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Another day, another mass shooting

ndrwrld

TRIBE Member
US Navy sailor kills 2, injures 1, before killing himself @ Pearl Harbor, 3 days before anniversary of Pearl Harbor. He had sought out counseling and been targeted by an informal hearing tied to non-judicial punishment proceedings before he was provided loaded firearms for guard duty.

2 days later...

Saudi Arabian national, taking aviation training courses at exact same Naval base where 9/11 Saudi terrorists also took aviation training, kills 3, injures 8 on base.

American Intelligence didn't pick up on either of them.
America has a serious problem.
So does Canada...when we're still selling the Saudis billions worth of arms.
 
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praktik

TRIBE Member
US Navy sailor kills 2, injures 1, before killing himself @ Pearl Harbor, 3 days before anniversary of Pearl Harbor. He had sought out counseling and been targeted by an informal hearing tied to non-judicial punishment proceedings before he was provided loaded firearms for guard duty.

2 days later...

Saudi Arabian national, taking aviation training courses at exact same Naval base where 9/11 Saudi terrorists also took aviation training, kills 3, injures 8 on base.

American Intelligence didn't pick up on either of them.
America has a serious problem.
So does Canada...when we're still selling the Saudis billions worth of arms.
Trump is even MORE in bed with the Saudis than any other US president, and that's saying something after Dubya and his dad!

I bet you MBS has already told Donald how this should go down.
 

Bernnie Federko

TRIBE Member
A database compiled by AP, USA Today and Northeastern University finds more mass killings in 2019 than any year dating back to at least the 1970s, AP's Lisa Marie Pane reports.

  • There were 41 mass killings — defined as four or more killed, excluding the perpetrator. (33 were shootings.)
  • "[M]ass killings are going up at a time when ... overall homicides are going down," said James Densley, a criminologist and professor at Metropolitan State University in Minnesota.
  • He believes it's partially a byproduct of an "angry and frustrated time" that we are living in: "This seems to be the age of mass shootings."
Most of the mass killings barely became national news, failing to resonate among the general public because they didn't spill into public places like massacres in El Paso and Odessa, Texas; Dayton, Ohio; Virginia Beach, Virginia; and Jersey City, New Jersey.

  • The majority of the killings involved people who knew each other — family disputes, drug or gang violence or people with beefs that directed their anger at co-workers or relatives.
  • California, with some of the most strict gun laws in the country, had the most mass slayings — eight.
Research going back to the 1970s shows no other year with as many mass slayings. The second-most killings in a year prior to 2019 was 38 in 2006.

  • The 211 people killed in this year's cases is eclipsed by the 224 victims killed in Vegas in 2017 — the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.
 

Bernnie Federko

TRIBE Member
Police say at least 16 people plus the gunman were killed in multiple shootings across several communities in rural Nova Scotia between Saturday night and Sunday morning. An RCMP officer, Constable Heidi Stevenson, was among the dead. Another officer was in hospital recovering from injuries. It was the deadliest mass shooting in Canadian history.

What we know

The first gunshots were fired late Saturday night, in the tiny beach village of Portapique, about 40 kilometres west of Truro. The last shots came 14 hours later and about 90 kilometres away, in the parking lot of an Irving Big Stop gas station in the community of Enfield.


In the tense and devastating hours that passed between, people both connected and unconnected to the shooter would be killed in a rampage that left the province littered with crime scenes and a yet-untallied number of victims.

“Some of these crime scenes, we’ve not even begun to process,” RCMP criminal operations officer Chief Superintendent Chris Leather, speaking at a sombre news conference in Dartmouth early Sunday evening.


He described the number of victims as “in excess of 10,” but the RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki later told The Globe and Mail in an interview that there were 13 victims, plus the shooter, and the possibility it could be higher still.


“I don’t want to say that [the number] is not going to change," she said. "But hopefully it won’t.”


Within hours, the number of victims had risen to 16.


The killer has been identified as Gabriel Wortman, a 51-year-old denturist from Dartmouth.


The suspect


Wortman, the man who impersonated a police officer during the deadly rampage, displayed an obsession with law enforcement dating to his high school years.


Nathan Staples, who lives outside the nearby community of Great Village, said Wortman was obsessed with the police, and that his home in Portapique was a “shrine” to the RCMP. A few months ago, he went to Mr. Staples’s house, asking whether he would sell his used police cruiser sitting in the front lawn.


“He was one of those freaky guys, he was really into police memorabilia,” Staples said.
 
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