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Acquire The Measles: Christian rock like a bad rash

alexd

Administrator
Staff member
Acquire the Fire event measles case prompts warning

Number of confirmed cases in GTA at 9, another 5 in Niagara Region
The Canadian Press Posted: Feb 16, 2015 8:51 AM ET Last Updated: Feb 16, 2015 12:57 PM ET

The number of measles cases in the Greater Toronto Area rose to nine on the weekend. Ontario's acting chief medical officer wants anyone who attended a youth gathering in Toronto to check immunization status after someone recently confirmed to have measles was at the event.

The number of measles cases in the Greater Toronto Area rose to nine on the weekend. Ontario's acting chief medical officer wants anyone who attended a youth gathering in Toronto to check immunization status after someone recently confirmed to have measles was at the event.

Ontario's acting chief medical officer is asking people who were at a youth gathering in Toronto to check their immunization status after an individual with a confirmed case of measles was found to have attended the event.

Dr. Robin Williams says the event — called Acquire the Fire — was held at the Queensway Cathedral in Toronto on Feb. 6 and 7 and was attended by more than 1,300 youth from all over Ontario. Many of those who attended spent a number of hours together a single large room.

Individuals born after 1970 who attended the event are being asked to review their immunization status to ensure they are protected against measles.

Anyone who has not been adequately immunized is being asked to stay at home and contact their local public health unit.

Individuals who attended the event and develop these symptoms over the next two weeks are being advised to contact their primary care provider by phone:

Fever.
Cough.
Runny nose.
Inflammation of the eyes.
Rash.

Williams' advisory comes after multiple new cases were confirmed in Ontario in recent days. Over the weekend, two adults were confirmed as the eighth and ninth measles cases in the Greater Toronto Area.

As of this morning, there were five lab-confirmed cases of measles in the Niagara Region, according to the website for Niagara Region Public Health. Officials had announced Saturday that a 14-year-old girl was the region's second case — meaning that between Saturday afternoon and this morning, three new cases have been confirmed.

No details about the patients or their conditions have been released.

Meanwhile. health officials in Quebec confirmed last Wednesday that 10 individuals in the Lanaudiere region northeast of Montreal had been infected with measles, with all cases linked to the outbreak at Disneyland in California.

On Tuesday, the Manitoba government reported the province's first case of measles of the year, a Winnipeg infant who had recently returned from India.
 
Stop Bill C-10

acheron

TRIBE Member
measles.jpg
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
When measels was around in the 1980s, was there a big media push like there is today? I don't really recall my parents being scared about it.

"Before a vaccine was available, infection with measles virus was nearly universal during childhood, and more than 90% of persons were immune by age 15 years." - CDC - Pinkbook: Measles Chapter - Epidemiology of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

What has changed?

We were used to 1 in 1000 cases leading to encephalitis and death - we were used to some extended hospitalizations - we were used to a background rate of measles infection.

We then enjoyed a period in the sun where herd immunity was sufficient to eradicate homegrown cases in NA (until recently any cases were always imports from undervaccinated countries where it was still endemic).

But we also entered a period where - in popular culture - a massive anti-vaccine movement arose. So we are dealing with a double whammy:

1) Reintroduction of measles after eradication (makes us notice more)
2) Coming at time when a nexus of naturopaths and anti-vaccine people are saying the measles "aren't a big deal"

That - essentially - is what has changed.
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
Before the vaccine, 48,000 people a year were hospitalized for the measles; 4,000 developed measles-associated encephalitis; and 400 to 500 people died.

Whats ironic for the anti-vaccine movement is they discuss vaccine related encephalitis, about a 1 in 1 000 000 chance, but then risk measles, of which 1 in 1000 will cause the exact same condition. I guess math isn't their strong suit.

And I'm not sure why we'd be happy to let 4-500 children die a year when we can easily avoid it with a super low risk vaccine.
 
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Sal De Ban

TRIBE Member
I see. All good stuff, thanks. Is there really an anti-vaccine movement though? I don't really see a huge organized group speaking about against vaccines online anywhere, or in public that could constitute as a real movement.

One thing I do see, however, is people getting very aggressive (not you!) about their supportive stance - seemingly fighting and arguing with hypothetical opponents.

Again in short, I haven't seen a real prevalent 'movement' away from vaccines that matches the aggression, media savv, and political sexiness of the pro-vaccination movement.

Sure, there are people that have their doubts as to whether or not they should trust pharmaceutical companies - but some of those people end up getting vaccines for themselves (and their children) anyways. So the group of people that are anti-vaccination, and end up standing by that, is smaller than everyone is making it out to be.

If we don't blame/scapegoat this small group, what other factors have led to a spread in measels?
 

lobo

TRIBE Member
I think the movement has been bigger in the U.S. than up here but it's definitely big and has been in the news down there for years now after Jenny McCarthy went on her big push to not vaccinate after thinking that her kid got autism from getting a vaccine shot.

Lobo
 

Spinsah

TRIBE Member
I see. All good stuff, thanks. Is there really an anti-vaccine movement though? I don't really see a huge organized group speaking about against vaccines online anywhere, or in public that could constitute as a real movement.
There's a huge movement online and anti-vaccination rates are very high in certain communities. Upper class enclaves in Orange Country California have huge percentages vaccinated, which has risen in tandem with raising children free of any perceived toxins (GMOs, vaccines). A Whole Foods wet dream.

An alternative school in Toronto only has a 46% vaccination rate (46!) so this is a problem in this city as well.

It's an interesting case study that shows how first world privilege, combined with easy access to pseudo-science can have detrimental, third world consequences. The irony would be funny if it wasn't so freaking dangerous.
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
Its found some easy routes into Granola-land through the trend in priviliged areas to consult naturopaths (one of which played a role in the recent horrible Toronto Star story on Gardasil; see also recent CBC marketplace where they didnt come out looking so good) - naturopathy has essentially had anti-vaccine teachings in its core curriculae since its inception.

But its also been a victim of the rise of the "natural" trend in yuppie-dom, where this and anti-GMO and a fetish for anything "organic" (add a dash of chemophobia) have come together in this "Natural Nexus" - once you get into the bubble the power of crank magnetism will pull you closer to falling prey to anti-vaccine memes.

That and the University of Google.
 
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Sal De Ban

TRIBE Member
There's a huge movement online and anti-vaccination rates are very high in certain communities. Upper class enclaves in Orange Country California have huge percentages vaccinated, which has risen in tandem with raising children free of any perceived toxins (GMOs, vaccines). A Whole Foods wet dream.

An alternative school in Toronto only has a 46% vaccination rate (46!) so this is a problem in this city as well.

It's an interesting case study that shows how first world privilege, combined with easy access to pseudo-science can have detrimental, third world consequences. The irony would be funny if it wasn't so freaking dangerous.

If the problem lies in regions of lower socioeconomic standing, might I siggest that lower vaccination rates are a failing of public health outreach and access to proper medical resources as opposed to a success of Jenny McCarthy's pseudoscience?
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
If the problem lies in regions of lower socioeconomic standing, might I siggest that lower vaccination rates are a failing of public health outreach and access to proper medical resources as opposed to a success of Jenny McCarthy's pseudoscience?

QMhuGYF.jpg


This was one of funniest tweets as the measles stories hit - we're entering a bizarro world where 1st world populations will have worse health measures than many african countries, as our vax rates dip.
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
And i didnt know that Jenny M was leading the charge - that's pretty funny imo

She and her doctor, Doctor Jay Gordon were big at popularizing the anti vaccine movement - false equivalence ensured they would be able to get a free pass in the media.

Andrew Wakefield though kicked things into high gear with his now discredited study on the MMR/Autism connection and his now obvious attempt to shape a study to financially enrich himself and a business interest he was starting...


I think Jenny M isn't winning too many new converts though - the gravity behind anti-vaccine is very much carried online, by Mike Adams and Natural News, Joe Mercola and other perches in the alternative health world where a Big Pharma warning is accompanied by a sell on some supplements or propietary cure for autism....Places like Infowars are of course 100% antivaccine, integrating this into their conspiracy theology.
 
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praktik

TRIBE Member
Scientists Crack A 50-Year-Old Mystery About The Measles Vaccine : Goats and Soda : NPR

Turns out that the measles vaccine reduced a ton of non measles deaths after its introduction - because in the years following a measles case the immune system is weakened, so death rates from other infections are all much higher in populations with high measles incidence from this follow-on infection effect...

You vaccinate and measles goes down - and so too do all these other fatal infections!!
 

praktik

TRIBE Member
Stupid wops:

The Opinion Pages | EDITORIAL
Populism, Politics and Measles

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Beppe Grillo, the leader of the populist Five Star Movement in Italy, has campaigned actively on an anti-vaccination platform. CreditMarco Bertorello/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

One of the tragedies of these post-truth times is that the lies, conspiracy theories and illusions spread by social media and populist politicians can be downright dangerous. The denial of human responsibility for climate change is one obvious example; another is opposition to vaccination. A serious outbreak of measles in Italy and in some other European countries could well be the result of a drop-off in vaccinations caused by utterly misguided and discredited claims about their dangers.

Vaccines are among the greatest achievements of medical science, an easily and safely administered defense against once common and often deadly diseases like measles, polio, smallpox, whooping cough and cervical cancer. Yet fear of vaccines has spread over the past two decades, fueled in part by an infamous study published in the medical journal Lancet in 1998 and later retracted and completely discredited.

More recently, President Trump has added his voice to vaccine skepticism, like this utterly unfounded and irresponsible tweet: “Healthy young child goes to doctor, gets pumped with massive shot of many vaccines, doesn’t feel good and changes - AUTISM. Many such cases!” In Italy, the populist Five Star Movement (M5S) led by the comedian Beppe Grillo has campaigned actively on an anti-vaccination platform, likewise repeating the false ties between vaccinations and autism.

To these and other skeptics, the measles outbreak in Italy should sound a piercing alarm. As of April 26, the Italian Ministry of Health had reported 1,739 cases of the disease, compared with 840 in all of 2016 and only 250 in 2015. Of those stricken, 88 percent had not been vaccinated. The danger was not only to them: 159 of the cases were health care workers infected by patients. Yet studies show that 97 percent of people who receive the recommended two doses of MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine are fully protected. Most people today would not remember a time when measles — or mumps, or polio — were commonplace.

M5S may not be responsible for the entire outbreak, since vaccine skepticism predates the party’s rise. Yet the percentage of 2-year-olds given vaccinations has steadily fallen in recent years, from 88 percent in 2013 to 86 percent in 2014 and 85.3 percent in 2015. The World Health Organization regards 95 percent as the level to achieve “herd immunity,” at which point the disease poses no threat to the entire community.

Combating vaccine skepticism is not easy, because even the countless studies by innumerable health groups affirming that there is no link between vaccines and autism have failed to penetrate the fog spread by Mr. Grillo and his ilk. The Italian measles outbreak, unfortunate as it is, does give health authorities an opportunity to strengthen their case by pointing to concrete evidence of what inevitably follows when vaccinations drop off.
 
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