wasn't as big as he is, he'd still hit at least 35+ home runs.


vench
 

kennyboy

TRIBE Member
Vench, I'm with you. I was trying to build my case for all the haters.

All I hear is how Bonds is on something. Well, maybe he is, but you can't deny his skills. I hope he hits 100 taters this year.
 

vench

TRIBE Promoter
people need something to complain about.

was he on juice when he was skinny as fuck and a 40-40 man??

or was it 30-30??

either way... he was hitting home runs long before he moved to San Fran.

I don't really care for him but he's good.



vench
 

kennyboy

TRIBE Member
I'm not the biggest fan of his either, but I respect his talent.

Much in the same way that I'm not a Tiger Woods fan, but I respect what he does.

Having played a number of sports at a very competitive level, I realize how good you have to be to make it in the big leagues. And then to excel at that level is something completely different. Take your average, journeyman player in any sport. On most levels they are amazing atheletes and very highly skilled, for the most part anyway. Now take that up about 10 levels and you have a superstar such as bonds or Tiger. Even in a sport such as curling or bowling, the skill level is extremely high. That I respect.
 
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butter418

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by kennyboy
Vench, I'm with you. I was trying to build my case for all the haters.

All I hear is how Bonds is on something. Well, maybe he is, but you can't deny his skills. I hope he hits 100 taters this year.

And even if he was on something it's not like the other players aren't and he's still that much better and add in the fact that he must see the least amount of pitches ever in the history of the game you will see that he is just so far ahead of everyone else in the sport. This is like Gretzky domination in his heyday.
 

Vote Quimby

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by butter418
psst... I wasn't talking about just the fallout from baseball. Bonds alleged source is the same source as the track and field team which the US qualified for.

If it hasn't slipped yet or hasn't slipped about all the other athletes that have been doped then it probably won't now..
Maybe, but the recently executed search warrant was for baseball players only, not athletes in other sports.
 

butter418

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Vote Quimby
Maybe, but the recently executed search warrant was for baseball players only, not athletes in other sports.

I understand your point.

I really do.


All I am saying is that it would not be able to be contained to just baseball because of how interconnected the allegations are.
 

fleaflo

TRIBE Member
Source Check out this interview with Gary Sheffield where he talks about Barry Bonds.

There are many reasons Yankees outfielder Gary Sheffield and Giants slugger Barry Bonds don't hang out together anymore, but one of the biggest is the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative.

In testimony before a federal grand jury last year, Sheffield admitted to unwittingly having used a steroid cream -- saying he didn't know it contained anything illegal -- that he got from BALCO after Bonds introduced him to the lab's products, according to a report in the Oct. 11 issue of Sports Illustrated.

Sheffield told the magazine that he thought "the cream" was cortisone-based -- he applied it to his surgically repaired knee -- and that he so little suspected its true ingredients that he openly kept it in his locker.

"I was mad. I want everybody to be on an even playing field," Sheffield told the magazine.

Bonds, through a spokesperson, declined to address Sheffield's comments in the magazine, saying only, "I wish nothing but the best for Gary. I want him to win the MVP. He deserves it."

Sheffield, who spends much of the article detailing what he considers to be Bonds' character flaws and explaining why he no longer wants to be a friend of Bonds', said he was shocked and angry when it was reported that BALCO's "the cream" and "the clear" were designer steroids.

The two stars trained together; in fact, Sheffield reportedly lived at Bonds' home for several weeks before the 2002 season. Both worked out with Bonds' trainer, Greg Anderson, who was indicted Feb. 12 on charges of conspiring to distribute performance-enhancing drugs. According to SI, Bonds also introduced Sheffield to BALCO president Victor Conte, who was indicted with Anderson and two other men.

"[Bonds] said, 'I got guys here, they can get your urine and blood and prescribe a vitamin specifically for your blood type and what your body needs,' " Sheffield told SI. "And that's what I did."

The relationship between Sheffield and Bonds began to sour while they trained. Sheffield said he felt like he was treated like a child while a guest at Bonds' house.

"I don't want friends like that," Sheffield told SI. "I will never have friends like that."

Examples of petty behavior by Bonds, as described by Sheffield to SI:
Bonds insisted that Sheffield live at his house, not rent a car, and not pay for anything. Sheffield said he did bring his personal chef with him.

"[It was], 'It's my way or no way,' " Sheffield told the magazine. "I'm not a child. I make $11 million. I can buy what I want."

To show his thanks to Bonds for inviting him to stay in his home, Sheffield arranged for the two to see a boxing match in Miami in 2002.

"I was going to pay for the plane, the flight, pay for the limo service, the hotel," Sheffield told the magazine. "He gets my mail. He looks in my mail and sees he can get better seats, so he gets better seats. He can get a better flight, so he gets a better flight. He can get a better limo service. And he can get a better hotel. So basically my plan, in trying to do something in return, he wound up doing it. And [that sort of behavior] just escalated."

There also was a time when Sheffield arranged for a limo and tickets for the two to see a Lakers-Kings game in Sacramento.

"He complained the whole drive," Sheffield told the magazine. " 'Man, I could have drove. We would have gotten there a lot faster.' The whole time. And I'm saying to myself, Never again. Never again."

The breaking point occurred, Sheffield told SI, one morning when Bonds left for their workout without him, leaving Sheffield to find his own ride to the gym. When Sheffield arrived, he found Bonds laughing at him with someone he later learned was a writer for Men's Journal.

"He sold me out to the media," Sheffield said.

Sheffield ended the relationship soon after. According to SI, on the flight home to Florida with his chef, the chef told him, "Gary, I want to confess something. [Bonds] made an offer to hire me: He'll get me a car, give me a place to stay and pay off my student loan."

Sheffield told the magazine he and his chef soon parted ways. About a month later, Bonds called to inquire why the chef was no longer working for Sheffield -- without Bonds mentioning that he had hired him.

"That's the kind of person I found out I was dealing with," Sheffield told SI.
 
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kuba

TRIBE Member
I don't care anymore what kind of person he is, I just want him to break the record. It would be cool if he was barry sanders-esque, and retired one HR short, but his ego would prevent that.
 

-Mercury-

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by vench
if "they" want to sweep his alleged steroid use under the carpet they will. they did it with Carl Lewis in '84 and have done it dozens of more times.

the United States of America is a country of smokescreens.

vench


exactly!
 

fleaflo

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Vote Quimby
I read that on SI's website today. And to think people still think Bonds is clean.
At no time did I read Sheffield accuse Bonds of using anything. The steroid cream was probably used to help get rid of the scar tissue left over from Sheffields knee injury.
 

butter418

TRIBE Member
Anyone think Bonds will win another MVP this year.

Here are his stats for 2004.

Games 147
At Bats 373
Runs 129
Hits 135
2B 27
3B 3
Home Runs 45
RBI 101
TB 303
Walks 232
Strike Outs 41
SB 6
Caught 1
On Base 0.609 WTF is anyone else just in awe of this. This is the highest ever in the history of MLB I think.
Slugging 0.812 Over 800 again.
 
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agentRC4

TRIBE Member
bonds is the best player of our generation hands down. No one not even A-rod influences a opposing teams like Bonds does. Maguire didn't do it, Sosa never did either - A-rod sometimes, but Bonds has the quickest hands in the world. Inside pitches are gone every time. Bonds is more patient at the plate and you never see him swing a shitty picthes outside or close to a strike.

Bonds is top 5 ever to play the game. 8 gold gloves - 500 homers and 500 steals - no one will ever -EVER match that!!!!!!!

thats enough right there!
 

Eclipze

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by OhNo!
barry bonds is the greatest ball player of our generation.

perhaps the second greatest ball player of all time behind willie mays.

he may be the greatest hitter of our time, but i wouldn't go as far as saying he is the greatest ball player of our generation
 

Vote Quimby

TRIBE Member
Bonds bombshell
Report: Slugger admitted to using substances thought to be steroids

Posted: Friday December 3, 2004 1:50AM; Updated: Friday December 3, 2004 6:10PM


SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Barry Bonds testified to a grand jury that he used a clear substance and a cream given to him by a trainer who was indicted in a steroid-distribution ring, but said he didn't know they were steroids, the San Francisco Chronicle reported Friday.

Bonds told the federal grand jury last year that Greg Anderson, his personal trainer and childhood friend, told him the substances he used in 2003 were the nutritional supplement flaxseed oil and a rubbing balm for arthritis, according to a transcript of his testimony reviewed by the Chronicle.

The substances Bonds described were similar to ones known as "the clear" and "the cream," two steroids from the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative at the center of the steroid scandal.

Bonds' attorney, Michael Rains, said Friday that the leak of grand jury testimony was an attempt to smear his client. Grand jury transcripts are sealed and the Chronicle did not say who showed them the documents.

Rains described Anderson and Bonds as close friends who had been training together for about the last four years.

"Greg knew what Barry's demands were. Nothing illegal," Rains said at a news conference in Oakland. "This is Barry's best friend in the world. Barry trusted him. He trusts him today. He trusts that he never got anything illegal from Greg Anderson."

Even if the substances Bonds took were steroids, Rains said they were not banned by baseball at the time and the slugger believed they were natural. Bonds also maintains the substances did nothing to aid his rise as one of the game's greatest home run hitters, Rains said.

"Barry was tested several times this year and the results of those tests were negative," said Bonds' agent, Jeff Borris.

"He put together statistically one of the most remarkable seasons ever," Borris said in an interview. "There are people in this world whose sole purpose is to try and figure out ways on how to undermine the accomplishments of others."

Giants spokesman Blake Rhodes said the team wouldn't comment and directed all questions to the commissioner's office.

Tony Serra, Anderson's lawyer, said Anderson "never knowingly provided illegal substances to anyone."

The revelation of Bonds' grand jury testimony was one of a series of developments in the BALCO probe, which led to indictments against four men in February.

ABC News and ESPN the Magazine released excerpts of interviews with BALCO founder Victor Conte, one of those charged in the case, in which he says he watched Olympic track star Marion Jones inject herself in the leg with human growth hormone. Jones' attorneys denied she ever used performance-enhancing drugs. Conte's interview with ABC's 20/20 was to air Friday night.

And sprinter Kelli White, who has been banned from track for two years after admitting use of several banned substances, broke down and cried Thursday as she recounted in an interview the first time she used THG, a once-undetectable steroid that BALCO is accused of providing to elite athletes. White's comments appeared in the Chronicle, Los Angeles Times and USA Today.

On Thursday, the Chronicle reported Yankees slugger Jason Giambi told the grand jury he injected himself with human growth hormone in 2003 and also used steroids for at least three seasons.

Before Friday's Bonds story was published, San Francisco-based U.S. Attorney Kevin Ryan sent letters to two Chronicle reporters asking for documents and the names of sources used in their BALCO coverage, according to the newspaper. Ryan said his office was concerned about the leaks and asked the Justice Department to investigate.

Chronicle Editor Phil Bronstein said the reporters would not violate their guarantees of confidentiality to sources.

Dozens of elite athletes testified before the grand jury last year, including baseball stars Bonds, Giambi and Gary Sheffield, and track stars Jones, White and Tim Montgomery.

The probe led to some athletes being banned from the Olympics and left a cloud of suspicion over others, such as Jones, who were allowed to compete despite the investigation.

But Bonds is the biggest star of all, the holder of baseball's single-season home run record of 73 in 2001 and the man who could break Hank Aaron's career homer mark of 755 as early as next year. Bonds ended last season with 703 homers and won his record seventh NL Most Valuable Player award.

It is uncertain what punishment, if any, Bonds could receive from baseball, which didn't have penalties for steroid use until last year.

While discipline is spelled out for positive tests and criminal convictions from 2003 on, admission of illegal steroid use is not addressed, possibly giving baseball commissioner Bud Selig an opening to punish Bonds.

The Chronicle said prosecutors confronted Bonds with documents dating to his record-setting season of 2001 that allegedly detailed his use of many drugs, including human growth hormone, steroids and insulin. He said he believed he only used legal products to treat arthritis and fatigue.

Bonds danced around questions, saying he couldn't explain a calendar with the name "Barry" on it; he had never seen a bottle that says Depo-Testosterone; he had never heard of the drugs Clomid, modafinil and trenbolone; and he couldn't pronounce EPO.

Sheffield testified to the grand jury that Bonds arranged for Anderson to give Sheffield "the clear," "the cream," and another steroid from Mexico, but also said he did not know they were steroids, the Chronicle reported.

Bonds said he never paid Anderson for drugs or supplements but did give the trainer $15,000 in cash in 2003 for weight training and a $20,000 bonus after his 73-homer season.

Bonds said that Anderson had so little money that he "lives in his car half the time." Asked by a juror why he didn't buy "a mansion" for his trainer, Bonds answered: "One, I'm black, and I'm keeping my money. And there's not too many rich black people in this world. There's more wealthy Asian people and Caucasian and white. And I ain't giving my money up."

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2004/baseball/mlb/12/03/bonds.steroids.ap/index.html
 
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butter418

TRIBE Member
Originally posted by Resolver
:eek: Is that a MLB record for most walks in a season?

I think so but I know his on base percentage is the highest evar.

And as far as Mr McGwire goes I think he's sitting at home shitting bricks and hoping his name doesn't come up.
 

fleaflo

TRIBE Member
Barry needs to do what McGwire did when he got hit over the head with the truth....RETIRE. It's pretty annoying to see someone as anally retentive as Bonds try and sell to people that he didn't know what he was taking.

The truth is out. No need to have any disagreements on the status of the Bonds. Hes a cheater and he got caught. Adios little man. If you apologize now and go away quietly, you'll still get in the Hall of Fame and everyone will forgive you.

Obviously there is a certain period of time where Bonds, Sosa & Mcgwires records need to be looked at. The homerun record needs to be returned to it's rightful owner...Roger Maris
 
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