How to mount photos on canvas?

Discussion in 'TRIBE Main Forum' started by todiefor, Jun 9, 2009.

  1. todiefor

    todiefor TRIBE Promoter

    Anyone havea ny suggestions? I'm looking at mounting some of my photos on art canvas and am trying to figure out which adhesive would work best.

    Ideas?

    I know Homey the clown would have horked on it, but I'm not sure how well that works in the long run...
     
  2. Rajio

    Rajio Well-Known Member

    nails
     
  3. acheron

    acheron TRIBE Member

    UHU?

    If they're your photos why not print them on canvas to begin with?
     
  4. Joe Seven

    Joe Seven TRIBE Member

    Super 77 spray mount would probably work well for that. Check out art supply stores.
     
  5. Boss Hog

    Boss Hog TRIBE Member

    Yeah I've had photos printed on canvas before, do you want to print them yourself? I was just gonna suggest going to a place like Elpro photo and telling them what you want. They do everything, and cheap. Be warned though, they tend to discolour a bit over time.
     
  6. ian

    ian TRIBE Member

    What's the point of mounting a photo on canvas?

    Someone fill me in here.
     
  7. Boss Hog

    Boss Hog TRIBE Member

    aesthetic
     
  8. ian

    ian TRIBE Member

    But he's not talking about printing a photo directly on canvas, wich I can see looking cool. . . . he said "mounting" and he's planning on using glue to do so?
     
  9. Aerius Zension

    Aerius Zension TRIBE Member

    Check with Thom100

    I think he opened a studio doing something along these lines.
     
  10. thom100

    thom100 TRIBE Member

    ^ yup, that's what I do, print digital files onto canvas. If you do it properly you wont see any fading in your life time. PM if you'd like some details.
     
  11. erika

    erika TRIBE Member

    ^
    and he does a great job of it too!
     
  12. todiefor

    todiefor TRIBE Promoter

    I actually never said the word glue. I'm looking for some ideas on how to "mount" photography on canvas other than printing directly onto it. I'm interested in trying to create a bit more texture for lack of a better word...

    Anyways, if you don't get the point of something, did you think any answer anyone was going to give you would suddenly open up your eyes to something you never realized? I doubt it.
     
  13. thom100

    thom100 TRIBE Member

    The only real way you can "mount" a photo to canvas is to glue it(or use some sort of adhesive), in that case you're not going to have any texture that actually shows through the photographic paper. You're going to have a glued photo to a canvas which would look much like a glued photograph to just about any surface.

    You basically have two options; 1 is a chemical transfer, where you apply a chemical directly to your photo, then put the printed side down against the canvas. The ink transfers and you end up with a flipped image that doesn't have a very long life span, but it will give you the textured look. You can not use a traditional c-print for this, it must be an inkjet.

    Your second option is the printing on canvas directly from a digital file.
     
  14. Joe Seven

    Joe Seven TRIBE Member

    DROP THE 'TUDE DUDE!

    Hey thom do you have any experience with pouring clear resin onto photographs? I think I saw someone teaching a course on Queen W. last year, but I can't remember the name of the place.
     
  15. thom100

    thom100 TRIBE Member

    Funny you should bring that up joe, it is something I've been studying up on to start offering as a service. It is a hell of a pain in the ass, but you get to use blow torches which would be pretty cool. I'll pass on any info when I find it.
     
  16. watanabee

    watanabee TRIBE Member

    I used to work at a large format print shop here in Vancouver and I had several clients who I performed a "Canvas Transfer" for. We would print lightjet(photographic) prints and would pull the emulsion layer away from the paper backer on the print. We would them laminate the print using a 4' x 8' heat press. We would leave 1/4" - 1/2" of extra overlay on the lamination around the peeled print. Once the print was laminated we would then repress the print on top of the canvas with a layer of heat activated dry mounting tissues in between the canvas and print. The tissue and lamination edging would bond the print to the canvas and would be ready for stretching. We used on archival lam that is good for 100 years.

    This is a premium process though so expect to spend 30-40 per square foot. Not sure who in Toronto would perform this.
     

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