MLK Day

Discussion in 'TRIBE Main Forum' started by Tonedeff, Jan 20, 2002.

  1. Tonedeff

    Tonedeff TRIBE Member

    If any of you are around when I have to meet my day, I don’t want a long funeral. And if you get somebody to deliver the eulogy, tell them not to talk too long. And every now and then I wonder what I want them to say. Tell them not to mention that I have a Nobel Peace Prize—that isn’t important. Tell them not to mention that I have three or four hundred other awards—that’s not important. Tell them not to mention where I went to school.

    I'd like somebody to mention that day that Martin Luther King, Jr., tried to give his life serving others.

    I'd like for somebody to say that day that Martin Luther King, Jr., tried to love somebody.

    I want you to say that day that I tried to be right on the war question.

    I want you to be able to say that day that I did try to feed the hungry.

    And I want you to be able to say that day that I did try in my life to clothe those who were naked.

    I want you to say on that day that I did try in my life to visit those who were in prison.

    I want you to say that I tried to love and serve humanity.

    Yes, if you want to say that I was a drum major, say that I was a drum major for justice. Say that I was a drum major for peace. I was a drum major for righteousness. And all of the other shallow things will not matter. I won't have any money to leave behind. I won't have the fine and luxurious things of life to leave behind. But I just want to leave a committed life behind. And that's all I want to say.


    From "The Drum Major Instinct Sermon," delivered in February of 1968 by Martin Luther King, Jr., at Ebeneezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, six weeks before his assassination in Memphis.

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  2. deep

    deep TRIBE Member

    respect
     
  3. Tonedeff

    Tonedeff TRIBE Member

    Somehow this madness must cease. We must stop now. I speak as a child of God and brother to the suffering poor of Vietnam. I speak for those whose land is being laid waste, whose homes are being destroyed, whose culture is being subverted. I speak for the poor in America who are paying the double price of smashed hopes at home and death and corruption in Vietnam. I speak as a citizen of the world, for the world as it stands aghast at the path we have taken. I speak as an American to the leaders of my own nation. The great initiative in this war is ours. The initiative to stop it must be ours.

    From The Trumpet of Conscience, 1967

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  4. Tonedeff

    Tonedeff TRIBE Member

    Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that. Hate multiplies hate, violence multiplies violence, and toughness multiplies toughness in a descending spiral of destruction....The chain reaction of evil--hate begetting hate, wars producing more wars--must be broken, or we shall be plunged into the dark abyss of annihilation.

    From Strength to Love, 1963

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  5. Tonedeff

    Tonedeff TRIBE Member

    Many of the ugly pages of American history have been obscured and forgotten....America owes a debt of justice which it has only begun to pay. If it loses the will to finish or slackens in its determination, history will recall its crimes and the country that would be great will lack the most indispensable element of greatness--justice.

    From Where Do We Go From Here, Chaos or Community? 1967
     
  6. Tonedeff

    Tonedeff TRIBE Member

    Man was born into barbarism when killing his fellow man was a normal condition of existence. He became endowed with a conscience. And he has now reached the day when violence toward another human being must become as abhorrent as eating another's flesh.

    From Why We Can't Wait, 1963
     
  7. Tonedeff

    Tonedeff TRIBE Member

    The curse of poverty has no justification in our age. It is socially as cruel and blind as the practice of cannibalism at the dawn of civilization, when men ate each other because they had not yet learned to take food from the soil or to consume the abundant animal life around them. The time has come for us to civilize ourselves by the total, direct and immediate abolition of poverty.

    From Where do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?

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  8. deep

    deep TRIBE Member

    very cool of you to post these quotes josh

    not normally a quote person but that tends to apply to the one-line variety
     
  9. Tonedeff

    Tonedeff TRIBE Member

    It may be true that the law cannot make a man love me, but it can keep him from lynching me, and I think that's pretty important.

    From The Wall Street Journal, 1962

    Human salvation lies in the hands of the creatively maladjusted.

    Strength To Love, 1963

    If a man hasn't discovered something that he will die for, he isn't fit to live.

    Speech in Detroit, June 1963
     
  10. Tonedeff

    Tonedeff TRIBE Member

    Thanks deep, last night when I got home I was reading through Bearing the Cross by David Garrow (a really good MLK bio), and I was really struck by how much we (and specifically the United States) need someone like King now.

    Reading through his speeches and his texts I can't believe the kind of resonance and relevance they have to our current geopolitical situation.

    I wonder what King would have to say about the War on Terror?
     
  11. Tonedeff

    Tonedeff TRIBE Member

    I know this is really long, and most of you are probably familiar with it already, but I think it bears a close reading today. If somebody has an audio link to the speech (I have it on cd but not mp3), please post a link.

    Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity. But one hundred years later, we must face the tragic fact that the Negro is still not free.

    One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land.

    So we have come here today to dramatize an appalling condition. In a sense we have come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir.

    This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check which has come back marked "insufficient funds." But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation.

    So we have come to cash this check -- a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to open the doors of opportunity to all of God's children. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood.

    It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment and to underestimate the determination of the Negro. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights.

    The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges. But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

    We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. we must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.

    The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny and their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.

    We cannot walk alone. And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, "When will you be satisfied?" we can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro's basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

    I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

    Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair. I say to you today, my friends, that in spite of the difficulties and frustrations of the moment, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

    I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal." I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slaveowners will be able to sit down together at a table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a desert state, sweltering with the heat of injustice and oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today.

    I have a dream that one day the state of Alabama, whose governor's lips are presently dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, will be transformed into a situation where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers. I have a dream today. I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together. This is our hope. This is the faith with which I return to the South. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

    This will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with a new meaning, "My country, 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim's pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring." And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania! Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado! Let freedom ring from the curvaceous peaks of California! But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia! Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee! Let freedom ring from every hill and every molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

    When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, "Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!"


    Deliverd on the steps at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C., August 28 1963
     
  12. Tonedeff

    Tonedeff TRIBE Member

    Peace is not the absence of conflict, but the presence of justice.

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  13. PosTMOd

    PosTMOd Well-Known Member

  14. Tonedeff

    Tonedeff TRIBE Member

    thanks Timo
     
  15. Rosey

    Rosey TRIBE Member

    *bump*
     
  16. Subsonic Chronic

    Subsonic Chronic TRIBE Member

  17. tommysmalls

    tommysmalls TRIBE Member

    what a brilliant speaker - i'm in total of his greatness as a leader.
     
  18. Thanks for the quotes, bro. I really appreciate this.

    From the Ministry of one of my heros

    Prime Minister Highsteppa
     
  19. KiX

    KiX TRIBE Member

    Thank you. [​IMG]

    =tina=
     
  20. Sporty Dan

    Sporty Dan TRIBE Member

    http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20020116/od/plaque_dc_1.html

    dan.

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    Actor's Plaque Mistakenly Honors King's Assassin

    LAUDERHILL, Fla. (Reuters) - A plaque intended to honor black actor James Earl Jones at a Florida celebration of the life of Martin Luther King instead paid tribute to James Earl Ray, the man who killed the black civil rights leader, officials said on Wednesday.

    The embarrassing mix-up was caused by an error by the plaque's designer, the owner of the company that ordered the plaque said. It was being corrected in time for Jones' visit to the Fort Lauderdale suburb on Saturday.

    Over a background featuring stamps of famous black Americans, including King, the erroneous plaque read, ``Thank you James Earl Ray for keeping the dream alive.''

    He was the man who shot and killed King in a Memphis hotel in 1968. King is honored across the nation on Jan. 21, Martin Luther King Day.

    ``We were very upset,'' said Gerald Wilcox, owner of Lauderhill-based Adpro, which ordered the plaque for the city. ''We wanted to find out how a mistake of this magnitude could occur and to try to determine if it was deliberate or not.''

    Wilcox said his company made it clear to the plaque's manufacturer, Texas-based Merit Industries, that the message was for James Earl Jones, the Tony Award-winning actor who voiced the roles of Darth Vader in ``Star Wars'' and Mufasa in ''The Lion King.''

    Merit Industries said the mix-up was caused by a typographical error.

    ``We in no way meant any disrespect. It was an honest error,'' said Herbert Miller, the owner of Merit Industries.
     
  21. Tonedeff

    Tonedeff TRIBE Member

    ^^^anyone remember when they reopened the King murder case a couple of years ago in Memphis when the King family brought the wrongful death suit against Loyd Jowers?

    Probably not, because it wasn't widely covered in the media, and much of the coverage was simply criticism of the King family for misusing the legal system (Ed Posner, who wrote the definitive book on the MLK assassination, had a fit in his Washington Post column and compared the conspiracy to Holocaust deniers).

    It's a pretty scary story, straight out of Oliver Stone's delusional imagination (who incidentally owns the movie rights), and it's full of deep south oddities like people changing their stories, a deep throatish figure known only as "Raul," and the state judge testifying as an "expert" on guns based on the fact that he owned a lot of guns (he used this expertise to testify that James Earl Ray's gun could not have killed King).

    The jury ruled in favour of the King family, finding that Loyd Jowers and a host of unknown conspirators were responsible for MLK's death. The King family was awarded $100 (that's what they asked for). James Earl Ray died in prison in 1998.

    If you want a little more info on the conspiracy you can read this article by Douglas Valentine, a King scholar and researcher who was close to the family: http://www.douglasvalentine.com/articles.html

    p.s. Rosey thanks for bumping this yesterday
     
  22. echo

    echo TRIBE Member

    Too inspiring to be bumped to the second page [​IMG]

    Thanks Tonedeff.

    [​IMG]echo
     

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