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Air Purifiers?

grounded4life

TRIBE Member
Ok, so who's got 'em? I just read a review of them and they don't seem to be the best for eliminating smoke, pet dander, allergens and what not. I'm wondering if there are any people out there that have one and swear by them. Do you feel that they eliminate allergen adequately? I suffer from sever hayfever and thought that this would help out in late summer. I also have 2 cats. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks. :D
 

deevah

TRIBE Member
i have one for the bedroom and one for the livingroom
1 cat, various things are smoked in our household, live downtown

the filters are pretty disgusting when it comes time to change them

the one in the bedroom also has an ionizer

i think it's better than not having one - the ionizer makes the air smell...cleaner....
 

Scarlett

TRIBE Member
I heard the ionizing filters are kind of useless and you're better off with one with a HEPA filter instead...something about the ozone with the ion-filters...
 
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grounded4life

TRIBE Member
geminigirl said:
I need to buy one very soon as well.

I think it is very neccessary having 5 pets. I must get on this.
Well the reviews I have heard haven't been that great so I'm just seeing what other people think before I spend the money.
 

Sinister Shadow

TRIBE Member
I've got a vac with a hepa filter on it. Since dander/lint and related things generally fall to the ground I think this will service you a lot better than an air filter which won't exhange all that much air anyway. Better to pick up the stationary items, clean your house and filter out large amounts of dander as you do it.

I just don't think small home air filters have the kick to filter a homes worth of air.
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
Sinister Shadow said:
I've got a vac with a hepa filter on it. Since dander/lint and related things generally fall to the ground I think this will service you a lot better than an air filter which won't exhange all that much air anyway. Better to pick up the stationary items, clean your house and filter out large amounts of dander as you do it.

I just don't think small home air filters have the kick to filter a homes worth of air.

Consumer Reports really didn't have to much good to say about the vast majority of the air purifier systems they reviewed. Most of them really did nothing except release Ozone in the air which although somewaht pleasent smelling actually doesn't clean a single thing and can cause problems for those suffering from asthma or allergies.

I'm tempted to say that Sinister Shadow likely has it right. Unless you can move the air around and effectively bring it through a filter your likely not accomplishing much.

Many people make the assumption that because the filter gets dirty its accomplishing something. Really this doesn't prove as much as you'd think. Normally the dirt you see is the large particle dust it picked up that your already designed to filter by nature.
 

annec

TRIBE Member
Ditto Much said:
Consumer Reports really didn't have to much good to say about the vast majority of the air purifier systems they reviewed. Most of them really did nothing except release Ozone in the air which although somewaht pleasent smelling actually doesn't clean a single thing and can cause problems for those suffering from asthma or allergies.

I'm tempted to say that Sinister Shadow likely has it right. Unless you can move the air around and effectively bring it through a filter your likely not accomplishing much.

Many people make the assumption that because the filter gets dirty its accomplishing something. Really this doesn't prove as much as you'd think. Normally the dirt you see is the large particle dust it picked up that your already designed to filter by nature.
Oh Ditto, you're so practical! :)
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
annec said:
Oh Ditto, you're so practical! :)


Yeah its funny, I can be practical when it comes to come things and then I go and buy a prosche ...

damn here's to starting my quarter life crisis
 
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geminigirl

TRIBE Member
grounded4life said:
Well the reviews I have heard haven't been that great so I'm just seeing what other people think before I spend the money.
hmmmm I've always heard great things. I have terrible allergies and asthma and air purifiers have been strongly recommended to me.
 

eskimo

TRIBE Member
geminigirl said:
hmmmm I've always heard great things. I have terrible allergies and asthma and air purifiers have been strongly recommended to me.

we have three at home, one in each room pretty much. they work great, makes the house not so stuffy and cuts down on the amount of dust.
 

Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
Some of the higher end units (500+) aren't half bad. But almost nothing under the 200 range did a blessed thing

http://www.consumersearch.com/www/house_and_home/air-purifier-reviews/

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has an excellent document titled "Residential Air Cleaning Devices: A Summary of Available Information" (see our Best Research section below for the link to that article). The EPA doesn't take a position either for or against air purifiers, but states, "Some air purifiers, under the right conditions, can effectively remove certain respirable-size particles" (for example, tobacco smoke particles). Both the EPA and American Lung Association recommend that air purifiers be used as a last resort after allergen source control and ventilation. According to Consumer Reports, "In short, only those with respiratory problems are likely to benefit from using an air cleaner."

Before you run out and buy a $300 air purifier, you might make a $15 investment and try a simple whole-house filter. If you have forced-air heating or cooling, these filters simply replace your regular furnace filter. Filters such as the 3M Filtrete Ultra (*est. $15) are effective at trapping particles like dust and pollen, but aren't very effective with smoke. Filters need to be replaced every three months; 3M even provides e-mail reminders from its Web site.

Although such filters can reduce airflow in your system, we think they are worth a try if your main problems are airborne dust, pet hair and dander. A $15 furnace filter, according to Consumer Reports, can be just as effective as room-sized models in removing those allergens at a low cost.
I'm not questioning the results you've had, but I wonder if most people wouldn't be better off reading up on these air filters before sinking money into them. Unless you have a really really good unit and your really sensitive your likely better off doing a good home cleaning and buying the furnace filter.
 

catilyst

TRIBE Member
I've got a HEPA filter that I paid about 200 bucks for and its ok. I have asthma and allergies but this hasn't made as much difference as I'd hoped. I would save the money and vacuum and dust more often. It does get rid of smoke fairly quickly which can be handy!
 

grounded4life

TRIBE Member
In that case can anyone suggest a place where I can get one. There are tonnes of places that have them, cost co, circuit city, etc... just wondering where you bought yours?
 
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Ditto Much

TRIBE Member
Isn't it Ionic? Air Purifiers Make Smog
By Robert Roy Britt
LiveScience Managing Editor
posted: 09 May 2006
03:30 pm ET


Here's how to create your own personal Stage 2 Smog Alert: Buy an indoor air purifier.

Using a popular process called ionization, the air cleaners can actually generate ozone levels in a room that exceed the worst smog days in Los Angeles, a new study finds.

The devices are popular in urban areas. They are touted as getting rid of dust, pollen and other airborne particles.

Fill the room

Ionic air purifiers, one type of these devices, are said to work by charging airborne particles and then attracting them to metal electrodes. They emit ozone as a byproduct of this ionization process.

In a small and poorly ventilated room, the ozone adds to existing ozone and creates potentially unhealthy concentrations.

"People operating air purifiers indoors are more prone to being exposed to ozone levels in excess of public health standards," said study leader Sergey Nizkorodov, a chemistry professor the University of California, Irvine.

The research, funded in part by the National Science Foundation, was announced today and is detailed in the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association.

Ozone high in the atmosphere protects Earth from damaging ultraviolet radiation. Down here, it is called smog. Ozone can damage the lungs and cause shortness of breath and throat irritation, and it can also exacerbate asthma.

Insidious machines

Nizkorodov and colleagues tested various air purifiers in homes, offices and cars. In many cases, ozone levels inside climbed above 90 parts per billion, exceeding California's basic safety threshold. In some cases, ozone soared higher than 350 parts per billion, which if measured outside would trigger a Stage 2 Smog Alert, an event that hasn't occurred in the Southern California coastal air basin since 1988.

California lawmakers are considering legislation to reduce emissions from indoor air purifiers. Meanwhile, both the state and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have issued advisories discouraging their use.

"These machines are insidious," said Barbara Riordan, acting chairperson of the California Air Resources Board (ARB), in a warning last year. "Marketed as a strong defense against indoor air pollution, they emit ozone, the same chemical that the ARB and … U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have been trying to eliminate from our air for decades. More chilling is that some people susceptible to the ill effects of ozone will eagerly bring these Trojan horses home."

Science does not even suggest the things do what they're purported to do.

An EPA fact sheet has this to say about air purifiers: "Available scientific evidence shows that at concentrations that do not exceed public health standards, ozone has little potential to remove indoor air contaminants. Some manufacturers or vendors suggest that ozone will render almost every chemical contaminant harmless by producing a chemical reaction whose only by-products are carbon dioxide, oxygen and water. This is misleading."
 

lobo

TRIBE Member
Wow that's a scary article. I have two of these ionic purifiers and have been using them for about three years. At first they do seem to work as the house smelled slightly "cleaner". Now I guess I've gotten used to it and it doesn't smell as fresh but I'm sure it's doing something. When I clean the pre-filter and the metal plates the water is very brown/black due to all the dust and inpurities it captures. Yuck indeed. My allergies are still pretty bad though and it hasn't reduced the number of colds my son gets as the rep promised it would.

As for new products, I hear that the Sharp air purifiers are very popular in the GTA and seem to use a new technology for cleaning the air. And their ozone emission is supposedly the lowest of all products. Future Shop sells them but they are pricey ($250+). Anything less than $200 I would stay away from. I'm thinking of replacing the ones I have with the new Sharp ones but I paid $2000 for the two I have and I'm hesistant to part with them because of how much I spent.

Here's Sharp's website discussing the products:

http://www.sharp.ca/products/index.asp?cat=75

Make sure to read the FAQ on the products as it's very insiteful.

http://www.sharp.ca/products/ion/faqs.asp

Lobo

P.S. Hi Gal!!! :)
 

bitchass

TRIBE Member
I just bought a new house last week and was reacting badly to dust until I replaced the furnace filter with a HEPA(type). Made a pretty big difference within a couple days of leaving the fan on nonstop.

I'm still looking for a bigger solution but i'm hesitant to get anything that requires purchased refills - there are many HEPA filters that are cleaned by simply washing them in water. More expensive to buy upfront but saves a fortune in the longterm.
 
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